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Amy Proal's "Bacteriality.com"
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Ames
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 Posted: Sun Mar 2nd, 2008 18:21

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Thanks very much Gus - but I'd like to make clear that my website can't substitute for this site.  I've tried to take a different angle on the science, approching it from a journalistic perspective, which is something the moderators simply can't do on a study site.  But there is a ton of valuable info on this site not mentioned on Bacteriality and I always insist that anyone interested in the MP read this site as well as my blog.

Today I'm writing to let you know there is a new interview up on Bacteriality.  I interviewed Jane Taylor - a woman who started the MP in the early days and not surpringly is doing very well.  I was also very happy to learn that Jane has before/after pictures of some of her symptoms as well as a graph of her ACE level.  Also note how many of her blood tests have come back into range thanks to the MP.  Very encouraging!

Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/02/interview17/

PS Jane wrote the interview, I helped her edit it......



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CFS/FMS/osteopenia/severe insomnia Non -MP meds: Gabitril (16 mg),Trazodone (150 mg),Tramadol (20 mg) for pain. Light: Noirs (outside and bright lights), thick layers, sunscreen
Ames
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 Posted: Mon Mar 10th, 2008 14:22

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Hi! As usual I'm annoucing a new article.  As you may have read in another thread I will be  giving a poster presentation at the upcoming Days of Molecular Medicine Conference in Karolinska Sweden.  The following article describes what I will be presenting at the conference.

"Cognitive dysfunction in women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: examining the role of the endometrium, the nuclear receptors, and antimicrobial peptides"

Here's the article:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/09/cognitive-dysfunction/

I'm really excited to go to the conference and present this information in person!

Amy



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eClaire
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 Posted: Thu Mar 13th, 2008 01:21

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Amy,

If I could comprehend your article:shock:, I'm sure I'd be saying, "It was great!"

Looking forward to reading it in a couple of years when I get my brain back!;)

Claire



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Caitiegirl
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 Posted: Thu Mar 13th, 2008 16:22

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Congratulations Amy on an excellent paper. Good Luck with it in Karolinska!

My daughter and I were just talking about how useless CBT* is. She has had OCD symptoms off and on since she was 10. Medicines have not helped and neither did any attempt at behavioral therapy. But oh Clindamyocin! Does it ever hit the OCD symptoms. We can see so much of ourselves in your case histories. I was a microbiologist but now I can't remember my zip code or my name on a bad day. I recently wrote the wrong name on my name tag at a dinner. I refuse to believe this is about the normal aging process, especially when I see my 17 year old struggling with the same issues at an earlier age. I hope you and the team can successfully draw attention to the real disease pathology at work so all of us mothers can stop joking about having to "donate" our brain cells with each pregnancy.
Regards,
Mindy

* [Moderator's Note: CBT =  Cognitive Behavior Therapy.]



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laura1814
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 Posted: Sat Mar 15th, 2008 00:56

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Wow, what an amazing paper. I think I understood perhaps a third of it, no reflection on your writing skills but rather my own level of brain fog.

But it seems that I am somewhat fortunate in the level of brain fog I have suffered. While it has been bad, and I have covered up a lot of it over the years, it never approached the level of the women you highlight in this article. Indeed, I was actually able to take and pass (barely) the Texas Bar Exam while I was sick in 2000. My cognitive dysfunction is palpable as immunopathology as I progress on the MP.

As an aside, would it be possible for someone to change the title of this thread to reflect that it is about many of your articles, not just one?

Good luck at Karolinska!



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CFS, EBV, hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, MP 1/08; NoIRs, low lux home, ltd. outings, covered up; 25D=5ng/mL. Benicar q4h. XL doses of Z+Q 4/18/20; Iv weekly 4/25/20; break 5/20/20; resumed ZP at low dose 6/29/20; resumed Iv 8/14/20 at 1/3 dose.
Ames
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 Posted: Sat Mar 15th, 2008 10:19

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Hi Clare, Caitiegirl, and Laura,

I'm glad to hear that you seem to have gotten the "gist" of the paper, if not all the exact mechanisms I discussed.  This is definitely the most complicated piece I have put up on Bacteriality- usually the pieces are easier to understand.  I made an exception and put this last piece up even though it was somewhat complicated because I want my readers to know what I will be presenting at Karolinska.  Describing the issues in conversational format also helped me get my thoughts together so that hopefully I can better adressess the questions and challenges that will pop up at the conference itself. 

I too found CBT to be a total waste of money.  I remember being on a huge waiting list to see a prestigious CBT doctor and then feeling exactly the same after many appointments. 

