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The Marshall Protocol Study Site > PROF. MARSHALL'S PERSPECTIVE > Prof. Marshall's Perspective > Cathelicidin is Badly Deficient in Seriously ill Sarcoidosis Patients


Cathelicidin is Badly Deficient in Seriously ill Sarcoidosis Patients
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3   
 

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wrotek
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 Posted: Fri Aug 17th, 2012 03:14

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It would be nice to know where does the personalized sensitivity to particular foods come from. Why one organism reacts this way to certain food and other organism does not.


I am not lactose intolerant for example, i could be drinking milk without problem.

Last edited on Fri Aug 17th, 2012 03:24 by wrotek



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LR
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 Posted: Fri Aug 17th, 2012 13:03

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Even if you are not allergic to milk or sensitive to lactose, it is nonetheless inflammatory.

However, I think your real question is how do people become sensitive to foods. The medical research on this is extensive. You could probably check out Dr. William Rae's textbooks on Chemical Sensitivity in 4 volumes, which I believe covers food sensitivities. Dr. Rae is probably the most prominent physician alive working on sensitivities from his clinic in Dallas.

One conventional answer is that when people do not digest their foods properly (whether due to junk food, celiac disease, or other causes), the particles do not break down sufficiently and pass through into the bloodstream in units which trigger the antibodies to treat them as invaders. I do not believe this is a complete answer. It might be true for some cases though. Other theories include environmental toxins altering hormonal and other systems, breaking down their integrity. There are others. I have been meaning to read Dr. Rae's texts for many years now, in which case I might be able to give a better answer! Just have not had time! : )

With respect to treatment of sensitivities, the main approach, (aside from curing the underlying problems with the innate immune system via the MP) is to calm the antibodies storm down by reducing the total load. This calls for eliminating as much stress on your systems as possible, by eliminating to the extent possible chemicals in your air food and water, avoiding any airborn, touch, or edible triggers of these antibodies (whether IgE IgG, IgM or other) to the extent possible, getting rid of bacterial, fungal or viral infections to the extent possible .

IT does work. Once your antibody storms have subsided you can reintroduce problematic foods slowly and carefully. I was what is popularly called a "universal reactor" with respect to food sensitivities 30 years ago (ie there were no foods left that I had eaten before that I could tolerate). I could only eat one food a day and not repeat it for 5 days, and it had to be something I had not eaten before I got sick. However within about 3 years after starting to address it correctly -- through dedicated avoidance, detoxification and a host of other approaches, I was able to start reintroducing foods, and now can eat basically anything. Not that I eat junk now or I would probably go downhill rapidly, but any healthy food. Also chemicals do not have drastic effects on my mental and physical capacities anymore either. Same with pollens. No asthma for the past 25 years, although the rest of my family, whose allergies were much less debilitating -- just hayfever, asthma and a few food sensitivties-- all use puffers for asthma and pills for hayfever and continue with major problems with allergies.



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MP:Jun7 08; Ph3-Aug09; Olmetec only- Feb11; DXs:Envir.sens; chronic fatigue, celiac, kidney failure, osteoporosis, calcified low thyroid,uterine fibroids, extreme low magnesium/B-12 etc. Jan07 D= 20.8 1,25D=75; May 2007 D=15.6; 1,25 D=52.9;Jun2011 D=5.6 1
Cynthia S
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 Posted: Fri Aug 17th, 2012 13:27

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LR wrote: Basically inflammatory foods are meat, ...

Current diets in developed countries are based on refined wheat, vast quantities of meat, ...

Most traditions over millenium have emphasized an anti-inflammatory diet for chronic illness, ...


I have to take strong exception to these statements, tho I won't argue about any inflammatory effects of meat.  You are setting up for putting meat on your 'BAD' list.  This is nonsense.  Prior to the agricultural revolution, meat was the preferred food, even to the extent that the Inuits eat nothing but meat and fat for most of the year and often all of the year.  They had excellent health until the introduction of civilized food, containing loads of carbohydrates,  Same with the Maasai.  You ask anyone that is an expert on pre-agricultural populations, and they will tell you that most of our diseases we call modern diseases did not exist in pre-agricultural populations.

I am personally now committed to a very low carbohydrate life style because I consider it the healthiest way to live, and I am aghast at the enormous amounts of carbohydrates offered in main course foods sold at the grocery stores, with so little added meat where even in these dishes there should be some meat.  Go to restaurants, and try to sift thru the menu for a high meat dish.  Sure, steaks are offered, and steak houses exist, but these are not the common fair for most people, but the treat.  You and those you read may think that people are eating loads of meat, but that is not what I see.

