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Prof Trevor Marshall
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Please take a look at "A Research Revolution" at URL
http://www.newsweek.com/id/68221

Andy Grove was Time's 'Man of the Year' in 1997.

From the outset we have modeled the Foundation, and its study sites, on open collaboration. Every single piece of data you folk report goes into the database and it is available not only to us, and to the FDA, but also to researchers who come along in the future, and who might have some better ideas of their own to add.

I saw this model being used in the 1980's to fuel the BBS revolution, 1990s for the development of open source software (GNU and Linux), and also feeding the early development of the Internet. So it is not entirely my idea. I am sure Andy Grove is very familiar with how it drove the advance of computer technology.

I think Dr Grove would be very interested to hear about our work in this Foundation. If any of you have some moments spare that you can use to try to contact Andy Grove, or his staff, and let them know that there is a new way to conduct clinical studies, and it does work, and it is producing answers right now, I would be very appreciative.

Suggest he should look at Amy's report about young Matt's recovery from neurological disease. It is at URL http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/28/interview6/

Many hands make light work :):)
 

Last edited on Tue Nov 6th, 2007 14:37 by Prof Trevor Marshall

Russ
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This is a great quote:

"The peer review system in grant making and in academic advancement has the major disadvantage of creating conformity of thoughts and values. It's a modern equivalent of a Middle Ages guild, where you have to sing a particular way to get grants, promotions and tenure. The pressure to conform [to prevailing ideas of what causes diseases and how best to find treatments for them] means you lose the people who want to get up and go in a different direction. There is no place for the wild ducks. The result is more sameness and less innovation. What we need is a cultural revolution in the research community, academic and non-academic. We need to give wild ducks the opportunity to emerge and quack their way to success. But cultural change can be driven only by action at the top."

Dr. Marshall, I guess you are a "wild duck",.  :):):)  (In the same way that Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton were "wild ducks"!) 

kathleen
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Hi.

I just blogged Andy Grove and Esther Dyson about the MP - who knows? Maybe they'll look at the website and contact you. They both like the internet and science, are very interested in medical research and have public voices, being regular guests on Chalie Rose.

Next, to find someone who can get YOU on Chalie Rose...

XXOOO Kathleen

Prof Trevor Marshall
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I met Esther back in the 1980s. She and I used to attend the Silicon Valley IEEE Workshops at Asilomar, back then. When discussing how to design better computers was all the rage... I doubt she would remember me, but who knows?...
 

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Esther was on Charlie Rose about 2 months ago and professed a stong interest in innovative health research. More like the million dollar personal scan type of thing, but then she didn't know about your work.

You never know - maybe one of them will email you - I hope!

XXOO Kathleen

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BBSes - very popular over Ham Radio, via packet radio technology. I love it.

Oh my, and here http://bbsdocumentary.dreamhost.com/photos/127leif/ 
is bbs running on  Commodore C64, i used to have this computer. Good old days. :) I think i will telnet this particular c64 as soon as I will find out where is telnet client on my windows vista.


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Here's some more grist for Andy Grove's mill: a report on a rare Borreliosis fatality that strongly associates the patient's Parkinsons with Lyme:

http://www.canlyme.com/lymepark.html

Kathleen, can you try to pump this through to Mr. Grove?

My Lyme was diagnosed as Parkinsons by doctors who don't believe in Lyme. Of course I was offered Levdopa.

Jeff

Edit from Trevor: Please don't talk with Andy Grove about Lyme causing Parkinsons. It is not true, Borrelia does not cause Parkinsons, and the assertion  makes us look like quacks. Parkinsons is found all over the world, in climates where Borrelia is not present.

 

Last edited on Wed Nov 7th, 2007 06:05 by Prof Trevor Marshall

kathleen
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Hi.

I don't have any special access to Mr. Grove. I just left a message on his blog. I'll try to forward your link, or you can google him and send it.

