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Prof Trevor Marshall
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Dateline: 30 March 2006.
Collecting my current thoughts on the MP, I recently wrote a brief abstract for the DMM2006 conference at the Karolinska Institut in Stockholm. This is an upcoming International conference on Chronic Disease. The abstract has been accepted for presentation. I wanted to let you know my latest thinking about Th1 disease (and give you all an opportunity to 'peer-review' it).

You will note that the intense research I did prior to my FDA presentation helped me see both the Vitamin D deprivation and the Benicar blockade as being one-and-the-same in their effect, as they both enable the VDR nuclear receptor to do its job as the primary activator of innate immunity (remember that "innate immunity" is the 'last line' of defence, while "acquired immunity" is the first line, driven by the generation and recognition of antibodies, etc - it is innate immunity alone that can protect against intraphagocytic pathogens).
Here it is...

VDR Nuclear Receptor Competence is the Key to Recovery from Chronic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease


The VDR Nuclear Receptor is at the heart of human innate immunity, responsible for TLR2, TLR4, CAMP, TACO and IL2 expression[1]. During Th1 immune challenge, the VDR is activated by the endogenous secosteroid 1,25dihydroxyvitamin-D. We have previously described how intra-phagocytic bacterial pathogens are responsible for much chronic inflammatory disease[2,3], and our phase 2 study results have confirmed this pathogenesis. In order to induce recovery from chronic inflammatory disease, it is necessary to restore VDR functionality by removing all exogenous sources of the secosteroid we call ‘Vitamin-D’, and dampen down over-exuberant VDR activity, for example with the ARB Olmesartan[1]. This enables the immune system to recognize the pathogens. To date we have demonstrated recovery from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sarcoidosis, and an assortment of chronic inflammatory diagnoses. This breakthrough is the result of a collaboration between molecular scientists and a disparate group of innovative physicians, facilitated by the Internet. However, the widespread application of this pathogenic understanding will require meticulous translation of the molecular science into conventional clinical precepts.


1. Marshall TG: Molecular genomics offers new insight into the exact mechanism of action of common drugs-ARBs, Statins, and Corticosteroids. FDA CDER Visiting Professor presentation, FDA Biosciences Library Accession QH447.M27 2006.
(Video DVD transcript can be ordered, and a low-resolution version is online at
http://AutoimmunityResearch.org/fda-visiting-professor-7mar06.ram )

2. Marshall TG,Marshall FE: Sarcoidosis succumbs to antibiotics-implications for autoimmune disease. Autoimmunity Reviews,2004;3(4):295-3001.
(Fulltext at http://yarcrip.com/sarcoidosissuccumbs-preprint.htm )

3. Marshall TG,Fenter B,Marshall FE: Antibacterial Therapy Induces Remission in Sarcoidosis. Herald MKDTS 2004g;Volume.III:Release.1(The Journal of the Interregional Clinical-Diagnostic Center, Kazan, in Russian translation).ISSN:1726-6149.
(English version at http://www.joimr.org/phorum/read.php?f=2&i=107&t=107 )

(many thanks go to Belinda, for helping me draft this abstract)

Last edited on Sun Apr 30th, 2006 17:24 by Prof Trevor Marshall

John McDonald
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It is a very well and concisely written abstract.  I look forward to the full paper. 

"remember that "innate immunity" is the 'last line' of defence, while "acquired immunity" is the first line..."

'Remembering innate immunity' took me about an hour  of searching this site and reading the results for "innate immunity".  If the built in search routine works properly then this is the first time, as I suspected, that you have ever said this on this web site.  I really appreciate this type of information so if you have another link I would be very, very grateful.

I recognize that you are targeting medical researchers and gov't decision makers with your most recent papers.  I have found them to be less easy to read as an 'outside-of-this-field' scientist than your earlier papers.  I accept that gladly if it helps you with your target audience, but I'm dissappointed nonetheless to not understand your 'take away' points.  I love the insights that you offer and I hate it when my jargon and biology limitations make it hard to read your work.  I am a frequent presenter in my own field and from that background I also worry that much of what you had to say to the FDA went over their heads as well.  I find that I can't count on my audiences knowing what they are supposed to know, and that if I use to much jargon I lose them.  I hope this isn't the case at the FDA, but based on the Q&A I wonder.  I hope you don't take this as hostile, I am a big, big supporter.

