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Prof Trevor Marshall
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Yesterday, Liz and I spent the evening with Dr Alan Cantwell, chatting, and bringing each other up-to-date with conference coordination.

Alan showed me a slide of 'the cancer microbe' in heart muscle of a 41yo female Lupus patient who had died following a Heart Attack. He was preparing the slide for his presentation at our conference.

This slide was from his 1984 paper "Variably acid-fast bacteria in a necropsied case of systemic lupus erythematosus with acute myocardial infarction."
http://tinyurl.com/gouxs
a paper that I had not really noticed before,in an obscure hard-copy journal.

I thought everybody would be interested in that slide. I told Alan that just about everyone experiences "heart flutters" at some point or other during the MP, and it is comforting to be able to visualize the bugs which live in cardiac muscle.

But then Alan gave me a preprint of the actual paper, where there are also photos of the microbes in this patient's Kidney, in her Brain, and her Adrenal Gland. Never say that Th1 is not a systemic disease:)

Alan also showed me some old, out-of-print books (in Spanish) showing electron micrographs of a whole range of bacteria, with pictures of both the L-form and rod-form shapes. Amazing stuff. The conference is going to be an eye-opener, especially for the physicians (who tend to dwell on wanting to see photographs and species and 'proof.')

We chewed around the overall 'big picture' with Alan opining that he felt the key species which he thought might 'inter-breed,' and thus lead to chronic Th1 inflammation, might well be Staph, Mycobacteria and Propionibacterium acnes and I noted that all of these had been identified as associated with sarcoidosis. I also mentioned that Borrelia and Rickettsia seem to be endemic at the moment

I was intrigued when he saw a copy of Dr Andy Wright's video which shows the "string of pearls," and immediately identified it as Strep, showing me a very similar photograph in one of his old, long-lost text books. Alan had also frequently seen the long transparent tubules which show up in Andy's microscopy, and I am sure he and John McDonald are going to have some long discussions about microscope technology over the coming months:)

Anyway, it was fascinating to sit down with Alan again, and go over details which we hadn't covered in the past. What an amazing person, with an amazing array of experience, and a mind still razor-sharp.

He will be at the conference Friday evening, Saturday and Sunday, so there will be plenty of opportunity for us all to sit around (in small groups) and chat with him about the details of what we see during his presentations.

Last edited on Sun May 21st, 2006 06:17 by Prof Trevor Marshall

Frans
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Dr Trevor Marshall wrote: I was intrigued when he saw a copy of Dr Andy Wright's video which shows the "string of pearls," and immediately identified it as Strep, showing me a very similar photograph in one of his old, long-lost text books. Alan had also frequently seen the long transparent tubules which show up in Andy's microscopy, and I am sure he and John McDonald are going to have some long discussions about microscope technology over the coming months:)

It would be interesting to bring dr Cantwell in contact with dr Wright I guess?

It would be nice if the DNA-work dr Wright hopes to get from his slides, as he stated on the video, confrims dr Cantwell's findings? That would be mutually beneficial I guess? It would be great if someone starts quoting dr Cantwell's work, since I understand from his book "Four women against cancer" that the way they have suppressed his findings was to not quote them at any time.

Sincerely, Frans

 

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I understand from his book "Four women against cancer" that the way they have suppressed his findings was to not quote them at any time.


I'd be interested to know how many of the 997 Sarcoidosis PubMed-indexed publications since Dr Marshall's incredible findings have made reference to it....any idea? I wouldn't be surprised if this important work which can save so many people is ignored as Dr Cantwell's work was...

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 10:35 by Nikki

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Eurico,
"Google Scholar" is a poor man's citation index, and I note that a search for our Autoimmunity Reviews paper
http://tinyurl.com/nysth

shows 3 external citations
http://tinyurl.com/l7mvh

Interesting that one of our BMJ letters was cited here
http://tinyurl.com/outxf
I had thought they had all slipped into oblivion:)

I do know that there was a Japanese paper which cited Autoimmunity Reviews, Belinda found that one listed in Science Citation Index. It doesn't seem to be in Google Scholar.

But as you say, all in all, it seems that folks are determined to ignore what we have done. However, as in Alan's case, 99.9% of the world is still unable to comprehend the science, and this makes it tough for them to understand its relevance.

