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Every week brings more bad news for Vitamin D
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  ...  Next Page Last Page  
 

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PatsyAnn
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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 14:03

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Hi Joyful - I'm getting lost among the various sites right now . . . If you can direct me to the best site for posting, I'd appreciate it. Sallie sent me a link, but it didn't work with my computer for some reason. Guess I should stick to this site (?)

I believe it was you who had posted a request for us to look at a 23-pg article recently published. I found it very interesting, though a bit taxing on my non-science-oriented brain! Started to set up the printer for it, discovered I have to go buy more printer ink - then my laptop ran out of power & all was lost to a black screen. . . grrrr! Don't want to lose the article. Could you please post its title again?



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Sallie Q
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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2013 16:46

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sorry Patsy-Ann, Joyful is taking a holiday, will likely be back to answer queries in April

Although you can see your posts in this vitamin D bad news thread when you are not logged in, you need to be logged in for your link here to work
your progress thread in the Getting Started forum, the last reply you made to it was in June.
PatsyAnn's Progress

Alternatively you can right click on your own name at left, then click on (Topics) to get the list of topics you started. Your progress thread can always be found there
best
Sallie




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Nyima
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 Posted: Wed Mar 6th, 2013 23:01

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Interesting...

http://jcp.bmj.com/content/early/2013/02/28/jclinpath-2012-201301.short



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scooker48
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 Posted: Thu Mar 7th, 2013 06:16

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Hypovitaminosis D may be the consequence rather than cause of chronic inflammatory diseases.

Good find...



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NickBowler
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 Posted: Wed Mar 20th, 2013 08:36

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Vitamin D in pregnancy



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bongocongo
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 Posted: Thu Mar 21st, 2013 01:59

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How pathetic that the researchers have to be apologetic about their finding and feel they had to give a boost to vitamin D supplementation although nothing to do with their study. Fear seems to be as rife in science as it is in business.



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k
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 Posted: Fri Mar 22nd, 2013 17:01

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I can't help but comment in response to the title of this thread that in Australia at least, every week seems to bring a new celebrity, a new newspaper / TV / radio segment, new commercial endorsing Vitamin D.  Sigh!



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Fri Mar 22nd, 2013 20:33

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Well, yes, but the topic is "many see the glass as half full." You are telling us about the ones that can't even see :) :) :) Maybe they will figure out to open their eyes someday.

Like the Oz doctor who wrote me today that I "seemed to have disappeared off the radar."  He needs a bigger antenna, perhaps :) :) :)
 

k
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 Posted: Fri Mar 22nd, 2013 23:44

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Yes, you are right Dr Marshall.

Forgive me, rather neuro-herxy today (and so feeling depressed/dismayed/discouraged).

And hey, if people are going to take Kerri-Anne Kennelly's advice on medical issues - be it on their own heads!!! ;)

Last edited on Fri Mar 22nd, 2013 23:45 by k



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sat Mar 23rd, 2013 00:01

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Don't be downcast. Look at it this way. At some point in the future, the harm done by Vitamin D supplementation to our society, to a great portion of the developed World, will be recognized. There will be countries, such as Russia, who have truly competent scientists -- countries which have resisted this 'sliver bullet'. And the contrast between them and us will make the mistake glaringly obvious.

So what will be the result? In my opinion, it will be the end of evidence based medicine. This fad (EBM) that started halfway through my career - the delusion that one can figure out what a drug or therapy is doing merely by observing, not needing any understanding. EBM has always been on thin ice, but the Vitamin D fiasco should put the final nail in its coffin. Mankind cannot continue to waste generations to this concept that Medicine knows everything about the human body, and can second guess what metabolites, hormones, etc, need to be 'replaced' when the body becomes ill.

You may have noticed that I have been honored by both the Brussels and Moscow based organizations for Predictive and Preventive medicine. What these groups are studying is exactly that. How can we turn the current palliative medical paradigm into something which delivers affordable health care for the 21st century... So please don't despair...
 

mvanwink5
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 Posted: Sat Mar 23rd, 2013 02:11

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Dr. Marshall,
Does the turn of focus to Russia mean the direct approach to change medicine in the US has excessively bogged down and change will have to come from outside scientists (such as from Russia)? It kind of sounded like that from "high frustration level vibes" after your last DC trip. Did the FDA PO process hit a wall or is it just typical red tape delay?



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titta
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 Posted: Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 10:42

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Low Vitamin D, Later CVD: Not True, in Diabetes Study
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/781876?src=nl_topic&uac=147090FY

Titta




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scooker48
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 Posted: Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 10:46

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Titta,

A password is required?

