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The Obesity Era
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3   
 

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wrotek
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 Posted: Sun Feb 9th, 2014 05:48

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Dr Trevor Marshall wrote:
No, they don't consider that because their physician-mentors have told them that the body is sterile. If there were any pathogens present, they would obviously have been wiped out by antibiotics :)


They really think that ? I think quite long time ago i heard that human body carries like 1-2 Kilograms of microbiota... 1-3% of body mass.

Last edited on Sun Feb 9th, 2014 05:49 by wrotek



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sun Feb 9th, 2014 07:18

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Ah - but those are friendly microbes :) or so the story goes....

Cynthia S
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 Posted: Sun Feb 9th, 2014 08:22

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And they are all in the intestines, or other parts of the body with access to the outside world.

I wonder how much that estimate of weight or % mas would go up if they included all the microbes.  But I guess the fact that the bacteria drop their cell walls, and are on the order of the size of viruses, and viruses are so small they probably don't add much weight, it might not be so impressive.  But those in biofilms might add some.

Cynthia



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leroybrown
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 Posted: Fri May 23rd, 2014 07:10

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Anyone see this?

http://about.abc.net.au/press-releases/statement-from-abc-managing-director-on-catalyst-ruling/

12th May 2014
Statement from ABC Managing Director on Catalyst ruling Today, the ABC’s independent Audience and Consumer Affairs Unit has released its findings regarding a controversial Catalyst program on statins and heart disease.

The detailed investigation was prompted by a number of complaints  into two Catalyst programs, collectively titled Heart Of The Matter, aired in October last year. The report of the investigation is available here.

While acknowledging the importance of public health issues relating to the efficacy of heart disease treatment and the contrasting opinions of highly-qualified scientists, the A&CA has concluded that the second episode breaches ABC standards on impartiality.

Because of the interlocked nature of the two programs, both will be removed from the ABC website.  Information will be added to the program website and the ABC Corrections page to advise of the steps that have been taken.

Additionally, the PM program has added an Editor’s Note to the transcript of its story ‘Backlash against ABC’s Catalyst program questioning heart disease-cholesterol links’, and an appropriate entry has been made on the ABC Corrections page. The note on the Catalyst website will also reinforce the advice made in the second Catalyst program, that viewers should not make any changes to their prescribed regimen of medications without seeking appropriate medical advice.

As the A&CA report shows, this has been a thorough investigation involving complex issues and a wide range of material.

The Catalyst programs were very engaging, attracted large audiences and clearly touched on an issue of importance to many Australians. The link between statins and heart disease is a matter warranting investigation and coverage on our programs. The issue has been extensively covered overseas and continues to be the subject of debate within medical circles. I would like to see our science programs on radio and TV work together to revisit it, whilst taking absolute care to comply with our rigorous editorial policies.

- Mark Scott For more information Media contact:
Nick Leys  03 9626 1417
leys.nick@abc.net.au



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Rico
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 Posted: Sun Dec 21st, 2014 09:09

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In Europe, obesity is considered a disability ...

http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/12/19/in-europe-obesity-is-a-disability-court-ruling-forces-companies-to-offer-overweight-staff-lighter-work-loads/



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 Posted: Thu Nov 19th, 2015 18:41

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How depleting the gut microbiota protects from obesity

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151116120605.htm

The scientists observed that depleting microbiota -- either through antibiotics or in germ-free mice -- stimulated the development of functional beige fat within the white fat, in the same way as when exposed to cold or exercise. But how does this work? It all has to do with a specific cell type, called macrophages. Macrophages are an essential component of the immune system and fulfil various metabolic functions, including tissue remodelling. They express different functional programmes in response to micro-environmental signals, a process called "polarization." Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: M1 and M2, the latter being able to act on the adipose and increase the production of beige fat. When the microbiota is depleted, the number of specific cells, called eosinophils, increases in white fat, which secretes small signalling proteins ("type 2 cytokines") that act on macrophages polarization. Thanks to these proteins, M1 macrophages turn into M2 macrophages, which activate the browning of white fat and reduce obesity.

Bane
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 Posted: Thu Nov 19th, 2015 19:36

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Bane wrote:
How depleting the gut microbiota protects from obesity

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151116120605.htm

The scientists observed that depleting microbiota -- either through antibiotics or in germ-free mice -- stimulated the development of functional beige fat within the white fat, in the same way as when exposed to cold or exercise. But how does this work? It all has to do with a specific cell type, called macrophages. Macrophages are an essential component of the immune system and fulfil various metabolic functions, including tissue remodelling. They express different functional programmes in response to micro-environmental signals, a process called "polarization." Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: M1 and M2, the latter being able to act on the adipose and increase the production of beige fat. When the microbiota is depleted, the number of specific cells, called eosinophils, increases in white fat, which secretes small signalling proteins ("type 2 cytokines") that act on macrophages polarization. Thanks to these proteins, M1 macrophages turn into M2 macrophages, which activate the browning of white fat and reduce obesity.


HOW MICROBES DEFINE, SHAPE — AND MIGHT EVEN HEAL US

http://ideas.ted.com/how-microbes-define-shape-and-might-even-heal-us/

"Until a trip to Peru in 2008, I used to weigh quite a bit more. My wife Amanda and I hiked the Inca Trail and then spent a week in the Amazon, where we both came down with really nasty diarrhea — not what you want when you’re in a tent. We recovered, only to both have it flare up again. To treat it, we both took doses of the same antibiotic. When we got home, we resumed more or less the same diets and exercise patterns we’d had before we left for the trip. However, I lost about eighty pounds in a few months, going from obese to a healthy body weight.

The difference was remarkable. I had to buy new pants, and colleagues took me aside to ask if I had cancer or if there was something else they should know about. In contrast, Amanda lost no weight at all. I believe that the difference was related to a radical change in my microbes: we each responded differently to the same disease and the same course of treatment"

Bane
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 Posted: Thu Nov 19th, 2015 21:08

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Rob Knight: How our microbes make us who we are

https://www.ted.com/talks/rob_knight_how_our_microbes_make_us_who_we_are



Our Microbiome - Health Matters

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfh6j_HF8NQ


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