I'm afraid that I still don't understand the break through respecting Olmesartin and the vitamin D receptor.  I plan to watch your FDA presentation again in hopes that I will get it this time, but I think that 1,25D turns the receptor off and somehow supports cytoplasmic digestion of the CWD bacteria, and it seems that 25D docks to the same receptor and somehow turns it on.  My point is that I am terribly confused about the simple idea of how the VDR is supposed to work, and how 25D and 1,25D and Benicar affect it, and hence us.  Can you offer just a few sentences about this?  Also, could you offer a layman's synopsis, just a paragraph, of the take-away points from the FDA presentation.  I would be ever gratefully yours,   :::::::::::john

 

Last edited on Sat Apr 1st, 2006 09:51 by John McDonald

Prof Trevor Marshall
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John,
1,25-D is the only metabolite that turns the VDR on.
Everything else turns it off, or at least modifies its capabilities. So exogenous Vitamin D and 25-D both bind into the VDR and block it from working properly. They will displace any 1,25-D from the receptor in a dose-dependent manner. The higher the concentration of Vitamin-D or 25-D competing with the endogenous 1,25-D the more of that 1,25-D will be displaced from the VDR. That occurs in a manner represented by the displacement graphs in the FDA presentation.

Sorry, I hadn't spoken about innate immunity before the FDA presentation. That became crystal clear to me in the months while I was preparing the FDA presentation, but I didn't talk about it publicly here.

Benicar also stops the over-excitation of the VDR by inactivating it, but it does so in a dose-dependent and controllable manner. We control Benicar's activity against the VDR by varying the Benicar dose. But Benicar also has profound actions elsewhere in the immune system. Some I am already aware of, some I am not. There will be more about this at the upcoming conference, which has not yet been announced (watch this spot...)

I understand that what I said to the FDA mostly went over the heads of the audience. But there is a copy in the FDA library, and I will be giving written submissions on issues before the FDA in the future, and from these I will be able to refer to this presentation. For example, if the FDA held a hearing aimed at increasing the RDA of Vitamin D you can be pretty sure I would be making a submission. This lecture being on file will make my written submission that much more effective:)

Prof Trevor Marshall
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I am pleased to report that the Abstract has been accepted for poster presentation at the 2006 "Days of Molecular Medicine" conference in May, at the Karolinska Institut in Stockholm.

http://www.nature.com/nm/meetings/dmm/index.html

I usually refuse all except oral presentations, but in this case I missed the deadline, and I think this will be an important conference for us to get the message out.

I am interested in what you'all think I should put on the 27 x 39 inch poster board. I am thinking the right-hand one-third should be a list of the Chronic inflammatory diagnoses of folks on the MP, the number who are responding to the MP, and the number of 'recoveries' (if any).

Beyond that, I am interested in what you think TPTB may be interested in finding out. What was the big hang-up your physician had? What was the key thing for him/her to understand?

Last edited on Sat Apr 8th, 2006 08:42 by Prof Trevor Marshall

paulalbert
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Trevor,

If I were a disinterested party evaluating such a poster presentation, here is what I would be interested in....

For each condition that is "on your radar", I would be interested to see which are plausible candidates for the MP, which the MP has achieved some measure of success in treating, and which the MP has cured.

I would be interested to know how many patients have achieved cure versus how many are still in treatment, if possible, broken down by condition.

I would be interested in seeing a scatterplot graph of MP patients' 1,25D levels versus the "normal" range. (This always astounds me.) 

I would be interested to know the numbers of patients who report treatment on the Internet versus the number of patients (that you know of) who are doing the MP offline.

I might also be interested in reading a handful of super pithy, and to the extent possible, objective case histories. 

Of course, this isn't a "billboard presentation."

Nice to return to Stockholm, the site of your eureka moment, eh?