Sherry



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titta
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 Posted: Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 10:54

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Low Vitamin D, Later CVD: Not True, in Diabetes StudyMarlene Busko
Apr 03, 2013
     
      Contrary to what prior research suggests, vitamin-D deficiency did not predict early signs of cardiovascular disease in an observational study of patients with type 1 diabetes.
      The study, based on data from around 1200 participants from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial /Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC), was published online March 25 in Diabetes Care.
      In fact, patients in their 30s with type 1 diabetes and a vitamin-D deficiency tended to have a lower — not higher — risk for coronary artery calcium (CAC) 10 years later, when they were in their 40s. In addition, plasma levels of 3 vitamin-D metabolites were not associated with carotid intima media thickness (IMT).
      These findings "should be viewed with caution," the authors write. "We're not ready to accept these results as definitive, but they're important to publish," lead author Michael C. Sachs, PhD, from the University of Washington, Seattle, told Medscape Medical News. "The bottom line is…that more research is needed to determine how cardiovascular disease, specifically coronary artery disease, develops over time."
      Asked to comment on the study, JoAnn E. Manson, MD, from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, and director of the Vitamin D and Omega-3 Trial (VITAL), had a slightly different take on the prior work. She told Medscape Medical News in an e-mail that the new findings "aren't surprising, because the research studies to date have been inconsistent and inconclusive.
      "The enthusiasm for high-dose vitamin-D supplementation is far outpacing the scientific evidence…[and] it remains far from conclusive that higher intake of vitamin D or higher blood levels of vitamin D will prevent heart disease, cancer, or other chronic illnesses," she added. Her large, randomized trial VITAL should help clarify the effect of vitamin D on cardiovascular disease; results are not expected until 2016 or 2017, however.
      Could Findings Be Due to Youth of Trial Participants?
      Patients with type 1 diabetes often have premature atherosclerosis, and some studies have suggested that the atherosclerosis may be partly due to impaired vitamin-D metabolism, Dr. Sachs and colleagues write.
      They analyzed plasma samples obtained around 1992, from 1193 participants in the DCCT — about equal numbers of men and women who had had type 1 diabetes about 7.5 years and had a mean age of 32 years.
      They determined plasma levels of 3 vitamin-D metabolites: 25-hydroxyvitamin D, a measure of vitamin-D intake; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, a measure of vitamin-D activity; and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin, a measure of vitamin-D turnover.
      About 10 years after these blood tests, the participants underwent computed tomography imaging to measure CAC.
      They also had B-mode ultrasonography scans in 1994 and again about 6 years later to measure changes in internal and common carotid artery IMT.
      Even after adjustment for multiple confounders, there was no link between levels of vitamin-D metabolites and subsequent signs of subclinical cardiovascular disease.
      According to Dr. Sachs, these conflicting results could be due to the current study population being young and relatively healthy, apart from their type 1 diabetes. So they were perhaps not old enough to manifest atherosclerosis, he suggested.
      This study was supported by grants from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.
      Diabetes Care. Published online March 25, 2013. Abstract







      http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2013/03/20/dc12-2020.abstract



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      stuckpac
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       Posted: Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 11:07

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      Don't you just love it when all these authors try to explain away results they don't expect or don't like.....

      Quote: "According to Dr. Sachs, these conflicting results could be due to the current study population being young and relatively healthy, apart from their type 1 diabetes. So they were perhaps not old enough to manifest atherosclerosis, he suggested."

      ChrisMavo
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       Posted: Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 11:38

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      Yeah, right!  A member of our family just had a heart attack at 42 ... so there goes the "too young" argument right out the window. 

      When will it dawn on mainstream medicine that this whole vitamin D supplementation craze is just that ... CRAZY????

      Good health,
      Chris



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      Bane
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       Posted: Fri Apr 12th, 2013 06:37

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      Supplementation with High Doses of Vitamin D to Subjects without Vitamin D Deficiency May Have Negative Effects: Pooled Data from Four Intervention Trials in Tromsø.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23577264

      Data were pooled from four randomized clinical trials with vitamin D performed in Tromsø with weight reduction, insulin sensitivity, bone density, and depression scores as endpoints. Serum lipids, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, (HS-CRP) were measured at baseline and after 6-12 months of supplementation with vitamin D 20 000 IU-40 000 IU per week versus placebo. A total of 928 subjects who completed the interventions were included. At baseline the mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level in those given vitamin D was 55.9 (20.9) nmol/L and the mean increase was 82.4 (40.1) nmol/L. Compared with the placebo group there was in the vitamin D group at the end of the studies a slight, but significant, increase in HbA1c of 0.04%, an increase in HS-CRP of 0.07 mg/L in those with serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L, and in those with low baseline HDL-C and serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L a slight decrease serum HDL-C of 0.08 mmol/L (P < 0.05). No serious side-effects were seen. In conclusion, in subjects without vitamin D deficiency, there is no improvement in serum lipids, HbA1c, or HS-CRP with high dose vitamin D supplementation. If anything, the effect is negative.

      Ron
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       Posted: Fri Apr 19th, 2013 01:49

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      Vitamin D supplementation in elderly or postmenopausal women: a 2013 update of the 2008 recommendations from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23320612

      "The ESCEO recommends that 50 nmol/L (i.e. 20 ng/mL) should be the minimal serum 25-(OH)D concentration"

      "supplementation is recommended at 800 to 1000 IU/day"

      "Vitamin D supplementation is safe up to 10,000 IU/day"

      "in fragile elderly subjects [...] the ESCEO recommends a minimal serum 25-(OH)D level of 75 nmol/L (i.e. 30 ng/mL)"

      :shock::X:shock::X:shock:

      leroybrown
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       Posted: Fri Apr 19th, 2013 05:19

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      Whoops - looks like they didn't measure 1,25D!



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      PoochyMama
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       Posted: Mon Apr 29th, 2013 20:03

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      Article on new guidelines



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