I used to think that perhaps I could "think my way out" of symptoms, but the MP has quelled that idea.  Now that I realize the complexity of the dysregulation that occurs in chronic inflammatory disease, I understand how naive it is to think that we can change our biology by changing our thinking. 

Amy

Last edited on Sat Mar 15th, 2008 10:20 by Ames



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Ames
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 Posted: Sat Mar 15th, 2008 16:51

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Hello again!  This time I'm writing to tell let you know that I just put up a new patient interview on the site.  This one is unique because it is the first time I have asked someone to report on progress at the end of phase 1. 

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/15/interview18/

I spoke with Doreen V, mother of Brendon, an 18-year-old who is using the MP to treat mild autism, other behavioral disorders, and CFS.  Although the interview focuses on Brendon's experience with phase 1, his entire family, including Doreen are also on the MP. 

They are recoving as a family and I think this interview proves that it can be done - an entire family can use the MP to get their health back and all move towards better health at the same time.

During phase 1 Brendon experienced periods of social activity that indicate his autism indeed seems to be responding to the MP.  Exciting!

Amy




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CFS/FMS/osteopenia/severe insomnia Non -MP meds: Gabitril (16 mg),Trazodone (150 mg),Tramadol (20 mg) for pain. Light: Noirs (outside and bright lights), thick layers, sunscreen
k
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 Posted: Sun Mar 23rd, 2008 03:01

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I just wanted to say that about 10 years ago I had some CBT therapy for anxiety and also depression.  It was a HUGE help to me.  Liberating and empowering.  So there are some people who benefit.

I cannot see however, how it would make one iota of difference to CFS/ME which I now have.  I was totally shocked that to discover that it is an advocated treatment for CFS/ME.  I can see how it may be beneficial in helping you to adjust to life with a chronic and debilitating illness.  But I absolutely cannot see how it could possibly ever make any difference to the underlying condition.  Madness.

k



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Ames
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 Posted: Sun Mar 23rd, 2008 09:10

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I put a new piece up on Bacteriality today.  I talk about two articles I read recently on vitamin D on two different science blogs.  One of the blog entries was written by Dr. Len Lichenfeld, head of the American Cancer Society, who has a very reasonable view about vitamin D.  It's a breath of fresh air to here him discuss the fact that more studies must be done on vitamin D before people decide to supplement with more of the substance, and also that the current view on viatmin D is squewed because some proponents of vitamin D are acting more like zealots then scientists. 

I also discuss a post by Steven Strauss on the CBC blog where he points out many of finanacial conflicts of interest that influence the vitamin D debate.   Here you go:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/22/vitamind2/

K,

Thanks for sharing your experience with CBT.  I guess, as you say, it can have a positive effect for some people.  However, in my article I was focusing on what you also mentioned - that the only way to actually target the underlying cause of the diseases today is the MP. 

Last edited on Sun Mar 23rd, 2008 09:24 by Ames



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Ames
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 Posted: Mon Mar 31st, 2008 20:49

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Hello!

I put a new interview up on the site today.  It's with Ken L.  He doesn't post on the board, but the MP has done wonders in allowing him to recover from Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome.  As you will see in the interview, he also suffered from many symptoms associated with MS.  Although he was never officially diagnosed with the disease, in my opinion he probably could have been.  Just goes to show how greatly the Th1 diseaes overlap.....

Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/31/interview19/

Best,

Amy



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Ames
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 Posted: Mon Apr 7th, 2008 10:27

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Good morning!

I put a new piece up on Bacteriality last night. 

I'm fascinated by the phenomenon of horizontal gene transfer, as I don't think it's possible for any of us to truly envision what our bacterial loads are like without taking into account the reality that bacteria and other pathogens are trading DNA all the time.

So I called up two of the top researchers in the field of horzontal gene transfer - Dr. Peter Gogarten at the University of Connecticut, and Dr. James Lake at UCLA.  They were friendly and eager to speak with me. 

So my latest article on Bacteriality is a write-up of what we discussed.  Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/06/genetransfer/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Mon Apr 7th, 2008 12:17 by Ames



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jcwat101
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 Posted: Mon Apr 7th, 2008 20:56

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Great interviews, on horizontal gene transfer, Amy.

I think everyone should read it.

Joyce Waterhouse



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Ames
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 Posted: Sun Apr 13th, 2008 21:05

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Thank you very much Joyce!

I just put up another interview on Bacteriality today.  While doing research for an article on biofilm bacteria (that I still plan to write) I stumbled across the story of Dr. Randall Wolcott - a physician in Texas who is fighting an essentially one man battle to prove to the mainstream medical community that diabetic wounds result largely from infection with biofilm bacteria.  He has also developed techniques that allow him to slowly kill the biofilms on his patients' wounds - saving his patients from the horrors of amputation.

