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Smoking, Nicotine
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
 

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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 14:16

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Now that we understand the large size of the cigarette-microbiome (Amy and I have included a slide on that in each of our recent presentations) we can start contemplate an interesting question"

"Is tobacco the cause of disease, or does disease cause sick people to use it for palliation of their condition"

Here is a paper sent to me this morning which contemplates a similar, but not identical, issue:

http://bit.ly/dXgACU

..Trevor..

Limburg
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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 14:35

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Now I can no longer hide behind my smokey curtain, I'm a smoker for 35 years......

Already heard you talking about the microbiome in tobacco before, but still a smoker.

Smoking may have increased my risk of getting MS, I actually got diagnosed.

I have heard in Holland a vaccin against smoking is developed, the trials are very promising, maybe I need it too, cannot stop smoking by myself.....



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Freddie Ash
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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 15:34

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HI ALL

This is Fred in WV.  When smoking comes up when I am talking to people about these TH1 diseases, I tell them that smoking does not cause them but makes more inflammation in their bodies when makes  the disease worse after they get the disease.  Smoking causes more inflammation in their bodies. 

I never smoked or drank and when I was diagnosed with the sarc the doctor said it was a good thing because I would be in much worse shape than I was already in. The doctor told me my lungs looked like some one that was a cronic smoker.

I feel the same with cancer and smoking or even heart disease.

Remember, we are all in this together and I am pulling for us.

Your friend in Sarcoidosis
Freddie



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Phillyguy
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 Posted: Fri Feb 11th, 2011 20:32

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Toxicol. Sci. 2009 May; vol. 109(1) pp. 50-8

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor activator benzo[a]pyrene enhances vitamin D3 catabolism in macrophages.

Matsunawa M, Amano Y, Endo K, Uno S, Sakaki T, Yamada S, Makishima M
Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon produced by cigarette combustion, is implicated as a causative agent in smoking-related cancer and atherosclerosis. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], a potent ligand for the nuclear receptor vitamin D receptor (VDR), has been shown to decrease the risk of osteoporosis, some types of cancer and cardiovascular disease, suggesting an opposing effect of vitamin D3 to cigarette smoking. In this study, we investigated the effects of BaP on the vitamin D3 signaling pathway. BaP effectively enhanced the 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent induction of cytochrome P450 24A1 (CYP24A1) in human monocyte/macrophage-derived THP-1 cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. BaP combination was less or not effective on mRNA expression of CD14, arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase, and cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in THP-1 cells. BaP also increased the expression of CYP24A1 induced by a non-vitamin D VDR ligand, lithocholic acid acetate. Another aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, enhanced CYP24A1 expression by 1,25(OH)2D3 in THP-1 cells. Treatment of cells with an AhR antagonist and a protein synthesis inhibitor inhibited the enhancing effect of BaP on CYP24A1 induction, indicating that the effects of BaP are mediated by AhR activation and de novo protein synthesis. BaP pretreatment increased 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent recruitment of VDR and retinoid X receptor to the CYP24A1 promoter. Analysis of 1,25(OH)2D3 metabolism showed that BaP enhanced the hydroxylation of 1,25(OH)2D3 by CYP24A1 in THP-1 cells. Thus, AhR activation by BaP stimulates vitamin D3 catabolism. Modulation of vitamin D signaling by AhR may represent a mechanism underlying cigarette smoking-related diseases.

rick
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 Posted: Mon Feb 14th, 2011 20:54

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I used tobacco to palliate my condition, the bigger the herx the more I smoked. (Stupid)

We all know tobacco is bad but have a think about the pathogens in fruit and vegetables that are irrigated with reclaimed water used for fertigation? Not everyone smokes but the majority eat vegies

I have seen vegetables grown commercially in a reclaimed water hydroponic system where the filtration system becomes blocked with a slimy biofilm up to half an inch thick, Easy to fix, just take off the filters!  I’ve worked on one of these commercial systems and became acutely ill.  Think about it, this is effluent supplied from human sewage; just imagine the plethora of hormones and abx residual supplied in that anaerobic pathogenic slurry. Feed the overpopulated hordes at what cost? 
The government has been considering reclaimed water in Australia for domestic drinking supplies; some places are already hooked up to a grey water supply for their gardens, anyone for a glass of estrogenized water and a smoke



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rick
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 Posted: Mon Feb 14th, 2011 21:50

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This may be of interest to any electronic geeks, tobacco mosaic virus has a unique property.

http://green.autoblog.com/2010/12/23/university-researches-battery-applications-tobacco-mosaic-virus/



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wrotek
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 Posted: Sun Mar 13th, 2011 04:44

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I had no problems stopping smoking after getting sick. Before, small amount of tobacco, 3-5 cigarettes a day, made me feel better. Now nauseated and dull. My brother has shisha water pipe and sometimes he fires it up, so I take some puffs since it smells nice and it is not making me dull. Perhaps the water filtration system works removing heavier constituents of tobacco or the smoke is simply less condensed. Also my father uses electronic cigarette which vaporizes pure nicotine , which is also not making me dull and perhaps little energetic - like shisha.



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Milan
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 Posted: Sun Mar 13th, 2011 09:27

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When I got very sick of CFS/IBS , even smallest amount of tobacco smoke would cause me ringing in the ears , brain fog and stomach symptoms , sometimes it would cause me diarrhea or bloating.I was running away from smoke as far as I could.I stopped contacting all my friends that smoked and I didn't talk with my sisters husband .He got offended every time he comes to our house and when he start smoking and I don't even come to see and say hello to him and my sister and her two daughters.We in family don't smoke and then he comes and fill ours living room full of tobacco smoke.My mother and father were afraid to tell him not to smoke when he is in our house because than he could get offended and it would worsen relationship between two families.



