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Smoking, Nicotine
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
 

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wrotek
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 Posted: Wed Feb 8th, 2012 04:30

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I used to be exposed to cigarette smoke since small child, both my parents smoked. I remember driving in a car with my father on holidays, and puking all over it from cigarette smoke.

Lol



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jrfoutin
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 Posted: Thu Feb 9th, 2012 19:45

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From the other Wiki:
Jeanne Calment held the record for verifiable oldest living person, surviving to 122 years. Per smoking: She smoked until the age of 117, only five years before her death. Calment smoked from the age of 21 (1896), though according to an unspecified source, she smoked no more than two cigarettes per day.

Calment ascribed her longevity and relatively youthful appearance for her age to olive oil, which she said she poured on all her food and rubbed onto her skin, as well as a diet of port wine, and ate nearly one kilogram of chocolate every week.
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Discussion:
But you know, she was single for most of her life (husband died of some kind of food poisoning and it isn't really described whether she had had some of the same but it didn't bother her at the time), had financial issues taken care of for her and it could have been the sport of fencing she took up when she was in her 80's.
_____________

Me, personally:
But as for me, I have never smoked and the smell of it gagged me even as a child when I went to a friend's home that had a smoker in the home. I'm old, so smoking in the home was common for smokers to do then.

I don't drink port or anything like it.

A kilo of chocolate is really a lot. :shock: We might guess the mass produced big name stuff with HFCS and/or soy all through it was not what she was eating.

Olive oil varies some from regions where it is grown and soil conditions, so who knows what was in hers. But I put the best I can on my salads and food. I like it better for skin than lotions with who knows what in it. I hope it isn't full of farming chemicals, but unless I grow it in my own garden, I really have a hard time knowing what is in any food.

As far as I can tell, I don't think it was the drink or smoke that kept Jeanne Calment alive, so my bet is she handled stress pretty good, had a fairly dependable routine/diet/lifestyle, and this might be key: wasn't exposed to or just naturally handled a lot of the nasty microbes (but what of the sick artist?) and chocolate and olive oil are probably are OK even if you ingest a lot, although I don't suggest that for anyone.

_________

But at some point in time we'll know more of the MP, and in the mean time, my money isn't on smoking to help anyone. She might have lived longer? Dunno.

Best to all--Janet



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eClaire
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 06:46

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I might also assume she started out with a low pathogen load.

My parents smoked in the home and it made me ill my whole childhood. It took me until my mid 20s to see that without smoke (and VOCs) as a trigger I felt a whole heck of a lot better. Already saddled with issues from birth and ME/CFS symptoms from age 7, I can safely say I probably started out in life with a high pathogen load and I could never have smoked.

Given that tobacco smoked has a lot of bacteria, it doesn't seem like a bright idea. Lots of things have benefits that can eventually get outweighed by the negatives associated with it.




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Lee
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 09:53

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My great aunt lived to be 106.  She passed away last fall after falling and becoming bed fast.  I think if she had not fallen she would still be with us.  She was a grand lady and smoked for most of her adult life.  She did quit about the time she lost her husband in 1980.  She was always a little overweight but loved to eat and ate well.  She did drink a little wine and even beer.  She loved a taste of ice cream in the evenings or a "sweet".  She lived most of her life just outside NYC where she made slipcovers and draperies for wealthy.  She was not wealthy but had plenty ...:cool:  She never had any children and we always considered her the "stern auntie" even though she did smile a lot.  She did retire to Fl and lived with my cousin and they loved the sunshine and her pool until the last few years of her life.  My cousin is a nurse and made sure that she avoided mainstream meds.  I remember my cousin fighting to keep her off things like Lipitor!   She did use a little aspirin, thyroid and hydrocodone in her later years.  She loved her  small pups and always had at least one at her feet and one in her lap ...:cool:   We miss her!  Lee



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leroybrown
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 11:43

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You always hear reports about that 1 or 2 people in a zillion that smoked like a chimney, drank like a fish, ate everything bad, and then lived to be 120 or something. I wonder if they had supercharged VDRs or just got lucky?

Some people get all the luck! My money's not on smoking, drinking or even chocolate :X  (wah!)

Deb



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Lee
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 11:51

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Many of the women on my mom's side of the family lived long healthy lives.  I wonder why my sis and I did not get the good genes ...:X  But ...we did have to live with these healthy women that smoked too ...:shock:  Could second hand smoke be worse than first hand?   I have heard this.  Plus my sis and I had many vaccinations our elders did not have.  I had to have TWO small pox because the first did not scar ....outrageous!!   Lee



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leroybrown
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 12:01

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That is outrageous as well as totally unfair. I don't think I had small pox vaccine (born in 1964) but I remember the big scar my grandmother had on her arm.

I like that your aunt had pups though.

I used to smoke, but wish I never did.