Of course, the treatments Dr. Wolcott is using to treat biofilms are external therapies and do not work to kill biofilms within the body.  So his treatments will not target the biofilm bacteria that we have implicated (along with L-form bacteria) in causing the inflammatory diseases treated by the MP.  Also, while Dr. Wolcott is able to save his patients from amputation, unless his patients were to do the Marshall Protocol, they still have diabetes and may suffer from future wounds.

Yet, there are many parallels between his work and the MP.  First, he's trying to emphasize the importance of bacteria in an area in which they are being ignored.  He's also facing a medical community that is slow to accept his work because they are fixated on Koch's postulates and outdated culturing techniques.

I think his story is inspiring and reveals yet another person working relentlessly to show that bacteria, rather than genes or environmental factors, should be the focus of current research, and that medicine can only continue to advance if we start to treat the myraid bacteria at the heart of every inflammatory disease.

Here's the interview:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/13/wolcott/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Sun Apr 13th, 2008 23:12 by



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Martha
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 Posted: Sun Apr 13th, 2008 23:35

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Really interesting stuff Amy! I had heard that a xylitol nasal wash was a really effective cure for chronic sinusitis. My sister suffers from type I diabetes and on 2 pumps so I will keep this info for her for future reference for diabetic wound healing. She would never consider MP until she sees me getting better.

Thank you for your great interviews, Martha

Prof Trevor Marshall
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 Posted: Mon Apr 14th, 2008 00:12

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'Diabetic foot' made a big impact on me when I first saw it back in the 1978 timeframe during my early clinical research in Western Australia. Especially the comment from a new Intern from Pakistan who said that where he had been trained, it was called "leper's foot."

That thought caught my attention, and you will find I discussed that recollection in 2001/2002 as being one of the pieces of the jigsaw which eventually convinced me that 'autoimmune' disease just had to be caused by infection...
 

kelly well
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 Posted: Thu Apr 24th, 2008 05:52

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Amy, I posted a comment at the end of your article. As a previous RN in a Newborn Intensive Care you were so right in many of your observations.

Not only are the babies exposed to such virulent "bugs" during the perinatal period  but the nurses become ill as well.  It amazes me that any of us come out alive from the exposure of such environments.  Alive....,but not unscathed.   Thanks for your hard work, kelly well

Last edited on Thu Apr 24th, 2008 05:53 by kelly well



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Ames
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 Posted: Fri Apr 25th, 2008 18:36

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Thanks for posting Kelly. I notice that my friends who are nurses are already dealing with a plethora of Th1 symptoms.

Well, I'm back in New York City after a successful journey to Sweden. As you probably know, I joined Dr. Marshall and Meg at the Days of Molecular Medicine Conference at the Karolinska Institute where I gave my own poster presentation. As I wrote in the DMM thread, my poster and Dr. Marshall's work in general was well received and I had a great time mingling with the other scientists at the conference.

The following piece on Bacteriality describes my experience at Karolinska in greater detail. After the piece there are links to two videos. One is the video that Dr. Marshall already put up under the Karolinska thread. The other is a short out-takes video that Paul created with some of the extra footage.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/25/dmm/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Fri Apr 25th, 2008 18:37 by Ames



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jcwat101
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 Posted: Fri Apr 25th, 2008 22:39

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Amy,

So glad to read all about how well the MP went over at the conference.  Thanks for a great article and thanks to Paul for the video -- almost felt like I was there with you all.

Joyce



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 Posted: Fri Apr 25th, 2008 22:45

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Yes! Thanks to Dr. Marshall, Meg, Amy (and Paul) for all the incredible hard work... and with videos to prove it!

Also, while videos whet my appetite, your article Amy really got me excited about the exposure the MP enjoyed at DMM!



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Cocoa
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 Posted: Sat Apr 26th, 2008 00:47

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Hi Amy,

Thanks for the great article on Dr. Marshall's, Meg's and your experiences at Karolinska and thank you all for your fantastic work.

I have a question about something in the article located at http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/25/dmm/#comment-3472. You wrote that:

... Dr. Marshall had two small video players velcroed to his poster that ran videos of L-form bacteria inside the blood of a patient with CFS. The blood, which is absolutely overtaken by long biofilm tubules with bacteria inside, was a rather large wake-up call to those researchers who incorrectly consider the blood to be sterile.

I am interested to learn more about this research. Who conducted this research and do you have any more information about this on your site or can refer me to further information about this?

Thank you and regards, Cocoa:)

Last edited on Sat Apr 26th, 2008 00:50 by Cocoa



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