Paul

Last edited on Fri Apr 7th, 2006 13:51 by paulalbert

Rosie
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My rheumy (fibro specialist) was okay about drawing the D tests and about me stopping vitamin D supplementation.  His hangup: "there is no proof that bacteria causes FM" or that FM is an autoimmune disease, just related. Also, while both my rheumy and endocrinologist fully accept that autoimmunity runs in families and that an individual can develop several of them, they did not seem to grasp the fact that many symptoms are shared among folks with very different autoimmune diseases.

Rosie

Last edited on Fri Apr 7th, 2006 20:19 by Rosie

RobertTownsend
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Trevor
I would highlight at least some of the following - to the extent they can be incorporated into your more focused research :

1 Unified parameters of inflammatory /AI conditions - ACE, cytokine profiles , TNF appha etc

2 Similar clinical framework for many AI conditions - extreme variance in disease progression , remission periods etc

3 Wide range of AI conditions with substantial clinical support for, or at least inference of, bacterial pathogenesis ( RA ( from Brown to ODell) Sarco ( the original work to yours) Crohns ( perhaps Tom Barody's latest work)

4 Why bacterial identification of CWD infection is extra-ordinarily difficult

5 And, of course, your latest work on manipulating the VDR

6 The consolidated observations from your Phase 2 clinical trials ( without corrupting them by drawing out inferences which are too premature)

Good luck

Robert Townsend

jrfoutin
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Faces do make a difference. Suggest a banner of some MP patients along the top border of your poster, maybe short quotes by patients. 

Of those that signed release forms and are available for this event, some included quotes in the email, others have quotes on the success thread. 

Also, flag icons representing the international nature of your work.

Reenie
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What was the big hang-up your physician had?

My GP's hang-up is that I don't have sarc and he doesn't "get" how my illness would be connected to or why a treatment for sarc would work for me.  My GP sees one illness, one treatment. (He still has this hang-up)   

What was the key thing for him/her to understand?

I think understanding how do you know that I have a bacterial infection when a routine workup doesn't show that I have one and how do you know that's what is making me ill.  My GP also doesn't see that all of my symptoms are related to the same cause.  

BTW, my GP is still waiting for the "eureka" moment when "someone" finds the cause and cure for CFIDS. 

Oh and that I'm taking antibiotics for a long time and he's afraid I won't have "anything to take" if/when I get some sort of infection that he would routinely treat with a round of abx. 

The other question that keeps coming up is, "How do you know what you're experiencing, via herx, is making you better rather than just your illness flaring?"  That's prob just going to take some time as more and more of us get well and don't have the usual set backs and relapses.  :cool: 

Last edited on Sat Apr 8th, 2006 00:21 by Reenie

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I agree with Janet - people's faces and brief comments across the top.  I know you want to be as scientific as possible, but 27x39 isn't very big, and there's a limit to the amount a person can take in standing reading a poster.  You have to balance just enough science to get them wanting more, with enough popular appeal to attract them to read in the first place.  Too much popular appeal and you look like a snake oil peddler; too much science and it isn't a 'good read'.

I think the problem for my physicians was the high, untested dosage of olmesartan.

Julia 

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Reenie,
One of the things we have planned carefully is to leave available to your Doc a key antibiotic from each class of 'macrolide' and 'tetracycline' which he/she can use for emergency infections. The macrolide is Ketek, the tetracyline is Tigecycline. Both are new, 3rd generation antibiotics with wide spectrum which Doc will be happy to use in an emergency. The MP exposes you to neither, so that if any resistance builds, both classes of abx are still available to Doc. You can point this out to him/her on your next visit.

Of course, as I have said so many times, bacteriostatics are unlikely to promote resistant species, as all species, even resistant ones, succumb to them when given for long enough periods. For example, minocycline, very widely over-prescribed for teenage acne, was released in 1968. In nearly 40 years there have been no significant species which have built resistance to it. There is one known major resistant SNP, but those microbes are still susceptible, just less so.

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If we are still experiencing herxes at the antibiotic combos we are each using, doesn't that illustrate in itself that our bacteria has not grown resistant to at least those drug combos??

I would also add that only one of the antibiotics prescribed on the protocol has ever been prescribed to me in the past, for what it's worth.

