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A visit with Dr Alan Cantwell
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  
 

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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 02:34

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Yesterday, Liz and I spent the evening with Dr Alan Cantwell, chatting, and bringing each other up-to-date with conference coordination.

Alan showed me a slide of 'the cancer microbe' in heart muscle of a 41yo female Lupus patient who had died following a Heart Attack. He was preparing the slide for his presentation at our conference.

This slide was from his 1984 paper "Variably acid-fast bacteria in a necropsied case of systemic lupus erythematosus with acute myocardial infarction."
http://tinyurl.com/gouxs
a paper that I had not really noticed before,in an obscure hard-copy journal.

I thought everybody would be interested in that slide. I told Alan that just about everyone experiences "heart flutters" at some point or other during the MP, and it is comforting to be able to visualize the bugs which live in cardiac muscle.

But then Alan gave me a preprint of the actual paper, where there are also photos of the microbes in this patient's Kidney, in her Brain, and her Adrenal Gland. Never say that Th1 is not a systemic disease:)

Alan also showed me some old, out-of-print books (in Spanish) showing electron micrographs of a whole range of bacteria, with pictures of both the L-form and rod-form shapes. Amazing stuff. The conference is going to be an eye-opener, especially for the physicians (who tend to dwell on wanting to see photographs and species and 'proof.')

We chewed around the overall 'big picture' with Alan opining that he felt the key species which he thought might 'inter-breed,' and thus lead to chronic Th1 inflammation, might well be Staph, Mycobacteria and Propionibacterium acnes and I noted that all of these had been identified as associated with sarcoidosis. I also mentioned that Borrelia and Rickettsia seem to be endemic at the moment

I was intrigued when he saw a copy of Dr Andy Wright's video which shows the "string of pearls," and immediately identified it as Strep, showing me a very similar photograph in one of his old, long-lost text books. Alan had also frequently seen the long transparent tubules which show up in Andy's microscopy, and I am sure he and John McDonald are going to have some long discussions about microscope technology over the coming months:)

Anyway, it was fascinating to sit down with Alan again, and go over details which we hadn't covered in the past. What an amazing person, with an amazing array of experience, and a mind still razor-sharp.

He will be at the conference Friday evening, Saturday and Sunday, so there will be plenty of opportunity for us all to sit around (in small groups) and chat with him about the details of what we see during his presentations.

Last edited on Sun May 21st, 2006 06:17 by Prof Trevor Marshall

Frans
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 04:46

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Dr Trevor Marshall wrote: I was intrigued when he saw a copy of Dr Andy Wright's video which shows the "string of pearls," and immediately identified it as Strep, showing me a very similar photograph in one of his old, long-lost text books. Alan had also frequently seen the long transparent tubules which show up in Andy's microscopy, and I am sure he and John McDonald are going to have some long discussions about microscope technology over the coming months:)

It would be interesting to bring dr Cantwell in contact with dr Wright I guess?

It would be nice if the DNA-work dr Wright hopes to get from his slides, as he stated on the video, confrims dr Cantwell's findings? That would be mutually beneficial I guess? It would be great if someone starts quoting dr Cantwell's work, since I understand from his book "Four women against cancer" that the way they have suppressed his findings was to not quote them at any time.

Sincerely, Frans

 



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Nikki
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 10:34

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I understand from his book "Four women against cancer" that the way they have suppressed his findings was to not quote them at any time.


I'd be interested to know how many of the 997 Sarcoidosis PubMed-indexed publications since Dr Marshall's incredible findings have made reference to it....any idea? I wouldn't be surprised if this important work which can save so many people is ignored as Dr Cantwell's work was...

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 10:35 by Nikki



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 10:55

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Eurico,
"Google Scholar" is a poor man's citation index, and I note that a search for our Autoimmunity Reviews paper
http://tinyurl.com/nysth

shows 3 external citations
http://tinyurl.com/l7mvh

Interesting that one of our BMJ letters was cited here
http://tinyurl.com/outxf
I had thought they had all slipped into oblivion:)

I do know that there was a Japanese paper which cited Autoimmunity Reviews, Belinda found that one listed in Science Citation Index. It doesn't seem to be in Google Scholar.

But as you say, all in all, it seems that folks are determined to ignore what we have done. However, as in Alan's case, 99.9% of the world is still unable to comprehend the science, and this makes it tough for them to understand its relevance.

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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 11:22

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If intracellular bacteria are involved in both Th1 disease and cancer, what makes them different? Is it the species of bacteria or is it more complex than this? I hope DVDs are made of the upcoming conference...



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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 11:24

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Trevor,

Thanks for sharing.  :cool:

It sounds like you've found another brilliant mind to add to our MP database of knowledge.  I can't wait to meet Dr Cantwell.  He sounds like a real asset for all of us.

In addition to Eurico's question above, why do you suppose some of us get sicker sooner while others seem to go on and on with minimal symptoms into old age? 

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 11:26 by Reenie

Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 12:03

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Eurico,
Implicit in your question is the concept that Cancer is somehow "different."

In many ways Cancer results from the inability of the immune system to deal with the mutant cells when they start to form, thus allowing them to proliferate. Which, IMO, is not all that different from the immune system, weakened by Th1 infection, being unable to clear the body of a co-infection, such as babesia or EBV.

Reenie, the course of the disease is mediated by a number of factors. Some bacterial mutants overcome the immune system more completely than others. Some infectious-histories weaken the immune system more effectively.

Additionally, I personally think that unless the brain is involved in the infection, folks seem to get by more easily. It is the mind-fog, psychoses, sleep disturbance and fatigue which tend to be lifestyle-limiting at a point before our physical bodies give out.