Nikki
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If intracellular bacteria are involved in both Th1 disease and cancer, what makes them different? Is it the species of bacteria or is it more complex than this? I hope DVDs are made of the upcoming conference...

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Trevor,

Thanks for sharing.  :cool:

It sounds like you've found another brilliant mind to add to our MP database of knowledge.  I can't wait to meet Dr Cantwell.  He sounds like a real asset for all of us.

In addition to Eurico's question above, why do you suppose some of us get sicker sooner while others seem to go on and on with minimal symptoms into old age? 

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 11:26 by Reenie

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Eurico,
Implicit in your question is the concept that Cancer is somehow "different."

In many ways Cancer results from the inability of the immune system to deal with the mutant cells when they start to form, thus allowing them to proliferate. Which, IMO, is not all that different from the immune system, weakened by Th1 infection, being unable to clear the body of a co-infection, such as babesia or EBV.

Reenie, the course of the disease is mediated by a number of factors. Some bacterial mutants overcome the immune system more completely than others. Some infectious-histories weaken the immune system more effectively.

Additionally, I personally think that unless the brain is involved in the infection, folks seem to get by more easily. It is the mind-fog, psychoses, sleep disturbance and fatigue which tend to be lifestyle-limiting at a point before our physical bodies give out.

We can see an example of infectious-history becoming overwhelming when we look at HIV infection. The HIV virus overwhelms innate immunity, causing almost total shutdown of 1,25-D production (and thus disabling VDR -- or vice versa). Underlying (occult) infection can then take over, and drive the body towards clinical AIDS. Not everybody with HIV goes on to the stage of clinical AIDS. And as the HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) gets rid of the AIDS virus, patients are left to recover to Sarcoidosis, Tuberculosis, Cancers and less severe Th1-related disease. A number of studies have shown that "Quality of Life" is not restored by HAART. There are other factors in play. And this is what Alan and I will be exploring at the upcoming conference. The importance of sequential past infections, of what I call 'infectious-history'.

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While this is very fascinating, it is also scary. I have had those "heart flutters". Not only that, six years ago, my father died of colon cancer. Maybe killing the bacteria will lessen any chance of me developing cancer. I'm looking forward to this discussion.

LeAnne

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 12:13 by LeAnne

Bella
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Amazing stuff. I see so much in the nursing world that smells of TH1 illness...that I wish I could just shout the MP from the mountain tops...(I do when I can):)... It saddens me to see all that I do and only palliative measures taken...breaks my heart....I can't wait for the day that the medical community wakes up and smells the coffee. The science makes perfect sense!

You all have fun at the conference. I cant wait to see the DVDs!!

Jeannine

Last edited on Sun Apr 23rd, 2006 13:05 by Bella

Nikki
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Ah, if they aren't that different then, might the MP not work for cancer?

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Eurico, I have no idea. Nor do I have any idea how one could test that hypothesis

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A case of renal sarcoidosis with complement activation via the lectin pathway



There might be others,but this is the only paper I found in Science Citation Index which lists Marshall, T G, 2004 in its bibliography.

Dr. Marshall, I note you are a prolific writer. Time is on our side.

Sherry

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Sherry,
Yes, that was the one Belinda had found

But I am really not a prolific writer. Some academics write an average of one article every 2 weeks. I figure that there is a better balance achievable in the use of my time:):)

Thanks for your help:

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jeanninehope wrote:
Amazing stuff. I see so much in the nursing world that smells of TH1 illness...that I wish I could just shout the MP from the mountain tops...(I do when I can):)... It saddens me to see all that I do and only palliative measures taken...breaks my heart....I can't wait for the day that the medical community wakes up and smells the coffee. The science makes perfect sense!

Jeannine

What saddens me is offering the MP to my patients and being declined. They are not interested in changing their lifestyles to get well. Perhaps I am not explaining it well enough...:(

SteveF

Memoking
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I have the same question. .. would the MP work for someone who already has cancer? Specifically, if someone has lung cancer? This particular person that I am talking about is taking Chemotherapy and has been diagnosed with Lung Cancer since last November or December....She is the minister's wife....

I do not think that she would consider the MP, but I am wondering if it would work for someone who has already been diagnosed with Cancer and has been taking Chemo and Radiation... ?