Who knows, he might respond to just plain us?

Kathleen

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This from Google with an entry of "Contact Andy Grove"

Andy Grove on Code Success: Andy Grove

Note from Trevor: The wrong Andy Grove, so I am deleting the rest of the links
 

Last edited on Wed Nov 7th, 2007 05:26 by Prof Trevor Marshall

Jeff
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Sorry Shrn, but yours is not the same Andy Groves. If I can manage the time, I will snail-mail Mr. Groves at Stanford.

Linda J
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I agree with Mr. Grove to a certain extent, but dealing with human beings is a far cry from dealing with computers, because a mistake with computers doesn’t have nearly the same repercussions that mistakes in medical research pose to human beings. Economic loss is a far cry from loss of life or disability. When dealing with human diseases, mistakes can cost major disability, pain, and death; a price that makes economic loss pale in comparison. This is one of the arguments for why medical research is going at such a snails pace. And I think that it is a valid one, since being harmed by research for the sake of progress in research is just as heinous as the Nazi science experiments on people were.

 

Of course, all those people who are subjects of studies who are not being helped end up also suffering and dying who might otherwise be saved. But medical research hasn’t advanced far enough to allow them to proceed without being cautious to a significant degree. With a computer, if something doesn’t work, you just get rid of the mistake, go at it from a different direction, and nobody mourns over the loss of that computer. With people, it is a different ballgame.

 

He is right about the fact that the peer review system is limiting diversity in research, and as a result research in general is being locked into unproductive directions. But there is a growing trend towards people doing their own searching for answers, instead of just blindly accepting the word of their doctors. And they are driving research in new directions.

 

There is research in areas that wouldn’t have otherwise been done if people hadn’t started looking for answers themselves. If people’s willingness to take things into their own hands hadn’t developed, Dr. Marshall’s ability to do the research that he does wouldn’t exist. So there are changes happening. Just not the changes that Mr. Grove would like to see in mainstream research.

 

It seems to me that he isn’t making the same efforts to look at alternative possibilities for treating his disorder. He is still expecting someone else to find the answers for him and hand them to him without any effort on his part. So of course all he sees is l-dopa.

 

The vast majority of people who are on the Marshall Protocol are people who weren’t just recruited for a research study, or people being covertly watched. They are people who have stopped depending on the medical system to provide answers for them, and started hunting for those answers themselves. So to some degree I don’t think it is just medical research that is slowing down the progress of medicine, but the general lack of people willing to push past the medical system to find answers for themselves, rather than waiting for someone else to hand it to them on a silver platter. What makes the Marshall Protocol successful is the determination of the people on it to fight for their right to choose medical care for themselves, rather than just having to depend on a doctor to hand them all the answers.

 

If Mr. Grove were really seeking answers, he would have found the Marshall Protocol by now. It’s out there in plain sight on the internet, and has been around for long enough that if Mr. Grove had been looking, he would have found it by now. Anyone who starts searching for answers can stumble across it. If I can put two and two together, Mr. Grove could, too. But the article makes it clear that he is still expecting his doctors to find the answers for him. And all he can do is complain about the slow progress. He is handicapped from being able to do anything about it for himself beyond complaining.

 

And I have no doubt that if someone hands him the answer, or points him to the Marshall Protocol, he likely won’t be bothered to actually look it over for himself, but instead will depend on those same doctors who are the mainstream researchers. In other words, he won’t accept wild ducks any more than peer reviewed publishers will.

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Linda,
If everybody who could be helped by the MP were to come to this study-site it would collapse under the load, and none of you would be able to get through to get help. The moderators are already stretched to their limits.

What Andy Grove is saying is that the methodology being used to spend the huge amount of money being provided by the public for scientific research is totally wrong. There is no accountability. None at all. And that lack of accountability stretches all the way from the medical schools, to the medical journals, through PhRMA, to the NIH and the FDA.