Fred

Last edited on Sat Apr 8th, 2006 07:17 by zackone

dougs
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I would divide the poster into four quadrants.  In each quadrant I would seek to answer a question:

1.  What is the cause of chronic illness?

2.  What is the mechanism the bacteria use?

3.  What disease conditions result?  What is the impact on society?

4.  How do we fix it and what are the results?

I would have a portable DVD player which continuously played video of the bugs taken from patients with as many illnesses as possible; produced by as many different researchers as possible.  If this could be integrated into the poster so much the better.  But a small hand held device would suffice.  Nothing is more powerful than seeing the bugs.

I would prepare four presentations (30-45min each) fleshing out the simple material shown in 1-4 above.  These I would hand out as dvd's.  I would also make these presentations available for download on this web site.

Everything must be simple designed to appeal to primary care physicians and sick patients. 

dougs

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My doctor's biggest hang-up is the concept that sunlight = daylight, however high a latitude one lives at. I don't know if that is too much detail for a small poster presentation, but I think Northern Europeans (presumably there'll be plenty in Stockholm :) ) often have trouble believing that patients can have too much Vitamin D with long winters and short days. Emphasising that the bacteria can produce Vitamin D themselves and therefore the protocol is globally relevant may be useful.

From a more personal perspective, I reckon that emphasising the MULTI-bacterial nature of the illnesses would be handy. Speaking from a CFS perspective, I know that research to find an infective cause has always concentrated on an individual pathogen as ‘the’ cause. And of course, a percentage of patients test positive each time, but never enough to be significant.

BTW, the ‘et’ on the end of Karonlinska Institutet is the Swedish way of saying ‘the’, so you can either drop the English ‘the’ or the final ‘et’. Just a tip for if you’re speaking to Swedes:)

Best wishes and good luck with the presentation,

Barb

Last edited on Sat Apr 8th, 2006 08:35 by barbski

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Fred,
One can generate herx from killing just one or two species. I prefer an multi-species-kill, and that is why I try and get folks to Phase 2 as soon as practicable.

Dougs,
I have a spare laptop, which is an identical copy of my primary machine (I rely totally on this machine, its 100 Gig hard drive contains hundreds of papers, all of Andy Wright's videos, and a stack of other stuff which allows me to basically do anything, anywhere). Liz and I were looking at ways of fastening this to the poster just last night. It is about 11 inches square, but I agree, the space would be well-used. I was going to edit Andy Wright's bacteria videos and have them running on loop so folks could just stand and watch...

paulalbert
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Barbski says:My doctor's biggest hang-up is the concept that sunlight = daylight, however high a latitude one lives at. I don't know if that is too much detail for a small poster presentation, but I think Northern Europeans (presumably there'll be plenty in Stockholm :) ) often have trouble believing that patients can have too much Vitamin D with long winters and short days.
Barb,

Does your doctor have any thoughts on why so many patients with Th1 illness have such high values of D? Surely that would suggest that a Th1 patient requires very little light to catalyze production of it.

I agree with you, Barb. That regular exposure to light is absolutely necessary for everyone is one of those fundamental assumptions of which MD's will have a hard time letting go.

Paul

barbski
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Paul,

Good question but... not all of my doctor's patients get their Ds tested, as it can be awkward and expensive in some parts of the UK. And the main lab here insists the blood doesn't need freezing, so many who do test don't bother to get the blood frozen. (I insisted on getting mine frozen, but I'm stubborn). So he doesn't see a proper range of results from UK patients, unfortunately. The same may be true for other UK and even other European docs using the MP.

Barb

Last edited on Sat Apr 8th, 2006 09:10 by barbski

scooker48
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Dr. Marshall,

It has been my experience that Poster Sessions are not mentioned or ultimately indexed in the Conference Proceedings, which ultimately work their way into the scientific bibliographic databases such as MedLine, BIOSIS, or Chemical Abstracts.

Possible to start communicating with whoever is putting on the Conference about the published conference proceedings?  And that you request some way that your info be included in the Final Published Conference Proceedings?  That way, down the road, the MP will have more visability and therefore credabillity.

The abstract is great.

Sherry

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Sherry,
Those abstracts which are not published can be expanded into full papers for another journal or conference. I am not aware than any abstract will be published from this conference. I am more interested in the potential for interaction with the delegates. There are some important folks who will be there.

