The Marshall Protocol Study Site Home

Search
   
Members

Calendar

Help

Home
Search by username
   Not logged in - Login | Register 


Medicine in the Future
 Moderated by: Dr Trevor Marshall  

New Topic

Reply

Print
AuthorPost
Deedee
member


Joined: Sun Dec 28th, 2008
Location: Asheville, North Carolina USA
Posts: 1001
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Feb 20th, 2012 15:27

Quote

Reply
"Patients share on online health communities and each of these social networks have amassed an enormous following. Let’s say you have a particular condition like multiple sclerosis, or a form of cancer or diabetes. You go on these social networks and find peers whom you’ve never met with, but they become your guidance and connections. And they are now more trusted than doctors by a substantial proportion of participants in these online health communities. Now, on the doctor side, almost 90 percent don’t even know these online communities exist, which is in itself surprising. But, if we work together, this is another opportunity to get information out there."

http://www.salon.com/2012/02/19/the_coming_medical_revolution/?source=newsletter



____________________
06/08 Sarc in lymph nodes. Chronic high lipids. 2010 heath cat scan-zero plaque. 11/12 D8, 12/12 Normal CXR except scarred lymph node, normal PFTs 8/12 Off all MP meds. Metabolic Syndrome
Dr Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Sat Jul 10th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 12468
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Feb 20th, 2012 19:04

Quote

Reply
Very Interesting read. Thanks for the link. A good start (although I note Topol is an observer, and hasn't had practical experience with anything he is writing about).

The book displays a trust in genetics to deliver useful data that I just don't see panning out. Not one mention of the metagenome, you will note...

And the fantasy about the "embedded nano-sensor" is ridiculous. I worked on implantable insulin infusers in the 1970's and they still haven't materialized. The body's defenses are good against anything which penetrates the skin, including implants. Have you noticed how implantable pacemakers are smooth and metallic? Even then, they are covered with the body's defensive mechanisms when removed from a person, and they generally have to be replaced every decade or so.

At this point there is no clinical evidence that the nanosensors will ever work. The immune system will overwhelm them. So why count on them as a key element of any future plan?

In the answer to that question lies the real problem with Medicine. It is always looking for a magic bullet. always looking to make therapies easy. Physicians are not trained to deal with complexity, but in reductionism -- to reduce a complex set of symptomatic problems down to a single diagnosis which can be treated by a single drug.

Trouble is, that strategy hasn't worked for chronic disease (including cancers). Until Medicine comes to an understanding of the complexity of the problem it will not be able to effectively deal with chronic disease, which is 70% of the US healthcare budget...

..Trevor..
ps: as for social networks being useful to patients, a lot has to change. Take for example the Sarcoidosis patient networks. All have banned discussion of anything to do with the Marshall Protocol. Here we are, a decade along, and they still will not allow substantive discussion of what we are doing. The same situation exists in the Lyme and CFS patient groups. Such networks have to be mentored, they have to be guided, and there is nothing in the current health system which provides training, or even encouragement, to the pioneers needed to start this new paradigm moving forward. Eric Topol hasn't figured that out yet...
 

leroybrown
Support Team


Joined: Sun Nov 1st, 2009
Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
Posts: 4271
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2012 13:20

Quote

Reply
I found the article interesting too, then got to the point where they talked about blocking the immune system. Same old thinking, just using new technology.

Deb



____________________
I just know that something good is going to happen
And I don't know when - Kate Bush
Aplastic anemia Apr/10, PRCA Jan/09, Agranulocytosis 1991
25D = 25 1,25D = 58 Aug 18/09|25D<4.8 Mar/10|10.8 Nov/12
Sep '09 q8h Nov '09 q6h
Deedee
member


Joined: Sun Dec 28th, 2008
Location: Asheville, North Carolina USA
Posts: 1001
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2012 14:14

Quote

Reply
When my husband was diagnosed with sarcoidosis in 30 years ago, the doctor looked at the Xray, did a bronchoscopy and told us that he had a disease that no one understood and no one knew the cause of, but that they though it might have something to do with his Greek ancestry and pine trees (since disproven.) He said we would have to wait a year to see if it progressed and if it did he would die from the disease. If it did not progress it would go away. That was all we knew--what the doctor told us.

There was no internet where we could read about the most recent research. There was no social network (good or bad) where we could talk to others with the same diagnosis.

I recall when the AIDS became epidemic in the gay community there was a movement for self-determination in regard to research and treatment. Instead of being the "patient", people became active partners in their treatment, often knowing more about the latest research than their doctors. They helped create their own treatment plans. At the time, that was revolutionary (and it wasn't that long ago.)

For those of us with so-called "rare diseases, I do think that the internet and social networking has been very valuable to us. Just think of where most of us would be if we were not able to find each other, share research, and have the benefits of the MP community. We are sharing information with each other, even when we live half way around the world. And even on those "other" sites where the MP is not allowed to be discussed, MP ideas have crept in and taken hold, which is evident in the now accepted advice for those who have sarcoidosis to avoid Vitamin D. Even with the ban on independent thinking and discussion, it goes on in cryptic ways and then there is always the "PM" for deeper discussions.

The author touched on how slow the medical community and doctors are to change. I believe he noted it takes about 17 years before innovation finds it's way to the beside. However, with people able to form communities and our ability to share information, educate each other and advocate for ourselves, it will become more and more difficult to sustain such resistance to new information, innovation, and change.

Last edited on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 14:16 by Deedee



____________________
06/08 Sarc in lymph nodes. Chronic high lipids. 2010 heath cat scan-zero plaque. 11/12 D8, 12/12 Normal CXR except scarred lymph node, normal PFTs 8/12 Off all MP meds. Metabolic Syndrome
Sallie Q
Support Team


Joined: Mon Jan 26th, 2009
Location: NSW_north, Australia
Posts: 3257
Status:  Online
 Posted: Mon Sep 24th, 2012 07:10

Quote

Reply
a doctor on doctors http://www.theglobalmail.org/feature/the-hip-bones-connected-to-the-heart-remedies-to-mend-medicine/392/



____________________
ARFconference MPsep'08(PtBreak20mgx2-3day)depressn70, br.cancer90, ?BCC/Bowens05,Sjogren08|Sx CFS,fog,stroke,RA 25D=9ng/ml_Mar'13 Med. myth

 Current time is 07:50



* We can help you understand chronic disease, but only your physician is licensed to give you medical care *

Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Entire site Copyright © 2004-2014 Autoimmunity Research Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Click here to view our PRIVACY POLICY
Page processed in 0.1029 seconds (9% database + 91% PHP). 18 queries executed.