This Foundation is here because volunteers are working their knuckles to the bone trying to help folk who are ill. The staff at NIH are quite content just to draw their paychecks, and, as Jim Kiley said when he spoke at our Chicago conference, not one penny is spent by NIH in search of a cure. It is spent to advance individual academic careers. That is what NIH sees as the job it has been given, to advance academic careers, not to find cures (take a look at his slides, he has a slide showing exactly that).

Andy Grove would not be using Google to look for this study-site because we are an anomaly. Too good to be true. We need to let him know that it exists, at least for the present, and that the folk here have achieved a breakthrough beyond his imagination.

And, sad to say, unless we can transition to a properly funded model it will be very hard for us to continue in operation as the number of members continues to grow.

That's why it is so important for us to engage mainstream medicine right now. Not next year. Right now.

Trevor

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I contacted Sharon Begley, the author of the article "A Research Revolution" as published in Newsweek magazine, asking her to forward Dr. Marshall's comments.  I contacted Dr. Andy Grove's office at Intel, and sent an email to his assistant.  Therefore,   I believe we have contacted Andy Grove.

Sherry

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Thanks Sherry. You live in Andy's backyard :) Let's wait and see if there is any follow-up.
 

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Thought I'd add that when informing others about the MP, I've found it helpful to mention or include a link to the CDC paper published last year which stated that "infectious agents likely determine more cancers, immune-mediated syndromes, neurodevelopmental disorders, and other chronic conditions than currently appreciated." 

I think many people's initial reaction to the idea that things like cancer and diabetes are caused by chronic infection is that this is "crazy talk" that couldn't possibly be true.  But show them that CDC paper and maybe some similar papers published by reasearchers at Stanford University (http://tinyurl.com/4akm7, http://tinyurl.com/ybfo8l, http://tinyurl.com/yxlqks), and then suddenly they realize that this isn't "crazy talk" at all, and they become a lot more interested and curious.

Along those same lines, I've had the thought that maybe that CDC paper and others like it should be pointed out more prominently on MP.com and/or ARF.org.  For those of us who are sick and come here desperate for a treatment that works, we end up reading the site for days and will eventually find our way to the page that lists these and other studies (ironically, I just quickly looked for that page and couldn't find it).  But for someone like Mr. Grove, who visits the site after we contact him about the MP, he may only spend 5-10 minutes of his busy time looking at the site and it would be a shame if he dismissed it as a crazy theory without ever realizing that there are "mainstream" researchers from places like the CDC and Stanford that also feel that chronic infection is the cause of many diseases. 

I think once an "outsider" realizes that the idea of chronic infection causing all these diseases is a "legitimate" theory, they will be more likely to spend the time it takes to absorb the vast amount of information at this site.  And as we all know, the more you read, the more you realize how obvious it is that Dr. Marshall's model of the pathogenesis of these diseases is spot on.

Just my thoughts.

Last edited on Thu Nov 8th, 2007 04:18 by Russ

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Russ, we need a lot of work done on the study-site, and on the websites in general. Janet produced a new homepage at http://AutoimmunityResearch.org for us, but she and I are really busy right now, and we are basically struggling just to keep things running from day to day.

We desperately need volunteers to create Google Adwords landing pages, and the reference and basic pages you suggest.

Luckily, Amy and Paul have done such a wonderful job with Bacteriality.com and it is currently our best entry-point for people like Dr Groves.

In a few minutes I will put up an announcement about the special session on VDR at the upcoming International Congress on Autoimmunity, and I think this effort, on which we have been working hard  behind the scenes, is also something which would key a Dr Groves into the realization that our science is real and solid.

In February I produced a review paper detailing the Vitamin D action on the immune system which cites the CDC paper you mention (and others). Unfortunately I have not been able to find any journal with the guts to publish it. Far too controversial, unfortunately. Andy might also appreciate a copy of this, and I would be happy to send him one. It illustrates beautifully his argument about publishing and peer review being the gatekeepers of the medieval guilds. If it hadn't been for the way we managed to use the Internet to get the word out, there would be no Marshall Protocol, and no Foundation to push forward our efforts into "mainstream medicine."
 

