The Marshall Protocol Study Site Home

Search
   
Members

Calendar

Help

Home
Search by username
   Not logged in - Login | Register 


Th1 inflammation affects 15% of all US teenagers
 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall
 

New Topic

Reply

Print
AuthorPost
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15799
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Mar 6th, 2009 10:40

Quote

Reply
A paper has just been published which examines the impact of changing the definition of "Vitamin D Deficiency" definition from 11ng/ml to 20ng/ml. We can use it to estimate the Th1 prevalence in US teenagers.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/123/3/797
 
The 20ng/ml charts show us the percentage of Th1 disease pretty closely, as this is the level at which immunosuppression starts, and which the immune system will try to regulate its own 25-D production below.
 
So here is Figure 1 from that paper - showing 15% of all US teenagers, and 50% of African American teenagers, have levels of 25-D which indicate (to me) some level of Th1 disease. There are lots of approximations I am making here, but I am happy with the overall accuracy of this extrapolation :)


Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4122
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Mar 6th, 2009 14:46

Quote

Reply
If I were to follow your logic, would it not be proper to say that these statistics imply that 85% of teenagers are "at risk" of TH1 disease as 85% have values of 25D greater than or equal to 20 ng/ml which I am assuming mostly results from passive consumption of dietary D.  Can't imagine teenagers taking vitamin pills.  But I think it might be a hard argument to claim that all of them already have TH1 disease.  Cynthia



____________________
MP start 10/08,break 1/16 - 9/16, Spondylitis'97,early Diverticulosis'98,early AMD'08,Calcium anomaly'95,TypeII Diabetes(?)'02,Degenerative hip disease'12, 25D=10.8 May'18 (preMP 125D/25D=47/43) https://marshallprotocol.com/forum30/13911-2.html
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15799
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Mar 6th, 2009 16:12

Quote

Reply
Yes, I did take the easier argument by looking at the mean (of about 30ng/ml) and focusing on the lower outliers.

Actually, it really doesn't matter whether you focus on the 2% that are almost certainly very ill (<11ng/ml), or the 14% that are most probably ill (<20ng/ml), or the approx 50% who are above 30ng/ml,  clearly ingesting too much of the steroid, and who will eventually be ill. It is bad news for the nation, no matter what...
 
 

Last edited on Fri Mar 6th, 2009 16:37 by Prof Trevor Marshall

garyv
.


Joined: Wed Feb 13th, 2008
Location: Richmond, Virginia USA
Posts: 164
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Mar 7th, 2009 03:38

Quote

Reply
Dr. Marshall, forgive me if I'm being dense here, but I remember reading this statement somewhere:
"the maximum level in a healthy person is about 18ng/ml"
Now you seem to be saying a healthy level (for an unsupplemented teenager) would be between 20 and 30ng/ml?

Have there been new findings to negate the previous 18ng/ml max?

My first 25(OH)D test was 26ng/ml, done 3 years ago when I was supplementing D3 around 800 IU /day. Although in reasonably decent health (at age 53 able to run 5 miles/day and experiencing a good energy level all day long), I was also experiencing premature aging symptoms, clearly overrun with Th1 inflammation and in a state of D dysregulation.

I do realize my 1,25(OH)D would likely have tested quite high at that time, so would it be true for unsupplemented teenagers as well that the range of "healthy" 25(OH)D levels would depend on the 1,25(OH)D level?

Also, there seems to be a big push to supplement infants with D3 these days, since it's been found that mother's breast milk typically contains very little D. Rather than being a giant clue that infants aren't designed to ingest D3, this instead is taken as a sign of "deficiency" by the arrogant medical profession (who also years ago told mothers, mine included, that baby formula manufacturers knew better than Mother Nature how to feed infants).

Do we have any clues as to what would be a "healthy" 25(OH)D level in an infant?



____________________
DxOsteoporosis/osteoarthritis/Raynauds/paresthesia/tinnitus 1,25D69 Ph1Mar08 Ph3Jan09 25D32(May11) no meds or NOIRs, covered in direct sunlight only
"Fear not the path of truth for the lack of people walking on it.” –Arabic proverb
Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4122
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Mar 7th, 2009 09:27

Quote

Reply
By the way Dr. Marshall, I think most of us are not able to see the full article, just the abstract, so some of your comments can't be followed too well.  Cynthia

PS. Did they actually say in the full article, as reported in Reuters.
"Overweight children and adults appear to be at elevated risk because vitamin D is stored in body fat. The more vitamin D that gets taken up by fat tissue, the less active vitamin there is in the blood."
If so, this is hard to believe they would have said it, as tho fat was a D vacuum cleaner with infinite storage capacity, and there is no regulatory mechanisms for 25D in the blood.



____________________
MP start 10/08,break 1/16 - 9/16, Spondylitis'97,early Diverticulosis'98,early AMD'08,Calcium anomaly'95,TypeII Diabetes(?)'02,Degenerative hip disease'12, 25D=10.8 May'18 (preMP 125D/25D=47/43) https://marshallprotocol.com/forum30/13911-2.html
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15799
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sat Mar 7th, 2009 10:23

Quote

Reply
Do we have any clues as to what would be a "healthy" 25(OH)D level in an infant?

Gary, That is the easiest of your questions, the answer is ZERO.

The human body makes all the 25-D it needs within its nucleated cells, any supplementation from food, sunlight, etc, is unhelpful to homeostasis. When the ingested/irradiated amounts of 25-D in the bloodstream reach about 20ng/ml, the 25-D which leaches into the cell cytoplasm (through the cell wall) begins to affect the proper operation of those nucleated cells.

As for what is a healthy level of 25-D in today's population, the big unknown is the effect of worldwide supplementation of the food chain. All my guesses are purely that - educated guesses. But I do expect a healthy US resident, drinking a normal amount of milk, etc (no vitamin pills) to be in the 20-30 ng/ml range. If that is depressed, it is a sign of illness, and if elevated, a sign of excessive supplementation.
 
 


 Current time is 21:55



* We can help you understand chronic disease, but only your physician is licensed to give you medical care *

Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Entire site Copyright © 2004-2020 Autoimmunity Research Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Click here to view our PRIVACY POLICY
Page processed in 0.0474 seconds (82% database + 18% PHP). 18 queries executed.