The Marshall Protocol Study Site Home

Search
   
Members

Calendar

Help

Home
Search by username
   Not logged in - Login | Register 


High levels of resistant bacteria found in Meat
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
 

New Topic

Reply

Print
AuthorPost
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15484
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 09:57

Quote

Reply
 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/15/us-food-bacteria-study-idUSTRE73E65L20110415
 
So now we know.
For sure, not just guessing :)

..Trevor..

ps: If the FDA know the bacteria are "always going to be there" and that they are antibiotic resistant, then surely these bacteria would be harmful, de-facto? Is the FDA admitting that they already know in-vitro studies of activity and resistance of bacteria bear no resemblance to the in-vivo environment?
 

Verena
Member*


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 1110
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 10:50

Quote

Reply
Trevor,

thank you for the link. It does not really come as a surprise. Especially that turkey is the animal with the heaviest load. Not going into details here, though...

Since ages I am trying to figure out, which Antibiotics are beeing used on the farms, but the only information I got so far is "Antibiotics". Is there a possibility to get informations about the actual types beeing used? Are they using Tetracyclines f.e.?

Best, Verena

Last edited on Fri Apr 15th, 2011 10:50 by Verena



____________________
*1973, Migraine s. 1976, Eye Inflammation 1992 - 2011, Multiple Sclerosis s. 2007, MP 10/09 - 05/15, Restart 10/15
jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4860
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 13:40

Quote

Reply
Brief report article:

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/04/14/cid.cir181.full.pdf

Conflicts of interest statement seen at end of article written by Lance B. Price et al. This article is currently being cited differently over major news outlets, so feel free to get informed at the source. 

Notice figure 2 Phylogenetic relationships. Turkey, pork and chicken each sport a dominant different resistance spectrum (even beef has a dominant pattern, but it seems to be a good place to find a more balanced risk mix of many).

I only point that out because a lot of media articles are citing turkey meat as a real big problem, but the way I see it, beef has a more even distribution across many different strains. Knowing how these little beasties like to work together in teams, I'd worry more about raw beef coming on with a well-trained team effort.

The antibiotics to which the staph was resistant included: penicillin and ampicillin; erythromycin; tetracycline; oxacillin, the more modern form of the drug methicillin; the drug combination quinupristin/dalfopristin, known as Synercid; the fluoroquinolones levofloxacin (Levaquin) and ciprofloxacin (Cipro); and the last-resort drugs for very serious staph infections vancomycin and daptomycin. One staph isolate was resistant to nine different antibiotics.

I'll have another round of olmesartan, instead, please.

CNN's Maria Cohen said it was a "touch" infection problem. Eating cooked meat (ingest no raw meat) and preparing food with careful clean handling was her recommendation.

Terms for "flesh eating" drug-resistant bacteria often include:
MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus)
HA-MRSA (hospital acquired Methicillin-resistant S. aureus)
CA-MRSA (community acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus)

I still think the only way to win personally and collectively as a society is to fully enable everyone's immune system, and learning to work with the environment we are in. But that's just conjecture and speculation on my part after reading a raft of articles about bacteria, virus, fungii, pleomorphs and the like for the last 6 years.

Choose well, get well--Janet



____________________
Sarcoidosis 125D61, MP10/05 ModP2 12/05 Ph2 6/06 Ph3 10/06, NoIRs limited outings covered, 2/08 25D6.2, 10/08 25D6.9
Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4010
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 14:26

Quote

Reply
Seems like those with a leaky gut mentioned in another thread are at the biggest risk, as the bacteria can enter the blood stream/internal tissues without even a how-do-you-do from the immune system.  Cynthia



____________________
MP start 10/08,break 1/16 - 9/16, Spondylitis'97,early Diverticulosis'98,early AMD'08,Calcium anomaly'95,TypeII Diabetes(?)'02,Degenerative hip disease'12, 25D=10.8 May'18 (preMP 125D/25D=47/43) https://marshallprotocol.com/forum30/13911-2.html
ChrisMavo
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 1st, 2009
Location: San Francisco, California USA
Posts: 885
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 14:59

Quote

Reply
Interesting!  So the CWD bacteria that caused my ALS probably came from all that rare steak I used to eat!!

With the current sushi craze, especially here on West Coast, they should do this same study on seafood. 



