The Marshall Protocol Study Site Home

 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall  
AuthorPost
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15742
Status:  Offline
 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/15/us-food-bacteria-study-idUSTRE73E65L20110415
 
So now we know.
For sure, not just guessing :)

..Trevor..

ps: If the FDA know the bacteria are "always going to be there" and that they are antibiotic resistant, then surely these bacteria would be harmful, de-facto? Is the FDA admitting that they already know in-vitro studies of activity and resistance of bacteria bear no resemblance to the in-vivo environment?
 

Verena
Member*


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 1137
Status:  Offline
Trevor,

thank you for the link. It does not really come as a surprise. Especially that turkey is the animal with the heaviest load. Not going into details here, though...

Since ages I am trying to figure out, which Antibiotics are beeing used on the farms, but the only information I got so far is "Antibiotics". Is there a possibility to get informations about the actual types beeing used? Are they using Tetracyclines f.e.?

Best, Verena

Last edited on Fri Apr 15th, 2011 10:50 by Verena

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4923
Status:  Offline
Brief report article:

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/04/14/cid.cir181.full.pdf

Conflicts of interest statement seen at end of article written by Lance B. Price et al. This article is currently being cited differently over major news outlets, so feel free to get informed at the source. 

Notice figure 2 Phylogenetic relationships. Turkey, pork and chicken each sport a dominant different resistance spectrum (even beef has a dominant pattern, but it seems to be a good place to find a more balanced risk mix of many).

I only point that out because a lot of media articles are citing turkey meat as a real big problem, but the way I see it, beef has a more even distribution across many different strains. Knowing how these little beasties like to work together in teams, I'd worry more about raw beef coming on with a well-trained team effort.

The antibiotics to which the staph was resistant included: penicillin and ampicillin; erythromycin; tetracycline; oxacillin, the more modern form of the drug methicillin; the drug combination quinupristin/dalfopristin, known as Synercid; the fluoroquinolones levofloxacin (Levaquin) and ciprofloxacin (Cipro); and the last-resort drugs for very serious staph infections vancomycin and daptomycin. One staph isolate was resistant to nine different antibiotics.

I'll have another round of olmesartan, instead, please.

CNN's Maria Cohen said it was a "touch" infection problem. Eating cooked meat (ingest no raw meat) and preparing food with careful clean handling was her recommendation.

Terms for "flesh eating" drug-resistant bacteria often include:
MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus)
HA-MRSA (hospital acquired Methicillin-resistant S. aureus)
CA-MRSA (community acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus)

I still think the only way to win personally and collectively as a society is to fully enable everyone's immune system, and learning to work with the environment we are in. But that's just conjecture and speculation on my part after reading a raft of articles about bacteria, virus, fungii, pleomorphs and the like for the last 6 years.

Choose well, get well--Janet

Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4112
Status:  Offline
Seems like those with a leaky gut mentioned in another thread are at the biggest risk, as the bacteria can enter the blood stream/internal tissues without even a how-do-you-do from the immune system.  Cynthia

ChrisMavo
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 1st, 2009
Location: San Francisco, California USA
Posts: 885
Status:  Offline
Interesting!  So the CWD bacteria that caused my ALS probably came from all that rare steak I used to eat!!

With the current sushi craze, especially here on West Coast, they should do this same study on seafood. 

Verena
Member*


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 1137
Status:  Offline
The antibiotics to which the staph was resistant included: penicillin and ampicillin; erythromycin; tetracycline; oxacillin, the more modern form of the drug methicillin; the drug combination quinupristin/dalfopristin, known as Synercid; the fluoroquinolones levofloxacin (Levaquin) and ciprofloxacin (Cipro); and the last-resort drugs for very serious staph infections vancomycin and daptomycin. One staph isolate was resistant to nine different antibiotics.
Oh my god....

mvanwink5
Support Team


Joined: Fri Nov 5th, 2010
Location: Newland, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3540
Status:  Offline
Eating a salad from products that set on the same check out counter ringing up that dripping hamburger package can give you more than you bargained for....

garyv
.


Joined: Wed Feb 13th, 2008
Location: Richmond, Virginia USA
Posts: 164
Status:  Offline
ChrisMavo wrote: Interesting!  So the CWD bacteria that caused my ALS probably came from all that rare steak I used to eat!!
Not likely, Chris. Heat can actually cause bacteria to convert to the CWD form to survive.