 

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Perhaps I am not explaining it well enough...

Steve,

Maybe you're explaining it "all too well."  I mean, when my family sees how I'm going along, I would think they would jump at the chance to be a part of the MP community too, but, I think they are just too afraid to change or trust anything but conventional medicine although it's failing them miserably.  So sad... :(

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Does anyone here know anything about Marfan Syndrome? Would that also be caused by Th1 Inflammation? According to what I have read, Marfan Syndrome is inherited,, and you are born with it.

 If anyone has any information, please tell me.. Thanks.

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Hi Madwolf,

I am glad you are offering the MP to your patients!:dude: You can lead a horse to water but you can NOT make him drink!!!!! At least, you have the knowledge to make the offer. I hope we can get more health professionals to do this. I think the word of the MP will spread as people get well and the end result is seen more and more....

I hope soon we can have some data to be able to put in front of those non-believer or nah sayers! We just love numbers LOL:shock:

Keep the great work up!

Maybe you could share in general how your patients or yourself are doing on the MP to encourage others?!?

Jeannine Jalanivich RN

Last edited on Tue Apr 25th, 2006 13:44 by Bella

jrfoutin
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MadWolf: "...changing their lifestyles to get well..."
I am still working that angle even though I am on the MP. It is hard to change my lifestyle for a period of time. Maybe some people are better at knowing their boundaries at the outset and that they will never change. Mine seem so flexible by comparison.

My husband jokes we are doing "Halloween" all year round. Our parents don't come to visit so often now, as the dark house is a bit upsetting to them. It is a challenge for those that live here too (even the cats display their disgust by opening blinds and crawling behind curtains so they can watch kitty TV during the day hours).

I was even thinking maybe of wearing a wet-suit of thick rubber from head to toe, then throw a wig on it and sunglasses around the house. That might help family feel like they don't have to do cave life too, but given what I can see in their symptom set, lack of light is probably is a good thing for them right now too.

Oh well & getting well, I guess.--JRF 

Last edited on Tue Apr 25th, 2006 15:09 by jrfoutin

Frans
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Memoking wrote: I have the same question. .. would the MP work for someone who already has cancer?
I don't think it is wise for dr Marshall to answer this at this point in time, but we could try google to find if someone, somewhere, is having positive experiences/results in treating cancer with antibiotics.

Sincerely, Frans

Last edited on Wed Apr 26th, 2006 04:12 by Frans

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Frans (and all),
I really have no data on cancer, nor am I trying to collect any. This is Alan's area of expertise. I would suggest starting with a careful reading of his recent papers, such as
"Acid-Fast Bacteria In-Vivo in Prostate Cancer and the Connection between Prostate Cancer, Other Cancers, and the Kaposi’s Sarcoma Virus"
http://www.joimr.org/phorum/read.php?f=2&i=57&t=57

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One of the most important reasons I am coming to this conference is not just for me. My family is plagued with cancer. Mother in law is gone and the hole in my father in law's heart is still an open and gaping wound (not to mention what it did to her kids and grandkids to lose her in their life). My sister was recently told by her oncologist that she was terminal. (She'll be coming with the conference with me.) My daughter just was informed that she has a very rare form of a pretty rare cancer, and she is in a very rare subset of that group--oh doctors they bandy about the word "treatable" but they will admit it is not "curable" based on their definition and understanding at this time. She is finishing up radiation this week and continues with chemo and prednisone because she felt that was her duty to other family members and her understanding of the ball game.

But I ramble. Most of us see autoimmunity running like wild through our family tree now we know what it looks like. Our ailment is just one very pronounced indicator.

So I do want to hear what Dr Marshall has to say. I do want to hear what Dr Cantwell has to say. I've read the 4 Women against Cancer book. I've read his papers. He's got my attention.