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Dr. Marshall, as you know my husband is a physcian, (a general and plastic surgeon). He has been astounded by my health improvements to the point where he has begun treating some of his own patients.  We have been thinking about contacting "Dr. Oz" from the Oprah Winfrey television and radio show.  He is about the most "broadminded" MD I have heard speak. (He is a CT surgeon).  He is also much more mainstream and has a wider audience than Andy Groves.  More importantly, his audience expects him to introduce new and unusual therapies and are receptive to the information.  (unlike the conservative crowd of Newsweek, etc.)  It would be great if we could get you on the radio show or (Oprah, TV) 

Let me know if this is a direction in which you would like to proceed.  We have contacts in the entertainment industry and could potentially make this happen. (only if you want)

SSLOUIS

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Sorry, I just realized that I posted the last comment under my sister's log-in which was saved on my computer.

 

SSLOUIS

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sslouis,
Yes, now I am happy that the science is complete. The last breakthrough was understanding how the bacteria could shut off the VDR to stop transcription of the antimicrobial peptides, and that by so doing they produce the cascade of disease manifestations which we see in the inflammatory diseases. So it is a very good time indeed.

Now that we have been invited to sponsor, and chair, the special session on VDR and Vit D at the 6th Intl. Congress on Autoimmunity in Sept 2008, which Greg Blaney and I will be addressing, the run up to that event is going to be a period of momentous change for us.

It is going to take a long time for Medicine (and the public) to lose their obsession with the multitude of separate inflammatory diagnoses which come under the Th1 umbrella (the VDR umbrella) (the Spectrum of VDR disease) but now the science is (relatively) complete, it is a good time for that process to start.

I would appreciate any help you can give us.
 

kathleen
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As I watched Dr. Oz on Oprah last week saying that now we have treatment for Fibromyalgia/CFS, and he was talking about... the usual thousands of dollars worth of basically useless suppilments... I wished that I could think of a way to get through to him. I think that he really means well.

I have a cardiologist at Columbia Prespertarian where I think Dr. Oz is on staff, but I don't know if that would help - maybe.

Coming from another doctor, he just might listen. That would be so great.

Meanwhile I'm working on a letter the the right Andy Grove.

Kathleen

sslouis
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There are sins of ommission and sins of commission.  Perhaps Dr. Oz is simply suffering from sins of ommission.  Like most MD's (according to my husband) he was taught to think inside the box.  Surgeons especially, cannot go out on a limb because of malpractice.  If a physician does anything that cannot be supported by the "standard of care"  he will have his rear-end handed to him on a platter by a smug jury.  Whether we like it or not, our society has forced Physicians to practice under the narrow scope they use.  I was failed by mainstream medicine but we have society to blame.  As the Practice Manager for my husband my main thought every minute was to make sure that every breath was documented in the event that someone decided to sue.  I completely understand why doctors would want to "put on their blinders" and simply practice what they were taught in Med School.  Once the science behind the MP becomes a bit more utilized, you will see more adoption but at this point the first ones out to breakfast will be the ones taken down by any bullets (lawyers). 

In the meantime....fighting the good fight.

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Perhaps, these excerpts from a link provided by Russ, can allow folks to see why Trevor says that the Th1 inflammation is a soup or stew of bacterial L-forms causing a soup or stew of symptoms, not just one bacteria causing one illnesses....

Found at    http://tinyurl.com/ybfo8l  ....
 
