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Vitamin D content of Beer
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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sat Dec 20th, 2008 08:42

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I have some data on the Vitamin D2 content of Beer (as Ergosterol). Incomplete, I know, but better than nothing :)

First, the 1928 paper confirming that irradiated Ergosterol behaves essentially the same as Vitamin D3 from animal sources:
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1252183&blobtype=pdf

I found a study which had been performed by the brewing industry in an attempt to prove that beer prevents cholesterol accumulation. They were unsuccessful in that, but they did measure the high Ergosterol content of at least one beer, totally failing to understand its significance, of course:
http://www.scientificsocieties.org/jib/papers/2007/G-2007-0424-504.pdf

In Table II they measured two beers. In one, the lager, any ergosterol was below their threshold of measurement. However, in a different type of beer, 'Weiss beer', they found:
"Even the level of ergosterol in a yeast rich Weiss bier (4.5 µg/330 mL) was still negligible compared to the recommended daily amount, which is of the order of grams"
Er, no, actually the 200IU US RDA of Vit D is about 5 micrograms of Vitamin D total from all sources :X

A full pint of that brew might contain the equivalent of 250IU. That's just one full pint... :):)

This assumes, of course, that the enzymes in the human body are capable of performing efficiently the functions usually performed by 'irradiation', ultraviolet light in the laboratory. Which I currently assume that they are.

Doesn't this give you confidence in the luminaries who are responsible for "improving" our food supply? I would appreciate anybody who has the time to do the legwork and see if there is any other more definitive data which would allow us to calculate exactly how Beer factors into the overall Vit D scheme of things...

Merry Christmas and  many Happy New Years to us all...
 

Frans
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 Posted: Sat Dec 20th, 2008 09:09

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Trevor,

I am not sure, but I thought D2 leads to 1,25D2 ? Instead of 1,25D3?

I read somewhere (don't remember where exactly) that 1,25D2 has about the same affinity for the VDR?

Does 1,25D2 have the same capacity to áctivate the VDR ?

Best, Frans



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sat Dec 20th, 2008 09:47

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As far as I can see, Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3 have identical actions in the human VDR.

The difference between them relates to the tail of the molecule, which plays little part on binding the co-activator DRIP205, which is required for transcription of all the genes which we are most interested in :) In fact, Olmesartan doesn't even have a significant 'tail' region.
 

Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sat Dec 20th, 2008 09:53

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Here is another paper to contemplate, the infamous Mushroom "enhancements." Note that the conversion efficiency they get by irradiation is quite low...

"Distribution of ergosterol in different tissues of mushrooms and its effect on the conversion of ergosterol to vitamin D2 by UV irradiation"
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2004.08.022

But then, they were just exposing the external tissues of the mushroom, while the enzymatic conversion in-vivo would be working on individual molecules...
 
Also:
"Optimizing vitamin D2 in mushrooms: pilot study to expose mushrooms to ultraviolet light"
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ZQQ/is_/ai_n24993039
 

Ron
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 Posted: Sat Dec 20th, 2008 17:13

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Dr Trevor Marshall wrote: 
"Even the level of ergosterol in a yeast rich Weiss bier (4.5 µg/330 mL) was still negligible compared to the recommended daily amount, which is of the order of grams"
Er, no, actually the 200IU US RDA of Vit D is about 5 micrograms of Vitamin D total from all sources :X


Damn.. there goes my Weihenstephaner...

Merry Christmas to all of you!

Ron

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 Posted: Sun Dec 21st, 2008 09:21

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Would that mean they have the same effect,

that D2 is not "inferior" to D3, 

or what does the higher potency of D3 to D2  mean ??

 

 



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Frans
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 Posted: Sun Dec 21st, 2008 09:35

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geirf wrote: Would that mean they have the same effect,

that D2 is not "inferior" to D3, 

or what does the higher potency of D3 to D2  mean ??


I think it also depends if the same enzymes convert D2 to 1,25D2. eg Cyp27A1 and Cyp27B1 ?

Frans



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 Posted: Sun Sep 13th, 2009 13:58

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I have sarcoidosis and weisse beer is the only beer the cause a reaction in me similar to spending too much time in the sun or eating salmon,



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 Posted: Sun Sep 13th, 2009 19:53

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I am also curious about baked products that rely on yeast (bread), is there a similar/related expected outcome (Ergosterol)?

Best to all--Janet



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Betsy G
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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 00:52

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This explains why I got ill after having a beer several months ago. Who would have thought????