The MP Wiki states:

Markova has provided evidence that E. coli can survive lethal treatments such as boiling or autoclaving (subjecting equipment to high pressure steam at 121 °C or more) by transitioning into the L-form.http://www.biolsci.org/v06p0303.htm

The problem with antibiotic-resistant bacteria in commercial meat is primarily due to growers' routine use of antibiotics mixed into animal feed to prevent their sickly animals from dying.

To maximize profits the current dominant livestock industry keeps its pigs and chickens cooped up in windowless buildings in cages so small they can't turn around, never seeing sunshine or green earth, and forced to breathe noxious, ammonia-fouled air. Its beef cattle are kept in huge malodorous waste-generating feedlots, standing up to their knees in mud and manure, injected with steroids, doused with pesticides, forced to eat a dusty, ground-up ration laced with antibiotics and chicken manure.

There is another way to produce meat which is much tastier and more nutritious and much less contaminated--a way which not only respects the animals and the natural environment they inhabit, but also brings viability to the small family farmer and community scale agriculture. And, most importantly for this discussion, this other way does not require antibiotics.

It's called grass-based farming, and you can view a brief list of its principles here:
http://www.polyfacefarms.com/principles.aspx

This is the farm BTW where I've been getting all my pork and chickens for over 20 years. Joel Salatin was also my mentor when I began raising my own grass-fed beef 16 years ago.

In short, raising animals on fresh fertile green pasture in the open air and sunshine, insures that they live happy stress-free lives with strong immune systems which easily fend off microbes without man's help, just as their predecessors on the Great Prairie, the great thundering herds of bison, did for millennia.

An excellent video about all this is "Food, Inc.," clips of which you can view here:
http://www.ovguide.com/movies_tv/food_inc.htm

BTW Chris, I prefer not to stress my bacteria with heat to push them into converting to CWD forms, so I eat all of this wonderful grass-fed meat and fat completely RAW.:D



Last edited on Sat Apr 16th, 2011 06:17 by garyv

chef bama
Member


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 210
Status:  Offline
Just another scare story. Big Ag makes a much higher profit from carbs.

Recently I read that Big Ag has to feed cattle their own special "probiotic" mix to help them digest when fed grains rather than grass. I'm curious what that mix is, and how much of it gets in the meat.


ChrisMavo
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 1st, 2009
Location: San Francisco, California USA
Posts: 885
Status:  Offline
Thanks for the interesting post Gary!  We have some good grass-fed meat places here in San Francisco.  I guess we'll start getting our meat products exclusively from them!

tammy1000
inactive member
 

Joined: Wed Apr 7th, 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 68
Status:  Offline
Generally speaking do the bacteria levels in fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, etc. compare with bacterial load in meats?

 

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 15742
Status:  Offline
tammy1000 wrote: Generally speaking do the bacteria levels in fruits, vegetables, nuts, grains, etc. compare with bacterial load in meats?
In general -- I have found anything imported from a known-good source works out well, IMO. Remember that wherever you get them from, all plants or animals will be carrying a microbiota. The key is to find sources which you can enjoy without too many after-effects. Oh - and I use a cetylpyridinium chloride mouthwash several times a day.. :) :) Researchers of the salivary microbiome found (microscopic) wheat plants growing in their subject's mouths...

We buy meat and nuts from Trader Joes. Meat is usually Australian or NZ lamb (which are not battery-farmed) or the occasional imported beef-steak. I have also found TJ's imported  Canadian bacon is pretty innocuous (and sandwiches taste good with minimum effort).

I have personally had to pick and choose nuts from time to time. At one stage they were selling air-roasted peanuts which would give blisters on my tongue if any remnants were left in the mouth. Probably full of bugs, I decided (anecdotally), but generally any of their dry-roasted almonds or cashews seem fine.

Imported cheeses - Trader Joe's sells Dutch Gouda at $4.99 per pound -- are what we use. Fruits tend to be very variable, I try to stick to Bosc pears and Asian pears, but that is primarilly a taste preference... Tropical Papaya is really nice from time to time.

Glass bottled Whole Foods Markets 1%-fat Pasteurized milk (Vit A, but no Vit D added) is our staple milk (Brougiere's factories, I think). TJ's imported Irish butter is nice.
 
Am looking forward to enjoying the Korean beef when we visit Korea in a couple of weeks. I love beef  from Asian sources... In general, I have no trouble eating when traveling, although I have recently started to carry Bactrim with me following a bout of diarrhea after returning from China (once)... Oh and the Shabu-Shabu meal Liz and I enjoyed in Little Tokyo the other day (frozen imported Japanese beef) was reallly, really, nice...
 

chef bama
Member


Joined: Fri Dec 18th, 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 210
Status:  Offline
I haven't used the imported lamb, TJs or otherwise. for years, because it gives me a queasy nauseous feeling for a day or two afterwards ... have often wondered why. The only clue I have found is that some bacteria can live/multiply at refrigerated & frozen temperatures -- listeria was the main culprit. So although the meat is shipped cold, sitting in its cryovac bag, the bacteria in it continue to multiply in transit.