Thank you Dr. Marshall and ARF for the great thinking behind this conference!--Janet

Last edited on Wed Apr 26th, 2006 10:11 by jrfoutin

Memoking
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Thank you, Dr. Marshall, I read the link as you suggested, It was very informative.. It talks about a cancer microbe, and bacteria, I think it is very important that Dr. Cantwell is going to be talking about Cancer at the LAX Conference..I too have lost family members to cancer. My uncle had Colon Cancer, and he died when he was 42. My mother died of Uterine Cancer at the age of 78, although she could have lived a lot longer than that if she had not had cancer, because she was young at heart, and in good physical condition otherwise...Since being on the MP, I have wondered if my mother had Th1 Inflammation, because her eyes would water a lot...also , she was fair-skinned and had red hair. I don't think she had Sarcoidosis, but I have wondered about it. And being born and raised in the South, she was out in the sun a lot..

I guess my main question is, can Sarcoidosis progress to Cancer? That's what is on my mind..

Anyway, thank you for your wonderful research, and for the research that Dr. Cantwell is going also. I know the Conference in LAX would be valuable for all these reasons, and it is going to cover so much and so many diseases.

Thanks again.. (Memoking)......Mary

 

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Mary,
I think that Alan is saying that inflammation, in the presence of persistent bacteria, is associated with Cancer. The whole aim of the MP is to reduce the level of Th1 inflammation, with Benicar, and by killing the bacteria which cause the inflammation. It is too early to judge whether the MP has any effect on cancer prognosis, as there have only been 200, or so, patients who have been on the MP for long enough for any such benefit to show up. There have been no reports of any of the folks on the MP developing Lymphoma, or any other aggressive tumor.

Last edited on Wed Apr 26th, 2006 16:17 by Prof Trevor Marshall

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HI ALL

This is Fred in WV.  On the cure for cancer, has any one read about AVASTIN?? Back in Sept 2005 I saw part of a TV show on PBS and the professor was giving a lesson to doctors about the blood supply to the cancer.  He said that in Boston they found out that the cancer tumors received their blood supply form angiotensin and if you blocked it the cancer tumor dried up.

The Avastin is an angiogenesis inhibitor and they have had sucess with the colon cancer and are now tring it on breast and lung cancers.  You have to be in stage 4 and no hope for you in order to get this drug.  I have read of one person that is still cancer free after 2 year, she had colon cancer.  The TODAY SHOW had a story on the drug a few weeks ago.

Now with us taking the benicar, would this be a preventive for cancer??  Somethig to think about.  Maybe Dr Marsahll can tell about this new drug or maybe we should ask Dr Cantwell.

Remember, we are all in this together and I am pulling for us.

Your friend in saroidosis

Freddie

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Thank you Freddie for sharing this information. OMG, this is so interesting. I can't wait to have these discussions with Dr. Cantwell.;) I have a friend that goes to my church, who is an Oncologist. I'm wondering now, if I should invite her to this conference.

 Just the fact that the public is talking about this is exciting, but so is the MP. and the paper Dr. Marshall wrote about angiotensin and the immune system. Why is it that their discoveries get told and publicized and Dr. Marshall's doesn't?

LeAnne 

DianeC
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This thread regarding Cancer is very interesting to me as well as I lost my Father in 1999 to colon cancer, my uncle in 1996 and my husband was diagnosed with colon cancer is 1996 and as far as we know my husband still remains cancer free but how can one know for sure?:?  

He goes for his colonoscopy every 2 years.  His surgery had been performed in NYC by a doctor who shared his office with the doctor who invented the colonoscope so we felt we could not be in a better place at that time:D

I have often wondered if there is a diagnostic test or procedure such as a Pet Scan or blood test (other than cea) which would indicate cancer anywhere in the body??  And is it a safe procedure?  My husband also lost his mother when she was in her 30's due to tuberculosis. 

My husband also received 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy. I am going to try to contact his oncologist and to tell him about the conference:) Hopefully I will be successful:) 

Does anyone have any suggestions as to the best way to introduce this to his oncologist? as I will probably only have a few moments on the phone and want to be the most effective that I can in convincing him that he needs to go to this conference!   Something like in 20 words or less??  