Reenie
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One of the things we have planned carefully is to leave available to your Doc a key antibiotic from each class of 'macrolide' and 'tetracycline' which he/she can use for emergency infections.

Trevor,

In my previous post, I never implied that I didn't get this nor that you haven't carefully strategized the MP abx to take precaution from any possible resistance, but I think it's important to somehow address this concern as to using an extended abx therapy strategy for treatment since the clinicians don't "get it." :cool:

Heck, most of them don't even get that we have a bacterial infection, which brings me back to my previous "hang-up" posted about how/why would I want to use the MP to treat my illness.  It's a vicious cycle I suppose. (GP's hang-up, not mine, btw)   

PS I know the info is on the site, but when you want to peak (or pique) interest, I think knowing the objections before they are asked is always helpful especially since oftentimes people don't ask/say them, (their objections) they only think them.

Last edited on Sat Apr 8th, 2006 14:11 by Reenie

Prof Trevor Marshall
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True, Reenie,
I was just wanting to make sure that point was absolutely clear to everybody here:)

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Dr Trevor Marshall wrote: One can generate herx from killing just one or two species. I prefer an multi-species-kill, and that is why I try and get folks to Phase 2 as soon as practicable.

Would you apply this same reasoning to moving through Phase 2 and into Phase 3?

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Yes, I would prefer a lower dose of three abx than a higher dose of two.

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Trevor, that's good news. Keep getting the good word out!

I guess the biggest hang-up my regular physicians had (which led me to find someone who'd do the MP) is the Benicar (more than once a day) issue. I had convinced my Rheumy that the abx in their perscribed doses was ok....he just wouldn't go along with the benicar. I think WHEN the benicar becomes approved as an orphan drug, there will be a lot more doctors willing to use the MP as method for treating patients.

However, that's only my experience.

Robert

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Yes, my MD's biggest worry seemed to be the use of a blood pressure medication for anything else; that my BP would become a problem.  He checks it at every visit and seems pleasantly surprised to find it stabilised and not causing any illness of its own (only annoying side-effects like lightheadedness and sleepiness.)

I think doctors are quite harried and dependent on drug company reps to tell them what a drug is good for, so why not take this opportunity to educate them in the alternative uses/functions of both the ARB and the antibiotics?

It's a matter of semantics.  If you sound like you are apologising for using a drug in an unconventional manner, merely playing around with some side-effect of it's use, that sounds too experimental. You need to word your presentation in an authoritative way, (on a poster or anywhere Doctors read it,) so that they perceive they are hearing about an alternative medical use; hence, the new Protocol using an established medication.

Personally, as a professional wordsmith, I suspect that your battle with the medical establishment is often based on emotive argument, as opposed to being based on unbiased examination of the science, if you catch my meaning. (How often do phrases like 'snake-oil' and 'witch-doctoring' enter the conversation?)  It's all in how you market yourself.  If this was a marketplace (which it is) and you were trying to sell your protocol (which I suppose you are) you'd be looking at who your market is and what they want. I can't think of a better reason for an average Physician to use a new protocol than the fact that it will do the best job of curing their patients. I've said to my doctor, "I'm your guinea pig; when you have cured me, you may then feel confident to use it on many more patients.  You will be a local hero." (Not that he has a big ego about it, but other doctors may respond to this.)

Last edited on Tue Apr 11th, 2006 03:43 by Claudia

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Hi Trevor and other folks! here is my two cents.

I am an electrical engineer and believe strongly in the KISS principle: "Keep it simple, stupid" (Not referring to anyone here but maybe some of the viewers of your poster). People will only have a few seconds to take in your message so it needs to be short, sweet, and to the point.

Maybe: "What is Sarcoidoidosis?" or better yet "What is TH1 disease?"

then a short blurb and then a large picture,

then "What we are doing to treat it"

and a short blurb with a tag line at the end:

For more info contact: your info, Then the MP site address.

And a few more pictures at the bottom of different aspects: the scatter plot of Vit D, Your Picture, a patient or two, and some of the pics from your papers.

The Lap top idea is great, but it would be stolen.

