The Marshall Protocol Study Site Home

Search
   
Members

Calendar

Help

Home
Search by username
   Not logged in - Login | Register 


Vitamin D is a steroid
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall
 

New Topic

Reply

Print
AuthorPost
shamutooth
Member
 

Joined: Fri Sep 24th, 2004
Location: Ohio USA
Posts: 269
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Oct 29th, 2006 06:23

Quote

Reply
So what has happened to this theory these past decades?Thank goodness for Trevor's research:)

"Then in 1932, the elucidation of vitamin D's chemical structure revealed that this vitamin was in fact a steroid."



____________________
MCS,CFS,IBS,insomnia,anxiety,depression,started Doxy July'04, MP Sept. 04; Benicar 40mg 3/day; Phase 2 started 2/2/05; 6/28/05 D results 25D=29,125D=47;11/13/05 25D=10

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Oct 29th, 2006 06:42

Quote

Reply
As I understand it, the final decision if vit. D is actually a steroid, has only been reached not so long ago. I remember Trevor stating that somewhere.

BTW  here is a tinyurl link to the article you mention:

- http://tinyurl.com/yfbkzv

Sincerely, Frans



____________________
Burn-out/nervous breakdown Jan01 125D 48 25D8.48 Ph1Nov06 ModPh2Jan07 Ph2Apr08 Cipramil Seroquel NoIRs lite exp r/t work cover up 25D3.9(Oct07)
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15799
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Oct 30th, 2006 05:53

Quote

Reply
I have spoken with Tony Norman several times, and he has read Karolinska, and the other main papers I have sent him.

Nevertheless, Tony remains fixated on the VDR and DBP, probably because he lacks the clinical data showing widespread systemic effects, and therefore he has not considered that other receptors may be activated by the Vitamins D. In particular, he has no concept that the Glucocorticoid receptor and the Thyroid receptors might form part of this "rapid response" fixation of his research, or, more likely, that some yet-to-be-identified GPCRs are involved.

Looking for the answers in PubMed is a pretty futile exercise, unfortunately. For me to investigate a new receptor or ligand combination requires a walk down the hallway to the computer holding my molecular data, and a few hours of CPU time. For conventional researchers it involves writing grant proposals, endless meetings, persuading a post-Doc to do the actual work, and about 3 years of study...

It is nice that he is really starting to push the "steroid" nomenclature, however. Thanks for the link...


 Current time is 21:24



* We can help you understand chronic disease, but only your physician is licensed to give you medical care *

Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Entire site Copyright © 2004-2020 Autoimmunity Research Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Click here to view our PRIVACY POLICY
Page processed in 0.0446 seconds (83% database + 17% PHP). 17 queries executed.