Cynthia



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mvanwink5
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 Posted: Fri Aug 17th, 2012 14:34

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Pro and con meat dietary theories, it seems they are never ending. Why is that? Sounds like more pseudo science to me.

Best regards,
Mike



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scooker48
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 Posted: Fri Aug 17th, 2012 15:27

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And is dark chocolate also guilty of causing high acidity?

I fear it is...

Sherry



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leroybrown
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 Posted: Sat Aug 18th, 2012 05:13

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Say it ain't so!



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And I don't know when - Kate Bush
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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sat Aug 18th, 2012 09:00

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I personally prefer Cadbury's Dairy Milk (a white chocolate). Unfortunately the stuff made by Hershey's in the US is not as good as the real stuff I buy when I am travelling in Europe or Australia, but, oh well...
 
Dove milk chocolate isn't too bad, either. And it is really cheap to buy in China...
 
Didn't eat any chocolate when I went to Russia last month. No idea what they have there, yet. Maybe next time...
 

LR
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 Posted: Sat Aug 18th, 2012 13:20

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Hi,

I am not sure that pure unsweetened dark chocolate is acidic as it is not in the tables I have. But as soon as you add any sugar, it goes into the fairly strongly acidic category. The reason I am not sure about dark chocolate itself is that it is a bean and generally beans are alkalizing.

What I do sometimes is use unsweetened dark chocolate and add stevia to whatever I am making --whether hot cocoa or something else with chocolate. Stevia can be obtained either as a green herb or as an extracted white powder. It has been used for thousands of years in South America safely, and used in Japan for decades. Research indicates that it is actually beneficial for diabetics (and not just because it means that they can avoid sugar) -- but the beneficial effect is very mild and not a cure unfortunately. If you do try Stevia, try to get a brand that has no bitter after-taste. There are brands like that now. The older extracts used to be good only to a certain point, and then you had to add a drop of honey or maple syrup to get the sweetness all the way up without getting any bitter taste. That still allowed you to eliminate 9/10s of the sugar.

Another way to use unsweetened chocolate is in a mole sauce without sugar. Didn't think I'd like chocolate without sweetener, but I made a spicy mole sauce and it was great.

Last edited on Sat Aug 18th, 2012 13:26 by LR



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MP:Jun7 08; Ph3-Aug09; Olmetec only- Feb11; DXs:Envir.sens; chronic fatigue, celiac, kidney failure, osteoporosis, calcified low thyroid,uterine fibroids, extreme low magnesium/B-12 etc. Jan07 D= 20.8 1,25D=75; May 2007 D=15.6; 1,25 D=52.9;Jun2011 D=5.6 1
leroybrown
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 Posted: Sat Aug 18th, 2012 14:46

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You know what? I actually grew stevia in a pot in the backyard one summer. The leaves tasted sweet. It grew easily.

Deb



____________________
I just know that something good is going to happen
And I don't know when - Kate Bush
Aplastic anemia Apr/10, PRCA Jan/09, Agranulocytosis 1991
25D = 25 1,25D = 58 Aug 18/09|25D<4.8 Mar/10|10.8 Nov/12
Sep '09 q8h Nov '09 q6h
LR
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 Posted: Sun Aug 19th, 2012 17:14

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Yes, me too. I dried the leaves and I use them in tea and other things too.

It grows easily and rapidly in summer, but is not a perennial in Canada. As a South American plant, I guess it needs more heat than we get in our winters!

I guess you can try bringing it inside in a pot in fall, but I am not sure it would survive low light conditions in houses, so did not bother to try. I stick with perennials for the most part, as I don't want to go to the expense of buying annuals that are only going to last one season.

But it was nice to have the fresh leaves and also to have some to dry.

Last edited on Sun Aug 19th, 2012 17:16 by LR



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MP:Jun7 08; Ph3-Aug09; Olmetec only- Feb11; DXs:Envir.sens; chronic fatigue, celiac, kidney failure, osteoporosis, calcified low thyroid,uterine fibroids, extreme low magnesium/B-12 etc. Jan07 D= 20.8 1,25D=75; May 2007 D=15.6; 1,25 D=52.9;Jun2011 D=5.6 1

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