That would be it. uncluttered and succinct. :D

Treavor, as far as  my Dr(s) reluctance/ lack of comprehension:

My Pulminologist rejected the Idea outright. He said " You don't have vitamin D toxicity" and wouldn't even read the material. the "I'm the Dr, I know everything, your just a patient (lab animal), and know nothing" "I give you pain and discomfort in exchange for your money and dignity, now get out of my office and take that nonsense with you!" attitudes.

My MD read the material and felt it had some interesting points and Ideas, but felt that "she was uncomfortable trying a new protocol without more knowledge" and had the hardest time with the meds and dosage.

My MP Dr. was not hesitant but did want the dreaded Blood test (gives me the heebie geebies just typing it) to verify my condition even though I had been diagnosed years earlier. This is good (I can't believe I said that!) because it gives a baseline to measure against. He also has a bit of hesitancy with the meds dosage and frequesncy. An interesting note is that his wife also has Sarcoid and was thinking about putting her on the MP.

Good luck!

Let us know how it turns out!

jackie carpenter
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Hi Dr Marshall

I am a patient on Phase 1 of the MP, currently on 75mg mino. I am in the UK.

My GP and consultant both had big problems that the MP hasn't been peer reviewed. They were advised by their professional bodies not to prescribe the meds to me in case anything went wrong and I sued them. I am lucky that the consultant trusts me personally (after 1 year of seeing her) and respects my attitude to my health. She is therefore happy to authorise the GP to prescribe the meds. But, in the UK, the max recommended dose of olmesartan is 40mg per day, and despite reading your info on the safety of the higher dose, and the tail off of the hypertensive effect, they only prescribe it to me at that level. I take it at the level 120mg pd, and am considering taking it up to 160mg pd. I have to make my own arrangements to get extra supplies, but the GP and consultant cannot 'officially' know how I do it.

So, the two major issues were peer review, and dosage level.

I am sad because I know I only got the go ahead for the MP because I am, like the consultant, educated and articulate; and I found a sympathetic consultant. It wasn't easy. And others might well find it impossible.

Hope this helps

Jackie Carpenter

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Jackie,
Peer review is the process by which a scientific paper is sent to one's "peers" for their comments before publication.

Our work has been peer-reviewed extensively, and been gone-over with a fine-tooth-comb. I have no idea what you mean when you say that our work has not been peer-reviewed.

Our JOIMR papers, for example, even use open peer review, where the reviewers even shed their anonymity to ensure the integrity of their reviews - take a look at the peer-reviews at the bottom of this paper:
http://www.joimr.org/phorum/read.php?f=2&i=38&t=38

Additionally, all our conference abstracts and journal publications have been peer-reviewed. Here is a list of some of the work I have published over the course of nearly 25 years
http://www.trevormarshall.com/papers.htm

I have recently been cleared by a CME (Continuing Medical Education) committee as being competent to participate in providing CME training for physicians. So I have no idea where you, or your consultant, got the idea that our work was not peer reviewed. Nothing could be further from the truth:)

Claudia
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What "they" (doctors) mean when they say it hasn't been peer reviewed, is: they don't yet know it has been peer reviewed.  Doctors think like that. What they don't yet know, doesn't yet exist. Furthermore, when they DO discover that something exists, they don't like to acknowledge that anyone outside of their profession (non-MDs like Trevor) might have thought of it first. Doctors egos are like that.

The trick is to get over caring how they think and let them think that they thought of it first, so we can just HAVE the jolly stuff and get on with it. Anyway, that's how I think. ;)

I suspect that publicity in medical journals commnly read by our MDs is one of the best ways for them to find out about it; the other best way is for drug company reps to tell them. :? 

Since we are not drug reps, i think the next best thing to do is print out those links Trevor points us to and take them in to our doctors' offices.  I will bet that MOST currently practicing doctors (like mine, bless him) are not of the DotCom generation and therefore Not Computer Literate - too busy being doctors! - and they've missed reading those particular articles quoted... So we need to follow those links for them and give it to them on "dead trees" (paper). 

Copies of the actual glossy journal article would be even better, if there was a stack of them available...

:D Claudia

bookdad
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Great idea Claudia! I wonder where one could secure the "goods" -glossy paper originals or reprints? Then we could post that info for those who approaching their Dr. about the MP.