____________________
PLS/ALS, speech difficulty, dizziness, leg weakness, overly emotional, Ph1Aug2609,11/2012 25D-12, 11/11: 25D-10, 04/11: 25D-11, 07/10: 25D-13, 05/10: 25D-15, 11/09: 25D-20, 9/09: 25D-27, 7/09: 25D-38, 1,25D-46, Mod Ph2Oct09, 100mg Mino
Verena
Member*


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 1110
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Apr 16th, 2011 05:00

Quote

Reply
The antibiotics to which the staph was resistant included: penicillin and ampicillin; erythromycin; tetracycline; oxacillin, the more modern form of the drug methicillin; the drug combination quinupristin/dalfopristin, known as Synercid; the fluoroquinolones levofloxacin (Levaquin) and ciprofloxacin (Cipro); and the last-resort drugs for very serious staph infections vancomycin and daptomycin. One staph isolate was resistant to nine different antibiotics.
Oh my god....



____________________
*1973, Migraine s. 1976, Eye Inflammation 1992 - 2011, Multiple Sclerosis s. 2007, MP 10/09 - 05/15, Restart 10/15
mvanwink5
Support Team


Joined: Fri Nov 5th, 2010
Location: Newland, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3305
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Apr 16th, 2011 05:52

Quote

Reply
Eating a salad from products that set on the same check out counter ringing up that dripping hamburger package can give you more than you bargained for....



____________________
Lyme joints, EMF sensitive, MP start 8/10; 25D 5.6ng/ml 9/16; vegetarian; olmesartan only-240mg/d, coffee as needed, RF shielding required, My Progress: http://tinyurl.com/z2stwo8
garyv
.


Joined: Wed Feb 13th, 2008
Location: Richmond, Virginia USA
Posts: 164
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Apr 16th, 2011 06:10

Quote

Reply
ChrisMavo wrote: Interesting!  So the CWD bacteria that caused my ALS probably came from all that rare steak I used to eat!!
Not likely, Chris. Heat can actually cause bacteria to convert to the CWD form to survive.

The MP Wiki states:

Markova has provided evidence that E. coli can survive lethal treatments such as boiling or autoclaving (subjecting equipment to high pressure steam at 121 °C or more) by transitioning into the L-form.http://www.biolsci.org/v06p0303.htm

The problem with antibiotic-resistant bacteria in commercial meat is primarily due to growers' routine use of antibiotics mixed into animal feed to prevent their sickly animals from dying.

To maximize profits the current dominant livestock industry keeps its pigs and chickens cooped up in windowless buildings in cages so small they can't turn around, never seeing sunshine or green earth, and forced to breathe noxious, ammonia-fouled air. Its beef cattle are kept in huge malodorous waste-generating feedlots, standing up to their knees in mud and manure, injected with steroids, doused with pesticides, forced to eat a dusty, ground-up ration laced with antibiotics and chicken manure.

There is another way to produce meat which is much tastier and more nutritious and much less contaminated--a way which not only respects the animals and the natural environment they inhabit, but also brings viability to the small family farmer and community scale agriculture. And, most importantly for this discussion, this other way does not require antibiotics.

It's called grass-based farming, and you can view a brief list of its principles here:
http://www.polyfacefarms.com/principles.aspx

This is the farm BTW where I've been getting all my pork and chickens for over 20 years. Joel Salatin was also my mentor when I began raising my own grass-fed beef 16 years ago.

In short, raising animals on fresh fertile green pasture in the open air and sunshine, insures that they live happy stress-free lives with strong immune systems which easily fend off microbes without man's help, just as their predecessors on the Great Prairie, the great thundering herds of bison, did for millennia.

An excellent video about all this is "Food, Inc.," clips of which you can view here:
http://www.ovguide.com/movies_tv/food_inc.htm

BTW Chris, I prefer not to stress my bacteria with heat to push them into converting to CWD forms, so I eat all of this wonderful grass-fed meat and fat completely RAW.:D



Last edited on Sat Apr 16th, 2011 06:17 by garyv



____________________
DxOsteoporosis/osteoarthritis/Raynauds/paresthesia/tinnitus 1,25D69 Ph1Mar08 Ph3Jan09 25D32(May11) no meds or NOIRs, covered in direct sunlight only
"Fear not the path of truth for the lack of people walking on it.” –Arabic proverb
chef bama
Member


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 210
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Apr 16th, 2011 08:09

Quote

Reply
Just another scare story. Big Ag makes a much higher profit from carbs.

Recently I read that Big Ag has to feed cattle their own special "probiotic" mix to help them digest when fed grains rather than grass. I'm curious what that mix is, and how much of it gets in the meat.




____________________
lung granuloma, 4.5cm calcified subcarinal lymph node; 10/09 25D=11 1,25D=35; eliminated D foods 10/09; NoIRs & low light 11/09; started benicar 12/09, started mino 5/2010, 25D=5 9/2010
ChrisMavo
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 1st, 2009
Location: San Francisco, California USA
Posts: 885
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Apr 16th, 2011 11:27

Quote

Reply
Thanks for the interesting post Gary!  We have some good grass-fed meat places here in San Francisco.  I guess we'll start getting our meat products exclusively from them!