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eClaire
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 Posted: Sun Mar 13th, 2011 21:01

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No location shows up under your name, but I am thinking you live outside the US or at least far from the part of the US where I live where it is very common for cigarette smoke to be banned from the home even when there is a smoker living there.  A friend of mine smokes and she never smokes in her own home.  My mother smokes and does not smoke in her own home.  They smoke outside out of consideration of anyone who visits, knowing that the smoke smell is off putting to many visitors.

I banned smoking from my home in 1979.  This is now so common as to be expected by most people that I meet. 

I hope your family can find a way to deal with this as people have a right to be comfortable in their own homes. 



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Sallie Q
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 Posted: Mon Mar 14th, 2011 00:16

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nice to see you online Claire

Our family is similar, four of my five smoke (two heavily) but always outside my house and usually outside their own

our climate helps, of course :)



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Joyful
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 Posted: Sun Feb 5th, 2012 13:12

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Not a study on smoking, just on nicotine...

Nicotine: a different approach to treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

Gothe B, Strohl KP, Levin S, Cherniack NS.

Abstract Reduced upper airway muscle activity may contribute to the occurrence of obstructive apneas during sleep. There is no uniformly successful treatment of these apneas, and it is possible that agents which increase upper airway muscle activity could reduce the occurrence of obstruction during sleep. Nicotine, a known stimulant of breathing, also increases the activity of muscles which dilate the upper airway proportionally more than it does ventilation. Hence, we evaluated the effect of nicotine on apneas during the first two hours of sleep in eight patients with sleep apnea syndrome. It was concluded that nicotine reduces apneas during the early hours of sleep, and this effect may be caused by its stimulating action on upper airway muscles.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3965253 



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eClaire
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 Posted: Sun Feb 5th, 2012 14:25

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Very interesting. Though it is said that those of us with ME/CFS lack oxygen on a cellular level, in my early 30s I developed functional back pain as a result of crossing my arms behind my head, particularly in my sleep (but also when I was awake), which over extended my spine and caused a lot of pain. Thing is I could breathe better with my upper airways lifted.

A friend with ME/CFS has recently started smoking again and the amount of energy she has and the quality of her life improved dramatically.

Are our experiences coincidental or is there really something to the upper airway that in peculiar in people with ME/CFS?

Of course, many of us are sensitive to cigarette smoke and so that would not be the answer and I've known someone whose FM seemed to be triggered by nicotine patches (when she was trying to quit smoking).

I have no doubt this is not a permanent solution (as nicotine might operate via other properties other than what is assumed--that is, my friend might be palliating her symptoms with nicotine), but it's interesting nevertheless.

Last edited on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 14:27 by eClaire



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Joyful
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 Posted: Sun Feb 5th, 2012 18:49

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Thanks for those comments Claire.

I noticed that my shoulders curved down more when I was at my worst. A physical therapist taught me to stand in a corner of the room putting my hands on the walls at chest height and pushing into the corner to stretch out the upper chest area.

I've also noticed I feel better if I tap my fists alternately left/right over my upper chest area for a minute or so. (Kind of like a Tarzan thumping.) It might help calm the nervous system.

Last edited on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 18:50 by Joyful



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eClaire
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 Posted: Sun Feb 5th, 2012 19:55

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I had to do that same exercise to lengthen the muscles in my chest wall Joyful after being so sick for so long. And my shoulders still round when hit with neurological symptoms that feign complete and instant exhaustion. For example, my mother has a light in her hallway that acts like Kryptonite to me. It takes me a long time to recover from it visually and physically. I can feel my body bending under it. It's one of those canned lights, but something must be wrong with it because I have canned lights in my kitchen and have no trouble at all.



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Joyful
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 Posted: Sun Feb 5th, 2012 22:12

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Flickering lights can really put my nervous system over the edge!



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 Posted: Mon Feb 6th, 2012 02:47

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Joyful wrote: Flickering lights can really put my nervous system over the edge
One of the areas of the brain that processes the signal from each eye is devoted to detecting movement (other areas process colour and so on), everybody detects motion to a slightly different degree so it may be that you are more sensitive than most.

Across the population the average fusion threshold, above which flickering becomes no longer discernible, is about 90 Hz, but some people respond to flicker up to about 150Hz, which can cause major problems under halophosphate lighting which flickers at twice the AC frequency i.e. 120Hz in th US and 100Hz in countries with a 50Hz electrical system.  The modulation depth of the flicker can vary and also has considerable variation across the colour spectrum, so there are plenty of reasons why you may be sensitive to some lights but not others.

Twenty years ago I worked on a research study into exactly that, but it was funded by Thorn EMI and as soon as we showed conclusively that their lights were causing considerable harm the research got shut down.  I have said before what I think of the state of modern science, and it started with that experience.



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Joyful
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 Posted: Mon Feb 6th, 2012 14:28

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Good to know. Thanks for explaining that. :)



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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 18:07

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My grandfather smoked from the age of 13.
In his later years, he developed sleep apnoea and his doctor suggested stopping smoking, which he did (in his mid 80s). He died only about a year after (stopped breathing in his sleep).
He served in the army and was always working outside on his farms, ate good basic food and he seemed healthy all his years, despite being run over by a tractor twice and having a bit of a limp in his step.

My father follwed suit and is still going strong into his late 60s.

Don't tell me to take up smoking now, cos I already gave up (then got sick!) and I can't stand cigs at all now.

:)



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Joyful
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 Posted: Tue Feb 7th, 2012 18:35

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In your grandfather's case, it would seem that stopping the nicotine inhalation could have contributed to his demise. :?

Do you have sleep apnea, Seth?



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 Posted: Wed Feb 8th, 2012 00:34

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I have sleep apnea ... but I certainly do not intend to take up smoking!!  :D



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