Detection and Identification of Previously Unrecognized Microbial Pathogens
 
David A. Relman, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA, and Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol 4, Number 3, July-September 1998
 
Excerpts:
 
"Explorations of microbial diversity within the external environment have yielded surprising results. Nearly all bacteria and archaea revealed by broad-range sequence "mining" in fresh water sites, oceans, surface soils, and deep geologic niches had not been recognized or ever cultivated in the laboratory. Novel kingdoms of life have been discovered with these genotypic methods (12,13). It has been estimated that only 0.4% of all extant bacterial species have been identified. Does this remarkable lack of knowledge pertain to the subset of microorganisms both capable and accomplished in causing human disease? The molecular methods described above could be applied in several settings in which one might expect to find uncharacterized microbial pathogens."
 
"The human body harbors a 10-fold greater number of microbial cells than human cells. The commensal flora includes microorganisms that occasionally cause disease, especially when host defenses are impaired (due to immunosuppressive drugs, disruption of anatomic barriers, suppression of bacterial flora with antibiotics, or insertion of artificial surfaces). However, in many hosts with impaired conditions and signs and symptoms of infectious disease, an etiologic agent is not identified. If our understanding of microbial diversity within the human-associated commensal flora is as limited as it was of external environments, these clinical observations may not be surprising. That is, the inability to cultivate some of the commensal flora may explain the failure to diagnose related disease. In addition to revolutionizing environmental microbiology, molecular methods may offer rewards for clinical microbiology and the study of internal environmental niches."
 
Pardon me if I have missed seeing this elsewhere on the study forum.  I must ask the medical community... How do you expect to use Koch's Postulates to unravel this complexity?  The surface of knowledge is just barely scratched.  The 21st Century must allow a change in thinking if medicine is to progress.
 
Wishing all wellness!!!  :)
 
Dark Vader...aka, George

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That study is listed among others in this thread in the Essential Information forum:

Studies citing a bacterial cause for chronic diseases


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I watched Oprah also last week and wondered if Dr. Oz might be receptive to learning about the MP.  As I recall he mentioned receiving information about the alternative fibromyalgia treatment from Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum.  The audience member who had sufferred from fibromyalgia pain for 6-7 years was drastically improved by taking Vitamin D as she was found to have low Vit. D levels.  Surprise, surprise that they were low:shock:.  It scared me to think of how many people out there watch and trust Oprah and Dr. Oz and that this misinformation was being broadcasted to the masses.

He did say that he's in a great position because he receives so much information from other doctors about new and alternative medical treatments.

Let's hope he means that and will listen about the MP.


(Sorry if this info. is redundant, just thought I'd throw it out there).

Cindy

p.s.  If you need volunteers some day to be on the Oprah show my husband Brian said he would go...although he's not quite a success story...yet;)

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I was listening to the Dr. Oz show on XMRadio this past Thursday.  He was talking to a Micro-Biologist who is well-published on the use of pro-biotics and fermentation.  The conversation turned to bacteria and Dr. Oz said "The scientific community is starting to present alot of new information that the chronic fatigue syndromes, auto-immune disorders and the drastic increase in allergy syndromes may very well be caused by bacteria.  This does not mean that they are the only cause, but it is certainly gives medicine some new direction if the research proves this to be true"  

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We are getting the message out:
"Thermophilic actinomycetes, mycobacteria and paecilomyces have been associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas. Sarcoidosis is a disease characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas and there is a higher than expected rate of sarcoidosis among people who work or worked in the building,"
This is in a report from the NIOSH, no less. Here is the newspaper article: http://tinyurl.com/3xy29m

Caitiegirl
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Forbes.com is running Andy Groves as part of it's cover story.

http://www.forbes.com/home/leadership/forbes/2008/0128/070.html

Hope the link works. Maybe someone with parkinsons type symptoms or diagnosis could leave a comment on the article. I put my 2 cents worth in.

Mindy

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OK, I chimed in too.  Hope they publish my reply there and I hope that Mr Groves actually reads the comments. 
I would love to be a fly on the wall when he starts to see the information unfold on Dr Marshall's websites.