____________________
PLS/ALS, speech difficulty, dizziness, leg weakness, overly emotional, Ph1Aug2609,11/2012 25D-12, 11/11: 25D-10, 04/11: 25D-11, 07/10: 25D-13, 05/10: 25D-15, 11/09: 25D-20, 9/09: 25D-27, 7/09: 25D-38, 1,25D-46, Mod Ph2Oct09, 100mg Mino
tammy1000
inactive member
 

Joined: Wed Apr 7th, 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 68
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Apr 17th, 2011 03:25

Quote

Reply
Generally speaking do the bacteria levels in fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, etc. compare with bacterial load in meats?

 



____________________
VitD restr. Dec'08, Problems w/Olm '09-'10, Presently: 40mg Olm @6hrs; 88' Severe MCS/allergies, asthma, cognitive, arthritis, bone loss, periodontal
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15484
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Apr 17th, 2011 06:16

Quote

Reply
tammy1000 wrote: Generally speaking do the bacteria levels in fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, etc. compare with bacterial load in meats?
In general -- I have found anything imported from a known-good source works out well, IMO. Remember that wherever you get them from, all plants or animals will be carrying a microbiota. The key is to find sources which you can enjoy without too many after-effects. Oh - and I use a cetylpyridinium chloride mouthwash several times a day.. :) :) Researchers of the salivary microbiome found (microscopic) wheat plants growing in their subject's mouths...

We buy meat and nuts from Trader Joes. Meat is usually Australian or NZ lamb (which are not battery-farmed) or the occasional imported beef-steak. I have also found TJ's imported  Canadian bacon is pretty innocuous (and sandwiches taste good with minimum effort).

I have personally had to pick and choose nuts from time to time. At one stage they were selling air-roasted peanuts which would give blisters on my tongue if any remnants were left in the mouth. Probably full of bugs, I decided (anecdotally), but generally any of their dry-roasted almonds or cashews seem fine.

Imported cheeses - Trader Joe's sells Dutch Gouda at $4.99 per pound -- are what we use. Fruits tend to be very variable, I try to stick to Bosc pears and Asian pears, but that is primarilly a taste preference... Tropical Papaya is really nice from time to time.

Glass bottled Whole Foods Markets 1%-fat Pasteurized milk (Vit A, but no Vit D added) is our staple milk (Brougiere's factories, I think). TJ's imported Irish butter is nice.
 
Am looking forward to enjoying the Korean beef when we visit Korea in a couple of weeks. I love beef  from Asian sources... In general, I have no trouble eating when traveling, although I have recently started to carry Bactrim with me following a bout of diarrhea after returning from China (once)... Oh and the Shabu-Shabu meal Liz and I enjoyed in Little Tokyo the other day (frozen imported Japanese beef) was reallly, really, nice...
 

chef bama
Member


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 210
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Apr 17th, 2011 09:10

Quote

Reply
I haven't used the imported lamb, TJs or otherwise. for years, because it gives me a queasy nauseous feeling for a day or two afterwards ... have often wondered why. The only clue I have found is that some bacteria can live/multiply at refrigerated & frozen temperatures -- listeria was the main culprit. So although the meat is shipped cold, sitting in its cryovac bag, the bacteria in it continue to multiply in transit.

Last edited on Sun Apr 17th, 2011 09:10 by chef bama



____________________
lung granuloma, 4.5cm calcified subcarinal lymph node; 10/09 25D=11 1,25D=35; eliminated D foods 10/09; NoIRs & low light 11/09; started benicar 12/09, started mino 5/2010, 25D=5 9/2010
ChrisMavo
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 1st, 2009
Location: San Francisco, California USA
Posts: 885
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Apr 17th, 2011 12:26

Quote

Reply
We also shop at Trader Joe's for a lot of our food.  I also enjoy their Organic Dark Chocolate bars!!  Reasonable price, good quality most the time ... and satisfies my sweet tooth!



____________________
PLS/ALS, speech difficulty, dizziness, leg weakness, overly emotional, Ph1Aug2609,11/2012 25D-12, 11/11: 25D-10, 04/11: 25D-11, 07/10: 25D-13, 05/10: 25D-15, 11/09: 25D-20, 9/09: 25D-27, 7/09: 25D-38, 1,25D-46, Mod Ph2Oct09, 100mg Mino
stuckpac
Health Professional
 

Joined: Sat Sep 27th, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 50
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Apr 18th, 2011 06:20

Quote

Reply
I have found the Organic Valley Organic NonFat Dry Milk Powder with no vit. D added to be a reasonable milk substitute when in an area where I can't find any whole milk with no added Vit. D.  You can get it on Amazon....