The other problem is that the Dr. is really busy (like we all said) so getting them to read it is another story (punn intended). Maybe leaving it in the restroom (or loo) or sneaking it onto his clipboard? :D

My (X)Pulminologist is going to be eating alot of crow when he finally reads/ hears/ figures it out. :P

Blueberry1
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Joined: Mon Dec 12th, 2005
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Dear Trevor Marshall

Hope you get this, I am aged 51, unable to get on your protocol in UK, have had many illnesses, main problem seems to be holding on to a thought, names especially, My illnesses are I think unique and I believe I should be thoroughly examined for the benefit of mankind, not much hope for me. Some of the illnesses I have had include (Forgot, when born my mothers water was infected), Measles at a few months old and light sensitive, sleep walker age 6, chickenpox age 7, (note in early years had white powder soaked through shirt, took Calcium supplement for 1 year as chap up road died of bones turning to powder), Mumps aged 10, note was early in puberty age 10/11, age 10 tinnitus right ear & persistent coughing now believe this was Tuberculosis, had trouble blowing balloons up and running although Father was ex Army and very fit, although over 5ft 10inches, have short arms and legs, Age 15 diagnosed with a condition which I will not name here, GP then disappeared. Age 17 Glandular fever, or they told me at the time it was a condition from Milk, and would not specify, was too ill to go to hospital, parents would change mattress every 2 hours as it was soaked through with sweat, unable to go back to Sunday Football League, suffered from fatigue (suspect ME) and had protein in urine, specialist insisted i was taking analgesics, i was not. then went on diagnosed with Chronic Sarcoidosis in 1978, 1981 had shingles, 1991 had flue like symptoms for 6 weeks, GP insisted I take Penicillin, I said rather not as mother was very allergic having had 3 years of Penicillin prior to my birth, GP insisted, half way through course I had severe Diarrhea for 3 hours, then later I developed bad teeth and had to have 7 fillings, never had any before, then had memory problems. Early 2004 blood pressure started going through roof and arms and legs jumping, ( keep forgetting things, year 2004 now believe symptoms were MS as went blind in left eye for several hours and other conditions now fit in),real problems started have been very ill since, altered diet, helped, dad died with MRSA at same time suspect I have this as I now have to take, Garlic, Manuka Honey and Silver spray to get by.PS, diagnosed with enlarged left atrium 2004 and P wave form also forgot had blacking out sessions 2000 consider nano bacteria/vit D a major cause of road rage, from personal experience as I am mainly effected in mid afternoon(a high sun year), scan identified abnormal left side brain activity and candidate for seizure. No medical help except antibiotics when had Glandular Fever and second Gp took me off them and went mad with first GP. ALARM Consider condition is moderately contagious and relevant conditions other than recipients to include if I am particularly ill at the time, also if living or working in close prolonged conditions, conditions people tend to get involve Cancer and fatality can occur within 1 Year. I may have reduced the biase towards contagion by being aware of condition and targeting my general health, also conditions I have endured so far seem to have been overcome by will power and even stopped without me yet being able to overcome the underlying condition... Contact me lets save the world. (I may be able to put this problem and your info to Government as I am trying my best to get help, unfortunately it seems to me that many people are ill with underlying bacterial problems and they cannot see it).

God help us all

From David Connell  

Julia
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Joined: Tue Aug 10th, 2004
Location: Belfast, United Kingdom
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Hi David,

Please don't give up trying for a doctor to prescribe the MP.  Now that it's becoming better known, even over here, your chances are steadily increasing.