I believe that when people have or have had cancer but are not bothered by inflammatory symptoms and basically feel fine (palliative), it is much harder to convince them that they need treatment for a bacteria that they can't even conceive could be undermining their health and longevity:(  

It gives me great hope as I read this thread about the future:D

DianeC  

Last edited on Fri Apr 28th, 2006 01:50 by DianeC

GeorgeinRollaMO
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Hi, All,

While I posted my information in a separate thread, I see that the information is pertinent on this thread.  If you have not done so already, you might check out http://www.marshallprotocol.com/forum11/6152.html

I got onto the AMAS test through two friends who saved their prostates by doing and believing its results.  They had gotten a too high PSA test result and their med docs wanted to cut out their prostates.  Luckily, they were ornery old retired Captains, too, and use to not being bowled over by some puffed up "expert", and said that they wanted more information.  They did the AMAS and it indicated that all was OK.  They waited.  Their PSA went down.  They and their wives were happy!

DianeC, I think that this is the closest test that we have today to what you asked for.  It is touted to be be able to detect cancer at least one to nineteen months ahead of other tests, and find it no matter where the cancer is.  But if you have cancer, then you have to use other procedures/tests to find it...if that is what you need to know.

As you can read, I had a test report that was "elevated".  I decided to wait and see what the MP might do.  My next/last test result came back OK. :) I believe that the MP is the answer, not radiation and chemo of regular medicine!!!!  Time will tell.  I think that that high test result was in actuality showing that my immune system is being turned on.

Wellness to all!!!!!!!!!!!

Dark Vader (aka, George)


 

Prof Trevor Marshall
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Further to what George is saying, here is a recent editorial which highlights the 'insensitivity' (medical jargon for 'not much use') of the PSA test, which is relied upon so widely by physicians in the USA.
http://tinyurl.com/mw65h

jrfoutin
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DianeC,
I recommend you Print and fax the information to the doctor, or print it out and take it to his office.

Calling the office will give you the fax number and you can alert them that it is coming.

After the fax goes through, call again and make sure the office staff sees the fax and that it didn't have any errors. At that time, request that it be placed on the doctor's desk or box and ask when he usually picks those kind of things up.

Tell them you would like to call him and talk to him about it, and ask when the best time would be.

The office staff usually knows these details and can help you get a call through and a note seen. A printout of details will give him the opportunity to review the content and to pass it along to peers.

Thanks for the reminder to invite doctors, I'll do this with my doctor too, even though he isn't an oncologist.

DianeC
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Thank you George and Dr. Marshall for replying to my post!:D Well now I am so glad that I posted in this thread:D This issue has weighed very heavily on me for the last few years because in alot of instances they say that "cancer returns":( 

Then some will say that the longer you go cancer free the better prognosis but I am not so sure that I believe that:?

I do remember after Tom finished the chemotherapy in early 1997 we sought care with these 2 doctors who were brothers and were basically offering the "fountain of youth" and did alternative medicine.  We got turned off, not only because insurance would not pay a cent (we gladly paid for the visit which was very expensive) but then when during the appt we asked a pertinent question and he would not answer and stated that we would find the answer in his newly published book!:X and we could purchase it right then:X

This same doctor wanted to do vitamin C infusions and a laundry list of things amounting to big $$$$$  I do vaguely remember now that you have brought my attention to this:D, that there was a cancer test and it could be the AMAS test but the problem was we would have had to go to another state (I believe it was CT to have it performed)  We probably did not pursue the matter anymore because of our distrust of this doctor and his methods of practice:(:(  

So thank you, George, more than you know:Das we will travel anywhere where I can be assured that Tom will be able to have this test.  I will first check with our regular doctor here and see if she can order the test:D

Actually back in 2001 at the time when I was being prescribed the doxy for my uveitis (200mg per day) Tom also had an inflammatory eye condition that was locally misdiagnosed as glaucoma:(  They had him taking 3 different eye prescriptions and his eyes were always red (they had made a mistake and he should not have been taking all 3):X  Recently he was prescribed lumigan for glaucoma but I am still not convinced that he has glaucoma and that the lumigan is just suppressing the inflammation???:?  Our current ophthalmologist trained under Dr. Wirostko but he does not share all of Dr. W beliefs regarding  mycoplasma mollucites. 

He also had been prescribed doxy 100mg per day and took it for 3 years and it did resolve the inflammation.  The only problem is that Dr Wirostko had passed away and after 3 years of doxy we both got nervous staying on it and I was starting to have a lot of problems with my stomach and brain fog due to the doxy. 