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4860
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Apr 18th, 2011 14:12

Quote

Reply
Verena,
Antibiotic function on the MP has been noticed by our group. Recent changes in suggestions for abx use on MP reflect that comprehension.

So many expect the solution to be what we take for a quick fix, but preventative may be the solution with long-term enabled immune functionality, instead.

Best to all--Janet

 



____________________
Sarcoidosis 125D61, MP10/05 ModP2 12/05 Ph2 6/06 Ph3 10/06, NoIRs limited outings covered, 2/08 25D6.2, 10/08 25D6.9
TXPam
member


Joined: Sun Mar 13th, 2011
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 313
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu May 17th, 2012 04:54

Quote

Reply
"Reportedly, about 70 percent of the ground beef sold at supermarkets today contains pink slime."

Found this info on "pink slime" featured today on the Ask Dr. Weil website & thought it might be of interest:

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401111/Purging-Pink-Slime.html

We buy organic ground meat & then freeze it before using. But for anyone on a tight budget, or unable to find organic meat in their area, avoiding pink slime may be more challenging.  

 



____________________
MP start Jan'11-Jul 2013(no breaks), then on break | Lyme; Breast Cancer 2002,2013,& 2014; Hiatal Hernia; GERD | touch & food sensitivity; MCS; fatigue |Initial 25D= 21 ng/mL Nov'10|Last 25D= 8 ng/mL, Apr' 2012
eClaire
member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu May 17th, 2012 10:28

Quote

Reply
Trevor wrote: "cetylpyridinium chloride mouthwash several times a day.. :) :) Researchers of the salivary microbiome found (microscopic) wheat plants growing in their subject's mouths..."

Does anyone know any brand names for mouthwash with this in it so I don't have to read every mouthwash label on the shelves?

Also, wheat plants growing in subjects mouths gives a new twist on celiac's disease. :shock:

Thanks, Claire



____________________
Dec 2006, Olmesartan break Feb - April 2007, ME/Fibro/PTSD/MCS/Hypermobility (since childhood; disabled 2003); 25D summer 2012 <4 (meaning unable to detect)
TXPam
member


Joined: Sun Mar 13th, 2011
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 313
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu May 17th, 2012 11:28

Quote

Reply
Hi Claire. In another thread, Dr. M. wrote about this mouthwash:

Crest 'Pro-Health' 'Night'
with the active ingredient, Cetylpyridinium Chloride. Other ingredients were: water, glycerin, flavor (minty), zinc lactate, methylparaben, sodium saccharin, sucralose, propylparaben, poloxamer 407.

Though I can't vouch for whether these are MP-approved, here's a link that may show you more:

http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?id=29775

If you copy "Cetylpyridinium Chloride" into the search box, you'll get additional brands shown, with photos of their ingredients labels. Can't guarantee that every one will have the Cetylpyridinium Chloride, but might make searching for products a bit easier.

 



____________________
MP start Jan'11-Jul 2013(no breaks), then on break | Lyme; Breast Cancer 2002,2013,& 2014; Hiatal Hernia; GERD | touch & food sensitivity; MCS; fatigue |Initial 25D= 21 ng/mL Nov'10|Last 25D= 8 ng/mL, Apr' 2012
findinganswers
member
 

Joined: Wed Dec 20th, 2006
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 354
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun May 20th, 2012 17:13

Quote

Reply
The first time I used Crest Pro-Health Multi-Protection Rinse, Clear Mint (this kind does not contain stannous flouride), I became very spacey (mentally) and my short-term memory problems increased (this lasted until early afternoon on the day of the morning I first tried it). I didn't use it for about a week after that, then started using it again only at night before bed and in a smaller amount (like every other night). It still seemed to cause the mental symptoms for from about 4 days to a week or so (and during this time I did not use it every single day). After that, I started using it every day, then in the morning and at night, and I did not notice any of the mental symptoms any more.

Last edited on Sun May 20th, 2012 17:17 by findinganswers



____________________
Diabetes type I hypothyroid IBS ADD GAD 125D37 25D12 Ph1Sept07 Ph2Jun08 ModPh2Nov08 25D8.5(June08) 25D<4(April2010) 25D5.5(Oct2010) 25D4(Jan2011) 25D7.4(Oct2011) 25D4(Feb2012) Levoxyl Lantus Humalog Cal/Mag Supp. qod Julbo Dolgan sunglasses light exp

 Current time is 10:23
Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  



* We can help you understand chronic disease, but only your physician is licensed to give you medical care *

Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Entire site Copyright © 2004-2018 Autoimmunity Research Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Click here to view our PRIVACY POLICY
Page processed in 0.1007 seconds (41% database + 59% PHP). 18 queries executed.