Deb



____________________
I just know that something good is going to happen
And I don't know when - Kate Bush
Aplastic anemia Apr/10, PRCA Jan/09, Agranulocytosis 1991
25D = 25 1,25D = 58 Aug 18/09|25D<4.8 Mar/10|10.8 Nov/12
Sep '09 q8h Nov '09 q6h
Paisleykilt
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 17:06

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Just when I too am lamenting coming from the shallow end of the gene pool (a family plagued with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, brain tumours, high blood pressure, depression and autism spectrum disorders) I remember my maternal grandfather, a WWI veteran who survived close encounters with a bullet, bomb, & torpedo, smoked two packs of Woodbines/day for over 75 years, drank rum every evening, immigrated to Canada at the age of 70, became assistant golf pro at a prestigious golf course, remarried at 80, and when he outlived that wife, had two girlfriends trying to lure him off the golf course until the month before he died, predictably, of lung cancer.

Now I realise I have 1/4 chance of living to be a grand old age!

I won't be taking up arms or smoking any time soon, but perhaps I should rethink the golf, rum, and lovers?   :P:shock::P



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Cynthia S
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 Posted: Fri Feb 10th, 2012 18:07

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I wonder what percentage of the centenarian women never had children.

Cynthia



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Lee
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 Posted: Sat Feb 11th, 2012 03:05

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I wonder that too Cynthia ....:P  Lee (mom of three)



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Sunset
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 Posted: Sat Feb 11th, 2012 07:31

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Cynthia wrote: I wonder what percentage of the centenarian women never had children.

I had a Great Aunt who lived to 101. She didn't smoke, never had children, lived in the same area of NY her whole life and I don't believe she ever held a job except maintaing her own house. I don't know whether or not her husband smoked. He died when I was really young. But basically she lived a very low stress life and she didn't travel much. She outlived her husband by at least three decades. She was healthy well into her late 90's, then she was diagnosed with Lyme Disease.

As for me, the first 14 years of my life I was exposed to second hand smoke because my dad was a smoker. Just like Wrotek, I too would puke in the car when we travelled anywhere. My parents thought I just had motion sickness, but in hindsight I believe it was all the smoke in the car. :X

My mother had her first three children in a 3 year period (my oldest sister was born in July 1967 and I, the 3rd child, was born in July 1970). We were all full-term, but low-birth weight babies. Me and my siblings all developed allergies/sensitivities (both food and environmental) at very young ages. My dad use to say he couldn't understand why we always had colds, oh if only he had realized that his smoking was part of the problem! :shock::shock::shock:

Just out of curiosity I did try cigarettes when I was a teen, but I didn't like them.

IMHO, some people are fortunate enough to get a healthy start in life and have live a low stress life (low bacteria load & low stress levels) and some of us are not.

Best regards,
Sunset



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Lee
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 Posted: Sat Feb 11th, 2012 13:03

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My mother was amazed that mys sis and I too had more colds, flu's and allergies than she ever had.  I seriously think it was because she was not around smokers as a child like we were plus she never had near the vaccinations etc.  My sis and I endured many more shots like tetnus & thyphoid due to having horses and water skiing in dubious waters near our home.  We also had stress from living with a WW2 vet (our dad) that had lost his leg and general health from the war.  Parents eventually divorced but not before my sis and I witnessed plenty of anger and ptss from him and directed at us ....:(  This was probably as bad as the 2nd hand smoke etc.  Lee



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MP-Feb05 ABX Breaks 7mth,18mth,3yr,5yr 2003 Sarc, Hyper-flex FM, Hashimotos, COPD, skin, joint pain and Glaucoma. 2014 blood work normal D-levels 4-5.
wrotek
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 Posted: Tue Mar 12th, 2013 14:12

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I wonder if cannabis has microbiome and if it differs from that in tobacco.



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Tue Mar 12th, 2013 14:27

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Yes, all plants have a microbiome, and because cannabis is grown and process differently from tobacco, it would be unusual if that microbiome was substantially similar.
 

jrfoutin
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 Posted: Tue Mar 12th, 2013 14:59

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With a fairly skin deep google search I found this little snippet that goes nowhere though:

http://home.uchicago.edu/~/mewinsto/research.html

"THE CANNABIS MICROBIOME

Bacterial interactions within the soil play a major role in plant ecology, as soil microorganisms can provide a variety of benefits such as nitrogen fixation, production of growth stimulants, improved water retention, and suppression of root diseases. Frequently, these vital microbial processes occur within the diverse community of the rhizosphere and rhizoplane due to their higher interaction with the plant root system, and are heavily influenced by fungal saprotrophs and plant-mutualists such as endomycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Despite the economic and medicinal importance of Cannabis, little is known about its microbial associations within the soil environment. A survey of the microbial communities associated with several different strains of Cannabis offers us insight into the edaphic and cultivar-specific factors that control the microbiome composition."



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