Last edited on Sun Apr 17th, 2011 09:10 by chef bama

ChrisMavo
Member


Joined: Sat Aug 1st, 2009
Location: San Francisco, California USA
Posts: 885
Status:  Offline
We also shop at Trader Joe's for a lot of our food.  I also enjoy their Organic Dark Chocolate bars!!  Reasonable price, good quality most the time ... and satisfies my sweet tooth!

stuckpac
Health Professional
 

Joined: Sat Sep 27th, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 50
Status:  Offline
I have found the Organic Valley Organic NonFat Dry Milk Powder with no vit. D added to be a reasonable milk substitute when in an area where I can't find any whole milk with no added Vit. D.  You can get it on Amazon....

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4923
Status:  Offline
Verena,
Antibiotic function on the MP has been noticed by our group. Recent changes in suggestions for abx use on MP reflect that comprehension.

So many expect the solution to be what we take for a quick fix, but preventative may be the solution with long-term enabled immune functionality, instead.

Best to all--Janet

 

TXPam
member


Joined: Sun Mar 13th, 2011
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 315
Status:  Offline
"Reportedly, about 70 percent of the ground beef sold at supermarkets today contains pink slime."

Found this info on "pink slime" featured today on the Ask Dr. Weil website & thought it might be of interest:

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401111/Purging-Pink-Slime.html

We buy organic ground meat & then freeze it before using. But for anyone on a tight budget, or unable to find organic meat in their area, avoiding pink slime may be more challenging.  

 

eClaire
member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
Trevor wrote: "cetylpyridinium chloride mouthwash several times a day.. :) :) Researchers of the salivary microbiome found (microscopic) wheat plants growing in their subject's mouths..."

Does anyone know any brand names for mouthwash with this in it so I don't have to read every mouthwash label on the shelves?

Also, wheat plants growing in subjects mouths gives a new twist on celiac's disease. :shock:

Thanks, Claire

TXPam
member


Joined: Sun Mar 13th, 2011
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 315
Status:  Offline
Hi Claire. In another thread, Dr. M. wrote about this mouthwash:

Crest 'Pro-Health' 'Night'
with the active ingredient, Cetylpyridinium Chloride. Other ingredients were: water, glycerin, flavor (minty), zinc lactate, methylparaben, sodium saccharin, sucralose, propylparaben, poloxamer 407.

Though I can't vouch for whether these are MP-approved, here's a link that may show you more:

http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?id=29775

If you copy "Cetylpyridinium Chloride" into the search box, you'll get additional brands shown, with photos of their ingredients labels. Can't guarantee that every one will have the Cetylpyridinium Chloride, but might make searching for products a bit easier.

 

findinganswers
member
 

Joined: Wed Dec 20th, 2006
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 355
Status:  Offline
The first time I used Crest Pro-Health Multi-Protection Rinse, Clear Mint (this kind does not contain stannous flouride), I became very spacey (mentally) and my short-term memory problems increased (this lasted until early afternoon on the day of the morning I first tried it). I didn't use it for about a week after that, then started using it again only at night before bed and in a smaller amount (like every other night). It still seemed to cause the mental symptoms for from about 4 days to a week or so (and during this time I did not use it every single day). After that, I started using it every day, then in the morning and at night, and I did not notice any of the mental symptoms any more.

Last edited on Sun May 20th, 2012 17:17 by findinganswers

TXPam
member


Joined: Sun Mar 13th, 2011
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 315
Status:  Offline
One more reason to avoid commercially produced beef

Found this article about the anti-asthma drug, Zilmax - and why it's finding its way into the commercially-raised beef industry: 

Why Beef Is Becoming More Like Chicken

Pgeek - shortened link.