We can see an example of infectious-history becoming overwhelming when we look at HIV infection. The HIV virus overwhelms innate immunity, causing almost total shutdown of 1,25-D production (and thus disabling VDR -- or vice versa). Underlying (occult) infection can then take over, and drive the body towards clinical AIDS. Not everybody with HIV goes on to the stage of clinical AIDS. And as the HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) gets rid of the AIDS virus, patients are left to recover to Sarcoidosis, Tuberculosis, Cancers and less severe Th1-related disease. A number of studies have shown that "Quality of Life" is not restored by HAART. There are other factors in play. And this is what Alan and I will be exploring at the upcoming conference. The importance of sequential past infections, of what I call 'infectious-history'.

LeAnne
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 12:13

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While this is very fascinating, it is also scary. I have had those "heart flutters". Not only that, six years ago, my father died of colon cancer. Maybe killing the bacteria will lessen any chance of me developing cancer. I'm looking forward to this discussion.

LeAnne

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 12:13 by LeAnne



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Bella
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 13:03

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Amazing stuff. I see so much in the nursing world that smells of TH1 illness...that I wish I could just shout the MP from the mountain tops...(I do when I can):)... It saddens me to see all that I do and only palliative measures taken...breaks my heart....I can't wait for the day that the medical community wakes up and smells the coffee. The science makes perfect sense!

You all have fun at the conference. I cant wait to see the DVDs!!

Jeannine

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 13:05 by Bella



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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 14:23

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Ah, if they aren't that different then, might the MP not work for cancer?



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 14:40

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Eurico, I have no idea. Nor do I have any idea how one could test that hypothesis

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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 15:30

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A case of renal sarcoidosis with complement activation via the lectin pathway



There might be others,but this is the only paper I found in Science Citation Index which lists Marshall, T G, 2004 in its bibliography.

Dr. Marshall, I note you are a prolific writer. Time is on our side.

Sherry



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Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 15:38

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Sherry,
Yes, that was the one Belinda had found

But I am really not a prolific writer. Some academics write an average of one article every 2 weeks. I figure that there is a better balance achievable in the use of my time:):)

Thanks for your help:

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 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 12:54

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jeanninehope wrote:
Amazing stuff. I see so much in the nursing world that smells of TH1 illness...that I wish I could just shout the MP from the mountain tops...(I do when I can):)... It saddens me to see all that I do and only palliative measures taken...breaks my heart....I can't wait for the day that the medical community wakes up and smells the coffee. The science makes perfect sense!

Jeannine

What saddens me is offering the MP to my patients and being declined. They are not interested in changing their lifestyles to get well. Perhaps I am not explaining it well enough...:(

SteveF



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 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:20

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I have the same question. .. would the MP work for someone who already has cancer? Specifically, if someone has lung cancer? This particular person that I am talking about is taking Chemotherapy and has been diagnosed with Lung Cancer since last November or December....She is the minister's wife....

I do not think that she would consider the MP, but I am wondering if it would work for someone who has already been diagnosed with Cancer and has been taking Chemo and Radiation... ?

 



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 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:22

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Perhaps I am not explaining it well enough...

Steve,

Maybe you're explaining it "all too well."  I mean, when my family sees how I'm going along, I would think they would jump at the chance to be a part of the MP community too, but, I think they are just too afraid to change or trust anything but conventional medicine although it's failing them miserably.  So sad... :(

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 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:29

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Does anyone here know anything about Marfan Syndrome? Would that also be caused by Th1 Inflammation? According to what I have read, Marfan Syndrome is inherited,, and you are born with it.

 If anyone has any information, please tell me.. Thanks.



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Mary..Sarcoidosis. 1,25D=56..25D=6..Began Benicar 20mg q3hrs..9/4/05. Granulomas in arms, hips,legs. Painful lymph nodes hips, armpits. Pain in chest,back,head. Avoiding sun/bright lights/Vit D. Using NoIRs
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 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:42

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Hi Madwolf,

I am glad you are offering the MP to your patients!:dude: You can lead a horse to water but you can NOT make him drink!!!!! At least, you have the knowledge to make the offer. I hope we can get more health professionals to do this. I think the word of the MP will spread as people get well and the end result is seen more and more....

I hope soon we can have some data to be able to put in front of those non-believer or nah sayers! We just love numbers LOL:shock:

Keep the great work up!

Maybe you could share in general how your patients or yourself are doing on the MP to encourage others?!?

Jeannine Jalanivich RN

Last edited on Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:44 by Bella



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 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:48

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MadWolf: "...changing their lifestyles to get well..."
I am still working that angle even though I am on the MP. It is hard to change my lifestyle for a period of time. Maybe some people are better at knowing their boundaries at the outset and that they will never change. Mine seem so flexible by comparison.

My husband jokes we are doing "Halloween" all year round. Our parents don't come to visit so often now, as the dark house is a bit upsetting to them. It is a challenge for those that live here too (even the cats display their disgust by opening blinds and crawling behind curtains so they can watch kitty TV during the day hours).

I was even thinking maybe of wearing a wet-suit of thick rubber from head to toe, then throw a wig on it and sunglasses around the house. That might help family feel like they don't have to do cave life too, but given what I can see in their symptom set, lack of light is probably is a good thing for them right now too.

Oh well & getting well, I guess.--JRF 

Last edited on Tue Apr 25th, 2006 15:09 by jrfoutin



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 Posted: Wed Apr 26th, 2006 04:11

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Memoking wrote: I have the same question. .. would the MP work for someone who already has cancer?
I don't think it is wise for dr Marshall to answer this at this point in time, but we could try google to find if someone, somewhere, is having positive experiences/results in treating cancer with antibiotics.

Sincerely, Frans

Last edited on Wed Apr 26th, 2006 04:12 by Frans



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