It was really miraculous as Tom was also just about to go for gum surgery but after just a short time on the doxy his gums look great and have remained so:)

My feeling is that the doxy has helped him tremendously with the inflammation but he has not taken doxy in over 2 years now so it is a concern.  So he did have inflammation but it remains more internal and does not manifest itself with pain like it does in my case. I have not had any inflammatory pain that appeared mostly in my legs since I have been on MP!:D:D 

Thank you Dr. Marshall for the prostate cancer test link:D:D I have already printed it out:D     

By the way, George, my parents had lived in the Ozarks during their retirement and my father used to go to Springfield. MO for his doctor, hospital care.  Are you located in the vicinity of Springfield? 

Thanks again to you both for the heads up.....I will be checking this out for sure!:D:D

DianeC

Last edited on Fri Apr 28th, 2006 13:50 by DianeC

Prof Trevor Marshall
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DianeC,
If you print out a copy of this Reuters news service article
"Positive CT scan for lung cancer may resolve"
http://tinyurl.com/h2h86
and give it to Doc, you might find that he/she is prepared to continue your husband on antibiotics.
(you might also print out the actual abstract at:
http://www.chestjournal.org/cgi/content/abstract/129/4/1039 )

The article is fascinating in that it again points out that the only certain way to know if cancer is present is to allow the passage of time, so that the cellular proliferation can become obvious. Unfortunately, because cancer therapies are ineffective unless started early, few oncologists have been allowing patients to "make sure" that their CT shadows were really cancer before pushing them into chemotherapy. This study shows that a large proportion of Lung cancers might be misdiagnosed.

The researchers note that possible cancer diagnosis in 12 of 41 patients had fully or partially resolved when therapy was delayed 2 months. In another group, 29 of 39 had full or partial resolution.

While this alone ought to be a bombshell, what is intriguing is their concluding statement:
we recommend a course of antibiotics followed by another CT within 2 months to people with patchy consolidation or nonsolid opacities detected on the baseline screening and all those with new nodules on repeat screening. It must be emphasized that the use of antibiotics and short-term CT follow-up is only one of the options in the regimen of CT screening for lung cancer," the researchers add, "and further research in this area promises to continue to improve the efficiency of CT screening for lung cancer.

These researchers are prepared to prescribe antibiotics, just in case, and it is possible your Doc may do so, too. But I would ask Doc for Minocyline, rather than Doxycycline, as Mino is more effective against one of the nasty plasmid-bearing species, Staph. In any case, Doc might well be more familiar with Mino, since he/she is probably prescribing Mino to his/her Acne patients:)

DianeC
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Thank you Dr. Marshall:D

I have printed out all of the links and will present the information to our doctor:D  She is very open to alternative ways (not always mainstream way of doing things) and presents herself as doing medicine in the most holistic way possible so we feel very fortunate in that respect:D She really listens to her patients and is very open minded:) 

I am feeling much more optimistic; taking action, instead of just standing by waiting for something devastating to happen:)  Do you have any idea of the strength of dose of minocycline and how often to take it?  I would think pulsed like we do on MP and not like we did when we were on doxy, every day.  

In one of my posts I had asked if anyone had any suggestions regarding calling doctors, professionals (especially those in the health arena) with just a few magic words that would prompt them to think "Yes I need to go to this conference" :)

Any health professionals on this site and reading this link......what words would make you respond in a positive way??:?

DianeC   

DianeC
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Hi Janet;),

Thank you for the additional tips on expediting the information to the doctor:D I was so sorry to read that much of your family has been plagued with cancer:( 

If only we could figure out just the right words to say to family members, friends, etc who seem to be so skeptical, and change their way of thinking??  We are all not that different......I think we all want optimal health but I think it is all a matter of how serious does one want to really achieve total wellness? And what they are willing to give up in the process which the way I see it one to two years in nothing when we think of all the years we have lived in misery with no hope for the future:(

Time goes very fast and even faster the older we get...good and bad ways to look at that:P  Think of it as an adventure....it has become the highlight of my life and this site is like life support with each day knowing something new will happen and that is exciting:D

Best wishes to all:cool:

DianeC      

DianeC
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Hi again George:),

I am feeling so much better today than I have been after reading all of the posts on this thread:D  I just clicked on the link again that you provided and will print it out.