Jermack
Member
 

Joined: Sun May 4th, 2008
Location: Boulder, Colorado USA
Posts: 132
Status:  Offline
http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.3145.html

pgeek
Support Team


Joined: Thu Dec 17th, 2009
Location: Israel
Posts: 2220
Status:  Offline
Jermack wrote:
http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.3145.html

Perhaps a little off-topic, but interesting nonetheless. If this (somewhat mouse-based) research is applicable in humans, it's another example of a common supplement with deleterious long=term effects:

Abstract

Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline and phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We demonstrate here that metabolism by intestinal microbiota of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice. Omnivorous human subjects produced more TMAO than did vegans or vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. The presence of specific bacterial taxa in human feces was associated with both plasma TMAO concentration and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predicted increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA and TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but this did not occur if intestinal microbiota was concurrently suppressed. In mice with an intact intestinal microbiota, dietary supplementation with TMAO or either carnitine or choline reduced in vivo reverse cholesterol transport. Intestinal microbiota may thus contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and CVD risk.

Markt9452
Member*


Joined: Fri Oct 26th, 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 983
Status:  Offline
borrelia poultry red mites

Search results

Items: 19

Select item 55379311.Poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) infestation: a broad impact parasitological disease that still remains a significant challenge for the egg-laying industry in Europe

Annie Sigognault Flochlay, Emmanuel Thomas, Olivier Sparagano

Parasit Vectors. 2017; 10: 357. Published online 2017 Aug 1. doi: 10.1186/s13071-017-2292-4PMCID: PMC5537931

ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.5M

Citation

Select item 59133672.First report of Coxiella burnetii and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in poultry red mites, Dermanyssus gallinae (Mesostigmata, Acari), related to urban outbreaks of dermatitis in Italy

D.A. Raele, D. Galante, N. Pugliese, G. La Salandra, M. Lomuto, M. Assunta Cafiero

New Microbes New Infect. 2018 May; 23: 103–109. Published online 2018 Feb 22. doi: 10.1016/j.nmni.2018.01.004PMCID: PMC5913367

ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.4M


CitationSelect item 54413483.Is there a Lyme-like disease in Australia? Summary of the findings to date

Melissa Judith Chalada, John Stenos, Richard Stewart BradburyOne Health. 2016 Dec; 2: 42–54. Published online 2016 Apr 7. doi: 10.1016/j.onehlt.2016.03.003PMCID: PMC5441348ArticlePubReaderPDF–725KCitationSelect item 39109094.

Laboratory Identification of Arthropod Ectoparasites

Blaine A. Mathison, Bobbi S. PrittClin Microbiol Rev. 2014 Jan; 27(1): 48–67. doi: 10.1128/CMR.00008-13PMCID: PMC3910909ArticlePubReaderPDF–4.4MCitation

Select item 36689935.Zoonoses in pet birds: review and perspectives

Geraldine Boseret, Bertrand Losson, Jacques G Mainil, Etienne Thiry, Claude Saegerman

Vet Res. 2013; 44(1): 36. Published online 2013 May 20. doi: 10.1186/1297-9716-44-36PMCID: PMC3668993ArticlePubReaderPDF–359KCitation

Select item 33100886.Bartonellaquintana Transmission from Mite to Family with High Socioeconomic Status

Oto Melter, Mardjan Arvand, Jiří Votýpka, Dagmar HulínskáEmerg Infect Dis. 2012 Jan; 18(1): 163–165. doi: 10.3201/eid1801.110186PMCID: PMC3310088ArticlePubReaderPDF–214KCitation

Select item 35652437.Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis

Walter BerghoffOpen Neurol J. 2012; 6: 158–178. Published online 2012 Dec 28. doi: 10.2174/1874205X01206010158PMCID: PMC3565243ArticlePubReaderPDF–327KCitation

Select item 37265138.Spatial disaggregation of tick occurrence and ecology at a local scale as a preliminary step for spatial surveillance of tick-borne diseases: general framework and health implications in Belgium

Valerie Obsomer, Marc Wirtgen, Annick Linden, Edwin Claerebout, Paul Heyman, Dieter Heylen, Maxime Madder, Jo Maris, Maude Lebrun, Wesley Tack, Laetitia Lempereur, Thierry Hance, Georges Van Impe

Parasit Vectors. 2013; 6: 190. Published online 2013 Jun 22. doi: 10.1186/1756-3305-6-190PMCID: PMC3726513ArticlePubReaderPDF–3.1MCitation

Select item 31183819.Parasites in pet reptilesAleksandra Vergles Rataj, Renata Lindtner-Knific, Ksenija Vlahović, Urška Mavri, Alenka DovčActa Vet Scand. 2011; 53(1): 33. Published online 2011 May 30. doi: 10.1186/1751-0147-53-33PMCID: PMC3118381ArticlePubReaderPDF–2.0MCitation

Select item 308564310.The relevance of tick bites to the production of IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose

Scott P. Commins, Hayley R. James, Elizabeth A. Kelly, Shawna L. Pochan, Lisa J. Workman, Matthew S. Perzanowski, Katherine M. Kocan, John V. Fahy, Lucy W. Nganga, Eva Ronmark, Philip J. Cooper, Thomas A. E. Platts-MillsJ Allergy Clin Immunol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 May 3.Published in final edited form as: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011 May; 127(5): 1286–1293.e6. Published online 2011 Mar 31. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2011.02.019PMCID: PMC3085643ArticlePubReaderPDF–758KCitation

Select item 571341711.New Insights into the Microbiota of Moth PestsValeria Mereghetti, Bessem Chouaia, Matteo MontagnaInt J Mol Sci. 2017 Nov; 18(11): 2450. Published online 2017 Nov 18. doi: 10.3390/ijms18112450PMCID: PMC5713417ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.4MCitation

Select item 389998412.RNAi in Arthropods: Insight into the Machinery and Applications for Understanding the Pathogen-Vector InterfaceAnnette-Christi Barnard, Ard M. Nijhof, Wilma Fick, Christian Stutzer, Christine Maritz-OlivierGenes (Basel) 2012 Dec; 3(4): 702–741. Published online 2012 Nov 6. doi: 10.3390/genes3040702PMCID: PMC3899984ArticlePubReaderPDF–686KCitation

Select item 477483513.Tick-borne infections in human and animal population worldwideJosé Brites-Neto, Keila Maria Roncato Duarte, Thiago Fernandes MartinsVet World. 2015 Mar; 8(3): 301–315. Published online 2015 Mar 12. doi: 10.14202/vetworld.2015.301-315PMCID: PMC4774835ArticlePubReaderPDF–4.8MCitation

Select item 426550714.Mosquito Akirin as a potential antigen for malaria controlMário da Costa, Renato Pinheiro-Silva, Sandra Antunes, Juan A Moreno-Cid, Ana Custódio, Margarita Villar, Henrique Silveira, José de la Fuente, Ana DomingosMalar J. 2014; 13: 470. Published online 2014 Dec 3. doi: 10.1186/1475-2875-13-470PMCID: PMC4265507ArticlePubReaderPDF–1.0MCitation

Select item 389674615.Control of tick infestations and pathogen prevalence in cattle and sheep farms vaccinated with the recombinant Subolesin-Major Surface Protein 1a chimeric antigenAlessandra Torina, Juan A Moreno-Cid, Valeria Blanda, Isabel G Fernández de Mera, José M Pérez de la Lastra, Salvatore Scimeca, Marcellocalogero Blanda, Maria Elena Scariano, Salvatore Briganò, Rosaria Disclafani, Antonio Piazza, Joaquín Vicente, Christian Gortázar, Santo Caracappa, Rossella Colomba Lelli, José de la FuenteParasit Vectors. 2014; 7: 10. Published online 2014 Jan 8. doi: 10.1186/1756-3305-7-10PMCID: PMC3896746ArticlePubReaderPDF–2.1MCitation

Select item 38549416.A STUDY OF BORRELIA ANSERINA INFECTION (SPIROCHETOSIS) IN TURKEYSEthel McNeil, W. R. Hinshaw, R. E. KisslingJ Bacteriol. 1949 Feb; 57(2): 191–206.PMCID: PMC385494SummaryPage BrowsePDF–3.4MCitationSelect item 199694817.Weekly Reports for JANUARY 14, 1949Public Health Rep. 1949 Jan 14; 64(2): 41–68.PMCID: PMC1996948SummaryPage BrowsePDF–2.9MCitationSelect item 255470818.ReferencesBull World Health Organ. 1964; 30(Suppl): 97–150.PMCID: PMC2554708SummaryPage BrowsePDF–8.9MCitation

Select item 438575919.SFTS Virus in Ticks in an Endemic Area of ChinaShiwen Wang, Jiandong Li, Guoyu Niu, Xianjun Wang, Shujun Ding, Xiaolin Jiang, Chuan Li, Quanfu Zhang, Mifang Liang, Zhenqiang Bi, Dexin LiAm J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Apr 1; 92(4): 684–689. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0008PMCID: PMC4385759ArticlePubReaderPDF–756KCitation

Last edited on Wed May 2nd, 2018 01:46 by Markt9452



* We can help you understand chronic disease, but only your physician is licensed to give you medical care *

Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Entire site Copyright © 2004-2020 Autoimmunity Research Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Click here to view our PRIVACY POLICY
Page processed in 0.0721 seconds (70% database + 30% PHP). 19 queries executed.