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I have one observation (which is kind of depressing) concerning Andy's use/support of the Michael J. Fox Institute as was mentioned in the Forbes' article and also I think in the original one.

That observation is,  if you go to the MJF website,  there is no way to just get an email to, say, Michael's personal secretary to ask him to personally have a look at the MP as a possible solution to his problems.

The only thing Trevor or anyone could do to make contact would be to draw up a grant application and submit it.    But,  guess who would be reviewing the application?  The same  Blue Ribbon Panel  of doctors/researchers composed of the Leaders in Their Fields -- and they would reject the MP heretical ideas in an instant.   I am sure MJF never actually looks over any of the applications himself.  Heck, the doctors/researchers themselves probably have interns making the first pass cut even.

So, probably the only way to get MJF's (or Andy Grove's) attention will be to track him down,  ask to shake his hand and pass along the MP address to him in-person.   And if we even got that far,  and he even managed to look over the site and get excited about the info,   the next thing he would do, as all good HeadOfMajorInstitutes/CEO would do  is ask his most trusted science advisor from the same Panel what they thought about the MP -- and once again it would be rejected out of hand.  Unless MJF/Grove had a good stubborn streak that would be the end of that.

kind of sad ....  so we have to just soldier on converting one human at a time until we finally somehow get lucky and the right person finds out and it all takes off.

 

 

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"Andy Grove is to bequeath up to $40 million of his estate to fight Parkinson’s, the disease he has suffered from for several years. Grove will donate the money to the Michael J. Fox Foundation"

Warning: The link to the full story (below) contains profanity - it was written for British eyes, and may offend the sensibilities of some members...
http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/01/11/andy-grove-puts-million-fight


..Trevor..

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I just read this thread through from the beginning and the initial discussion about open-source development makes me think that this is a good place to suggest something I've been thinking about since before you opened the sister site.

I think that the wikimedia software would be a perfect repository for all of the read-only information which is currently scattered through many different threads on this site. It would become your primary entry portal. I could discuss extensively why I think it would improve things, but the most important reasons are that the wikimedia software is designed to disseminate information (bbs software isn't), and that you could spread the burden of information management to a larger group than the few moderators you have here, whose primary task isn't information management but patient monitoring.

I realize that you can't give editing privileges to just anyone, but you have a large cohort now of people in Phase 3 and beyond who could be given access as volunteers to transfer and organize the information.

Just a suggestion.

Laura

p.s. Got my DVDs yesterday. Thank you for the extra set; I am taking it to my doctor this morning. I am hoping to start Benicar this week.

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Laura, you underestimate the expertise that is required to compose and edit the unique information on our study site which is updated on a daily basis.

Most information is in only two forums:
Essential Information About the Marshall Protocol
Marshall Protocol FAQs

Note the new threads of 'Basic Information' pinned to the top of the Essential Information Forum, the Benicar Only Forum and the Benicar and Minocycline Forum.

How can we help you get started on the MP? :)

Prof Trevor Marshall
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I removed a post I had left here earlier. On reflection, I decided that it was not a good time to raise the issues I had canvassed in that post :)
 

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It was just a suggestion! :)

Meg, the serious answer to your question is: I have some food questions I will try to post this morning.

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Hello all,

Hope this is is an acceptable place to post this...

I was diagnosed with Sarcoidosis Jan 2008 and on the advice of my surgeon & pulmonologist, promptly made an appointment to see Dr. Om Sharma at USC.  I have had to wait 2 months to see him.

In the meantime, I have researched sarcoidosis, found the MP, and a willing doctor, and started Benicar today!  Today is Friday, and I just realized my appt. is this coming Monday, Mar 3, 2008.  Too late to cancel.  I may as well just go and get it over with.

The most recent posts on Dr. Sharma are pretty old; I am wondering if anyone has had more recent experience with him.  I'm tempted to just sit there and keep my mouth shut if I am to expect a lecture from him about the uselessness of the MP.  On the other hand, if his attitude has changed at all, or if there is anything I can say or pass along to him that may enlighten him, I'll be happy to do it.