Betsy



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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 07:38

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I am also curious about baked products that rely on yeast (bread), is there a similar/related expected outcome (Ergosterol)?
I suppose it depends on the heat stability of Ergosterol. In beer, especially in the "live yeast" types like wheat beers that are unpasteurized,  there's no heat involved that would degrade any of the yeast products. All the boiling, etc. takes place before fermentation, the yeast is added (and reproduces wildly) after things have cooled down.  With bread, you's have the hot, steam filled interior of the bread during baking.

I'm curious as well, but I don't know about the heat stability of Ergosterol, so I can't really say. Any biochemists care to chime in?




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Cynthia S
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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 14:07

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I am a very regular wheat bread eater, one to two slices per day.  For the last several months I bake my own bread, whole wheat with extra baker's yeast, and my 25D test last month was 11.8 ng/ml.
Cynthia



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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 15:23

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Apparently, there are a few sources I Googled that seem to be aware of the Ergosterol/D2 connection and have been working on the same question (already baked bread and Ergosterol) from a different angle... some even suggest further enhancing D and B vitamin content in products via yeast, including baked bread so yeast/Ergosterol seems to hold up during the baking process.

Interesting that moldy bread was also used in some of the studies. This clearly is a product that has had heat and some time to sit and grow mold after that.




http://tinyurl.com/lcosrv
Determination of ergosterol as an indicator of fungal biomass in various samples using non-discriminating flash pyrolysis

References and further reading may be available for this article. To view references and further reading you must purchase this article.

Ziba Parsia and Tadeusz Górecki, a,
aDepartment of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada


Abstract
Ergosterol is the major sterol constituent of most fungi. Since it is present in negligible amounts in higher plants, it can be used as a chemical marker for the presence of fungal contamination. A number of different ergosterol assays have been developed for the quantification of fungi in various samples. The paper presents the development of a new method for ergosterol detection based on the combination of non-discriminating flash pyrolysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The design of the non-discriminating Py-GC/MS systems assures efficient transfer of high-molecular-weight pyrolysis products to the GC column for separation, followed by analyte detection by MS. The method was tested on different types of samples, including baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), moldy bread, indoor dust, and a leaf infected with powdery mildew. Ergosterol was detected in all these samples at levels ranging from 4 mg/g for the baker's yeast to 6 μg/g for household dust. The main benefits of non-discriminating pyrolysis over other techniques include elimination of the need for sample preparation, small sample size required and short analysis time.

.............

http://tinyurl.com/lqq2zz
"The growth of yeasts slightly increased the ergosterol contents, but did not influence amino acid contents and compositions,..."

..............

http://tinyurl.com/l3z7ty
Categories: Patent Applications  
Novel Vitamin D2 Yeast Preparation, a Method for Producing the Same, and the Use Thereof 
 
Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)
13/06/2008
 The present invention relates to novel yeast. More specifically, a novel yeast that is enriched for Vitamin D. In one aspect, the invention comprises a yeast that retains its gassing power after UV irradiation and that can be used to produce breads and other baked products with significant levels of vitamin D, in particular Vitamin D2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a novel D2 enriched yeast as well methods of using the novel yeast of the invention.

Inventors: Degre; Richard; (St-Bruno, CA) ; Zhang; Zhigen; (Notre-Dame-De-Grace, CA) ; Edwards; Gary; (Montreal, CA) 

.................
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf00028a014

Supercritical fluid extraction and supercritical fluid chromatography of the fungal metabolite ergosterol
First PageHi-Res PDF[591 KB]J. Christopher. Young, David E. Games
J. Agric. Food Chem., 1993, 41 (4), pp 577–581
DOI: 10.1021/jf00028a014
Publication Date: April 1993

Flour, moldy bread, and mushrooms tested.
83% recovery of free ergosterol for spiked bread flour.
Sensitivity on a 1.0-g sample of flour was about 0.05 mug/g. Observed levels of ergosterol ranged from 0.08 mug/g (fresh weight basis) in a cake flour to 14.3 mg/g (freeze-dried basis) in mushroom caps.




I used to make a lot of my own bread too, to avoid the folate issue and have whole grain + known ingredients. But now I am ingesting less yeast as a general rule. Still eat out occasionally with minimal folate+yeast/white bread once in a blue moon, but predominantly do better via pulse/whole grain options without baking or yeast. Your conclusions and dietary results may vary.

Still, until there are more specific data points, I think I'll generally opt out of products that incorporate yeast, baked or not.

What societies don't rely a lot on yeast bread, too. How are they doing?

Best to all--Janet



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jcwat101
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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 19:16

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I would say, though, that at this time, there is not enough evidence to say we need to avoid yeast bread.  Many have had low 25-D who have not avoided it.