Wow, you have really done quite extensive research....Russell bodies and all:)  I plan to call the 800 number on Monday to inquire about the AMAS Test.  Do they mail the test to the doctor or person taking the test?  Is there anything else I should know about the test?

After I print out all of the information I will sit down and try to digest it all:D

Thanks again for all of this incredible information!:cool:

DianeC 

jrfoutin
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DianeC,
As for a connection between cancer and Sarcoidosis, I'm not sure I'm the only one that sees it in their family tree (smile). So we come to your next comment:
"If only we could figure out just the right words to say..."
Which is a sophisticated communication event that also relies upon the preparation of the listener.

I think Dr. Cantwell will have a few of those right words (and you know I am coming to hear them). I think the article Dr. Marshall told us about with the CT scans has a few of those right words, too (and his great idea to hand the article to doctors at the same time as the conference information).

And I like the idea of living the right words when saying them isn't going to work (that's what folks on this site have helped me to learn).

Of course, a massive change in medical industry perceptions would take the right words right out of my mouth.

But that takes a lot of us saying the right words, a lot.--JRF

Last edited on Fri Apr 28th, 2006 16:53 by jrfoutin

GeorgeinRollaMO
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DianeC,

I am glad that my posting the information has helped relieved you.  :)  It is an awful burden of knowledge to have to live with.

The protocol kit is sent to you.  It is a foam, insulated box with all you need within.  Part of the Requisition form is for you to fill in and part for your doc or assistant.  Your doc's assistant will ship the two 5 ml processed blood samples back to Oncolab in that box via FedEX Priority Overnight shipping, along with three (3) pounds of dry ice which you will have to locate and pick up before going to the doc's office.   Allow an absolute two hours for processing the blood to be sent, preferably, three hours.  Do not draw blood/send on a Friday.  The lab cost is $165 if you have to pay yourself.  Medicare will pay, at least once per year, as part of a anti-cancer program.  The test is FDA approved.  The lab has done over four thousand test, I think.  It really is easy!!!

Rolla is midway between Springfield and St. Louis, on the old historic Route 66, now I-44... about 105 miles in each direction.  The town was started by the Frisco RR Line, and was a Union stronghold during the Civil War.  I won't tell how nice the area is; I do not want to be inundated with people.  English is still spoken here.  The men love their bib-overalls, and the women are giving up their corn-cob pipes to make the area heathier.  The medical profession is as bad as everywhere else.  They practice "the standard of care" way.   :(

Wellness to all!!!!

Dark Vader (aka, George)

DianeC
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Hi George:),

Yes, thank you for spelling everything out for me:) I had no idea this was even available and FDA approved to boot!:)  You have really made my day!:D

It sounds like paradise where you are living:P and very interesting with a lot of history.

 My parents had stumbled upon the Ozarks in 1982 and made it their retirement home.  They lived in the Mountain Home/Lakeview area very close to the MO border.  I had spent some time there as well early on after they got moved in.  My father did alot of fishing I believe it was at White River if I remember correctly near Bull Shoals??  There was also a restaurant named Gastons and I believe some of the big names spent vacations there fishing, etc. While we were visiting one year we took a trip to Eureka Springs. They just loved it there and from what I hear it is getting popular again but I won't tell too many people:P 

Yes, I totally agree with you as far as the medical care that is lacking all over the country......it is so sad:( 

Well thanks again, George, and continued great health and wellness to you and all of us:D

DianeC  

DianeC
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Hi Janet;),

Yes, you have a good point there.....we could have all the right words but if they fall on deaf ears....well where are we then:(   Yes, showing them with our actions and having them see such a dramatic change may just be the answer....then hopefully they will want it for themselves:) 

Helping to make a difference in someone's life......one person at a time:)

Thanks Janet, for your insight:cool:

DianeC 

   

paulalbert
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I thought I would post the abstract of "The role of mutation in the new cancer paradigm". It is from Cancer Cell International and it seems to support the ideas put forth by Dr. Cantwell:

The almost universal belief that cancer is caused by mutation may gradually be giving way to the belief that cancer begins as a cellular adaptation that involves the local epigenetic silencing of various genes. In my own interpretation of the new epigenetic paradigm, the genes epigenetically suppressed are genes that normally serve in post-embryonic life to suppress and keep suppressed those other genes upon which embryonic development depends. Those other genes, if not silenced or suppressed in the post-embryonic animal, become, I suggest, the oncogenes that are the basis of neoplasia.