My pulmonologist shut me down with a lecture before I could utter 5 words; I don't want to repeat that experience.

Do any of you have any thoughts about this guy?

Cheers,

Melinda

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15733
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Melinda,
Here is a PDF file of a newsletter from 2004 where Dr Sharma's view of disease is pretty carefully set out.
http://www.sarcoidosisnetwork.org/documents/Jan_Feb_2004.pdf

I have a DVD of a presentation that Dr Sharma made at the 2005 Denver conference saying something like "the only reason sarcoidosis patients don't get better is because they don't take their prednisone diligently."

I don't know what to advise. On one hand, it is best to keep a low profile with Dr Sharma, as he is likely to be called by a hospital Doc if, for example, you were ever admitted for pneumonia. Sharma would exercise the power of life or death over you. His advice to use heavy-handed immunosuppression led to Allen Dawkins' death from massive hospital-acquired-infection, for example. And his advice to Kathy's doctor that she would never recover from her disease most probably led to her being not resuscitated the next time she was admitted to hospital with shortness of breath.

On the other hand, your Doc prescribing the MP may feel it important for you to see Dr Sharma. It's a tough call. But I can assure you that nothing you can say or do would change Dr Sharma's opinion that he knows all there is to know about this disease, and that he is the world's leading expert on the subject.
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~osharma/
 
 

Last edited on Sat Mar 1st, 2008 02:00 by Prof Trevor Marshall

Santa Monica
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Joined: Mon Jan 14th, 2008
Location: Santa Monica, California USA
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Dr. Marshall,

The doc who's prescribing the MP is not the guy who sent me to Dr. Sharma.

I'm tempted to call in "well" and blow off the appointment, then again, my mother, who is all but forcing me to see him and will be at the appointment, may gain some new insight on the MP, which she supports but does not entirely understand.

If I do go and have an unusual experience, I'll share the story, but I have a feeling it'll be more of the same resistance that others have experienced.  I'm actually kind of looking forward to checking out the other sarcoidosis patients in the waiting room; I've never seen anyone else with this disease (that I know of).

Have a great weekend!

Melinda

jr_md
Health Professional
 

Joined: Wed Jun 11th, 2008
Location: Kingston, Ontario Canada
Posts: 12
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Andy Grove just donated 40 million dollars to the Michael J Fox center for Parkinsons, as he himself has contracted the disease.

http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/01/11/andy-grove-puts-million-fight

This is the man you ran intel. A very influential and intelligent man.
I was recently thinking that he should be made aware of Dr Marshalls research.

His involvement, and (hopefully) buy in would certainly propel this protocol forward.

Jim

Sorry, was just reading all the posts on this topic.
I didn't say anything that you didn't already know :)

Last edited on Fri Jun 20th, 2008 12:17 by jr_md

wrotek
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Joined: Thu Dec 30th, 2004
Location: Wroclaw, Poland
Posts: 2900
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I wonder on what type of research these 40 million will be spent. Probably stem cell research

Sallie Q
Support Team


Joined: Sun Jan 25th, 2009
Location: Country_town NSW, Australia
Posts: 5672
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"Favored institutions get more dollars per principal investigator (i.e., laboratory head), which supports larger laboratories. This has surprising impacts on the amount and nature of scientific output.

First, although output increases with increasing lab size, it does not scale proportionately. Second, articles from smaller labs tend to be more innovative and succeed in terms of influence further into the future than those of larger labs, which tend to develop existing ideas.

There is high value for research conducted by smaller laboratories and less-well-funded institutions, challenging the notion that bigger is better."
The practice of favoring already well-funded institutions with higher grant application success rates and larger award sizes, despite their lower productivity (Fig. 1), is a clear example of the Matthew effect in action."  
Wayne P. Wahls PNAS July 2, 2019



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