  • Have you tried taking your own GP printouts of the MP research papers?
  • Did you try offering to sign a waiver to say you take full responsibility for your treatment, and won't sue if anything goes wrong?
  • Did you offer your doctor my doc's phone number to get reassurance that I'm doing really well on the MP and the high dose of Olmesartan doesn't do any harm?
  • Have you tried the other doctors in the practice?
  • Did you try the Derby contact you were given?
  • Have you tried other practices near you?
You won't be the first one to have to fight for the MP, and fighting isn't easy when you're sick, but we're all here behind you rooting for you. :cool:

Julia 

Blueberry1
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Joined: Mon Dec 12th, 2005
Location: Staffordshire, United Kingdom
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Thanks for your response Julia

But I am very serious about my being the answer to this problem and I am even more serious about everyone being ill, and this is world wide and will probably cause WW3, I can see it so clearly, there is a lot more than I have already said including both Doctors who treated me when I had Glandular Fever both died with Cancer, my Gran who lived with us died with Cancer and my best friend died with Cancer, his brother in Law who I had only seen from a distance was at the Hospital at the same time as me and we were both diagnosed with Sarcoidosis, (Q, does it have a life cycle) it is my belief that over 90% of all illness is down to nano bacteria probably morphed from Leprosy, this is why so many things are going wrong in the world, I mean they cannot even supply Petrol properly now, they cannot run a railway, I know I can see it, I have been ignoring my own thoughts for years, yet when an original thought comes to me, it is always right, example I predicted I would pick the winner for the Grand National, Red Rum the first time, I cashed in my last endowment policy the Friday before 9-11-2001, I even went up to the ladies darts team and asked for the winnings from the raffle, they said get off we have not drawn it, so they did and I won, I have never won these raffles before or since.  I KNOW. I can see that my mind is like a light shining through a fog, but much of my brain is still in the fog, and everyone is in a similar state, and people who snap or argue over nothing are ill. Several years ago I read about a specialist researching Cancer, I think it was at Liverpool University, before he could finish he contracted one of the more severe forms of Cancer he asked his assistant to finish his work, as he concluded Cancer was contagious. (because of my name problem I cannot remember his name). My concerns are that either I am unique and may have caused ALL of your illnesses as I was obviously born with this problem, I know Sarcoidosis has been around for longer than my life, but I believe that originally it was in an organic form and now with antibiotics DDT etc, it is progressing, I am going to put my thoughts to the Government so if I disappear you will know why, as I said there is a lot more to my history, at age 3 I was badly bitten by a Dog, I lost a lot of blood it was all over me, but I still walked back, my mum went mad when she saw me I was holding my left arm, she franticly checked me all over, I had to shout at her to stop and I pointed to my arm as there was only one bite, she cleaned me and bandaged me it took nearly an hour before I saw a Doctor I never even went unconscious, at about 12 my older brother was hit with a brick at the back of his neck, he was pouring with blood we walked a mile back home, it didn't even slow him down, when he walked in the kitchen my mum said Hi I did not know you had a red shirt, My mum in her 40's had a miscarriage and a very bad time in hospital, she lost a great deal of blood and a priest was called and gave her the last rights, she died last year age 72 after going blind in one eye with Glaucoma and her Liver was congested.       About your points, 1-6, 1. yes tried that but as there memories are failing the more they see me, and their minds/morals are dysfunctional?. 2. No have not tried that but think I am way past it as I have already made a complaint through Government about a specialist in Sarcoidosis who would not see me-ongoing. 3.No that is a thought, but bare in mind they do not consider there is anything wrong with me, yet I could not work but am fortunate enough to be able to live off savings for a while. 4. Yes and had my notes one has me down as an hypochondriac, and someone recognized I had a liver problem some years ago, but have now removed it from my records as a mistake, no mistake. 5. Tried Derby she said she was considering pulling out of MP?. 6.No as I have been with this practice all my life and it is obvious that they all speak to each other and cover each others back. Interesting, I used to be in charge of several computer installation teams who put systems in GP Practices across most of the country, I even set up several seminars, and there is far more, PS I would rather be nuts as at least there is a chance of recovery and I would not be able to hurt anyone just by breathing. I do go on a bit, sorry

Thank you for you input Julia, I am due to see my MP next week, and I am due to see a specialist in sleep problems as this is getting worse, but the GP did say even if I am diagnosed as requiring breathing aids I will not get them as there is no money???   Oh by the way did I tell you I can see energy lines in the sunlight and sound waves from the washing machine.

A Thought, There was an author on Richard and Judy last year he was a Canadian named Adam ?   , who had cured his mother of ME Anyone know his name??

From David

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 5002
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Blueberry1,

The effect of light on the Amygdala.

amygdala more info.

Best not to be looking into the sun so much.--Janet



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