Mutations that occur in silenced genes supposedly go unrepaired and are, therefore, postulated to accumulate, but such mutations probably play little or no causative role in neoplasia because they occur in already epigenetically silenced genes. These mutations probably often serve to make the silencing, and therefore the cancer, epigenetically irreversible.

Paul

kenc
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madwolf,

I can only speculate as to why some patients of yours have declined treatment with the MP.

What saddens me is offering the MP to my patients and being declined. They are not interested in changing their lifestyles to get well. Perhaps I am not explaining it well enough...
However, I can tell you why I would turn down a treatment and why I selected the MP.

I've had symptoms of Crohn's for about 26 years.  I've tried many convention treatments. I've been given all of the drugs normally prescribed and I've been on four trials of genetically engineered drugs.  I've tried many alternative treatments - too many to mention here.  My last treatment was with a naturopathic physician. It lasted one year and cost over $5000.  Everything has failed except prednisone.  And even that has become less and less effective over time.

So, I'm very skeptical of ANY treatment. 

What attracted me to the MP was:

1) It appears to be based on good science.  I have a science degree, so I know a little bit about science -  perhaps enough to know when pseudoscience is being used.

2) It fits in with other research I've been reading (ex. studies and theory based on the infection pathogenesis for Crohn's disease and epidemiological studies)

3) My gastroenterologist, who does research at a university here, believes that the tide is turning in Crohn's disease research from the defective immune system pathogenesis to the infection pathogenesis.  The infection pathogenesis was popular when Crohn's disease was first discovered, then died out when a pathogen could not be confirmed.

The only part of the lifestyle change I was concerned about was that which could possibly keep me from working (i.e. the light avoidance).

Ken

LeAnne
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Location: Augusta, Georgia USA
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Here is a very interesting article that I was reading today.

http://www.journal-inflammation.com/content/1/1/3

LeAnne

cfidstobreastcancer
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I started out in '86 with a high fever, and then incredible chronic fatigue for 18 months, and then 7 years of slightly less fatigue, and then seven years of an accommodation to the fatigue which I then took as the normal status quo. However, I couldn't excercize and took many varieties of anti-depressants to deal with what got finally called chronic depression. So, with much belly fat, very poor outlook or enthusiasm to get well, I recently got the worst news: infiltrating lobular breast cancer...Now, serendipidously, I had met a MP participant, just a month before the b.c. diagnosis. I was very interested in trying the protocol. But now I am going to have surgery, radiation (I presume) and probably chemotherapy...and have read a book about nurtition in fighting cancer. It promotes the use of fish oils that are against the MP...so I am not sure how MP can be used in this situation...What does Dr. Cantwell say about all of this? Or Trevor Marshall...

Carole
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Location: Florida USA
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Hello, cfidstobreastcancer, and welcome to the Marshall Protocol website!

I'm so sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis!  There are many links to read, but the one reference of immediate importance for you is this-- CANCER
and Th1 inflammation

I also heard recently where someone had a double mastectomy, but later learned that she had sarcoidosis in her chest wall!  :(  This is your life; so the more knowledge you gain, the more you will be able to make educated decisions about your health.

The "staining" aspect by the pathologist is of the utmost importance, as both Dr. Marshall and Dr. Cantwell have discussed, so I would suggest you share that significant detail from the forum with your physician.  Then both of you may decide together about what your next steps should be.

After studying the science behind the Marshall Protocol, you will deduce that consuming Vitamin D is not in your best interest now or in the future if Th1 inflammation is present.  Please refer to the following:
SARCOIDOSIS  re Overview, treatment, diagnosis, symptoms, remission, PFTs, staging system, ACE, etiology, standard treatments

CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME and Th1 inflammation

Checklist for MP basic links

The Essential Information is in ABOUT THE MARSHALL PROTOCOL and all links alphabetised in the ABC of MP 


Best wishes as you face your current situation!  Please keep us posted, as our thoughts are with you! . . . Carole  

Last edited on Sun Jul 2nd, 2006 13:30 by Carole



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