One is encouraged to eat a generally low carb diet on the MP, though (but don't make any abrupt changes -- as lowering carbs may increase IP some).  The definition of low carb varies widely, however.

Joyce Waterhouse

 



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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 23:23

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I would like to point out that there are two major types of beer that I know about.  However, I am no beer "expert"... only enjoy the taste of an occasional beer. ;)

One type of beer is that made from wheat, which seems to be in my experience, the most prevalent beer, by number of brands, in the U.S. and maybe in Europe.

The other beer is made from rice.  The Asian beers are generally made from rice...and so is the U.S.'s Budweiser (regular).  That U.S. company makes about a dozen different brands of beer.

I can drink one beer (12oz) of the rice variety without any trouble. But trying even one beer of the wheat beer variety (and different brands) gives me tremendous cramps in the lower legs at night.

I have found that salicylates in all foods give me these cramps, also.

I have no knowledge about the difference in ergocalciferol of the two varieties, if any difference.

Wishing all wellness!  :D

Dark Vader...aka, George 



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 Posted: Wed Sep 16th, 2009 03:56

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I had seen here previously some discussion about possibilities to increase 25D by eating peanut butter and even mustard.

Are there any news about these two particular foods? Although I am trying to avoid it, sometimes I just can't resist peanut butter, not to speak about mustard, which accompanies a lot of meats I am eating.

Should I be more careful with them?




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 Posted: Wed Sep 16th, 2009 14:58

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I think most European beers are made with hops and Barley Malt.

http://www.beer-pages.co.uk/glossary/glossary_a_e.htm#E

http://www.beer-wine.com/category_page.asp?categoryID=21&sectionID=1



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 Posted: Wed Sep 16th, 2009 15:59

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Joyce, you are correct:

"I would say, though, that at this time, there is not enough evidence --"

Even with the studies I cited, I have to agree.

The point, maybe, is not to make a radical food choice for or against at this time, but likely to enhance awareness and observe outcomes over a period of time, much like George has noted. And, like I said, it is very difficult to avoid bread altogether, so I just switch out yeast products when possible. My 25D has always been low, even when yeast bread that I made myself was daily food group stuff.

If your observation of even changing carbs a little impacts IP, then that is something to consider at some point in time.

I think future of scientific discovery will have plenty of MP-inspired "food for thought" at least, after more modeling and clinical data has been researched for a number of different food groups and sub groups. (Scientists, please form an orderly line and start your engines...?)

Best to all--Janet



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Jon Paul Jones
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 Posted: Tue Dec 15th, 2009 15:44

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I have been weak willed and have been consuming beer, usually lager which according to this thread is low in ergosterol. My 25d taken about two weeks ago was 7ng/ml. My understanding has been that if your 25d is low, you're good, but you all are talking about D2, D3, and ergosterol, so is there some other way beer could be interfering with the MP even if your 25d is really low?



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jrfoutin
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 Posted: Wed Dec 16th, 2009 08:34

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JPJ,

Just some thoughts about food here. These ideas don't directly answer your question, but might have some merit in discussions about food:

1. Most of what anyone discusses about food seems to focus on individual components of the "whole" package of content ingested, and also out of context with typical combination properties (meal recipes and menus), seasonal implications on content, and subcategory issues like production, storage, handling, preparation, etc.

2. Dr Marshall and team have noted components in a relatively limited number of foods that present glaring red flags with regard to the Marshall Pathogenesis. Molecular models help verify those few statements.

3. Olmesartan affinities for those on the MP vs those not on the MP, compared to flagged food component affinities (which one or more outcomes is likely to happen when components are ingested for both those on the MP and those not on the MP) might help clarify dietary discussions. But for now, it may not be the biggest problem the ARF, and those who support the ARF, face in rolling out the Pathogenesis and Protocol to mainstream scientific, medical and consumer mindsets.

4. Habit and/or family/social/regional/other preferences for some MP flagged food items persist. But if problematic food consumption is a major contributor to environmental conditions that lead to Th1 plague in humans, then one might want to consider their place, now, in making hard "change" choices about preferences for themselves as well as the example they set for their immediate family and social network of friends and co-workers.

As for me, I avoid D sources like the plague, and try to keep other problem foods down to once a week, in reserved moderation. If I blow my own rules (knowingly or inadvertantly--'Just what is in this tasty family celebration recipe, aunt Betty?'), then I get back on track and choose better the next meal, grateful that some clues that can help me with food rules I want to make for my life are already on MP websites (and also based on what I found about myself during immunopathological response time frames).

You might even chart food with medications and your IP responses.

Best to you JPJ--Janet



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