The Marshall Protocol Study Site Home

 Moderated by: Prof Trevor Marshall  
AuthorPost
Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Our colleague Amy Proal (MP: 'Ames') has put together a wonderful 'blog' at Bacteriality.com

She has just posted an excellent interview with Prof Gerald Domingue, a pioneer whose work was first introduced to me by Alan Cantwell (who showed me a rare book containing Gerry's electron-micrographs of a variety of L-forms).

http://bacteriality.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/domingue/

Amy has written other excellent articles too - go to her blog and look them over. This is a wonderful resource of material for you to show your family, friends, and physicians :)
 

Russ
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Mar 24th, 2006
Location: Hartford, Connecticut USA
Posts: 812
Status:  Offline
I found this paper by Domingue, listed in the sources section of Amy's page, to be especially interesting:

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=172922&blobtype=pdf

Last edited on Fri Aug 24th, 2007 15:21 by Russ

tickbite
inactive member


Joined: Mon Apr 24th, 2006
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
Posts: 399
Status:  Offline
That is a good paper Russ. My sincerest thanks to Amy and company for putting together the bacteriality blog. A successfull endeavor to cohese the almost unlimited supply of references and evidence towards validating the Marshall Protocol model for recovery from chronic disease.

Congratulations and keep it coming,

~Greg

IngeD
Member


Joined: Thu Jan 25th, 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1063
Status:  Offline
Thank you Amy! Well done! Very easy to follow, great site to pass on as an introduction to MP. I have already pasted the link onto our family website. It has been a while since I have swamped them with information so I am hoping this may be of interest :D

Inge.

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thank you Trevor, Tickbite, Russ and Inge for your interest in Bacteriality and your nice comments about the site.  I'm excited to continue putting up new pieces!

I would not be able to put up pieces on Bacteriality without the help of Joyce Waterhouse who reads over my work and makes corrections.

Also, my boyfriend Paul Albert designed the site.  He also writes the coding that allows for pictures.  And he edits my work as well.

Yes, Domingue is an amazing scientist.  It was an honor to get to know him a bit when i was writing the piece on his work.  He has told me that I can call him Jerry!

A research from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences named Nadya Markova made a comment about Domingue on Bacteriality.  Here it is:

“I highly appreciate the great achievements of Gerald Domingue in L-form research. His papers and book are always basic guidance in our experiments with L-forms. They are always citied in our L-form publications. We will be glad to contact him and to consult about interesting findings in this field, especially to know his opinion about “nanobacteria” and human blood L-form isolates.  I fully agree with his opinion about “ethics of scientific writing”.

Dr. Markova has her own site about L-forms.  Here is the URL:

http://nadya.markova.googlepages.com/

Now I'm in contact with Dr. Markova.  I think she will consent to an interview which I can then post at some point on Bacteriality.

I have sent Domingue a "Science" DVD and a DVD of the LAX Conference (provided generously by Trevor) and will do the same for Markova.

Today I just posted a new piece called "Koch's Postulates, Horizontal DNA Transfer, and the Era of the Genome" on Bacteriality.  Take a look!  Coming next...an interview with Ival Myer, an MP patient with RA.

Amy

Last edited on Tue Aug 28th, 2007 11:27 by Ames

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline
Amy,
Her site and links have some interesting rat pictures and historical content from Bulgarian researchers.

The aspect you have built of pulling in a diversity of researchers who have similar perspectives is extraordinarily commendable.

I hope you have great success with your site!

Way to go champ(s)--Janet

Aunt Diana
inactive member


Joined: Thu Sep 29th, 2005
Location: Boquette, Panama
Posts: 1991
Status:  Offline
Amy,

This is fantastic!!! How brilliant of you to think of it. I'll bet it will make a big difference in the length of time it will take the MP to become more widely accepted. Think of all the people who can be helped by this.

Keep up the good work!!

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Janet, Aunt Diana,

Thanks for your kind words. I'm thrilled to be able to interview these researchers. In a few years, everbody will want to talk to them! Right now I can speak with them easily and even form friendships in the process.

The Nadya Markova interview is finally up.

http://bacteriality.wordpress.com/2007/09/09/markova-interview/

I also have a great interview with Alan Cantwell that should be ready soon. Alan Cantwell has a great personality. I laughed quite a bit during the interview. He certainly has a story to tell.

I've been working hard on an article about vitamin D. I have a lot to say on that subject! Should be up soon.

Thanks for your interest,

Amy

Foundation Staff
.


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location:  
Posts: 17204
Status:  Offline
Amy, Congratulations on an excellent interview with an important researcher.

Paul, Congratulations on designing a beautiful presentation for that interview.

Well done, guys! :)

Rico
Support Team
 

Joined: Tue May 30th, 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1530
Status:  Offline
Excellent interview, Amy. Interesting that Nadya knew of the MP and is also of the opinion that L-form bacteria are the heart of most chronic diseases.

Keep up the good work!

Rico

eClaire
inactive member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
Amy,  This is the best interview and I loved how she described the why of how difficult it is to get this sort of research published, which is the same issue for the MP in general (i.e., the need for a new paradigm).  I think it will be a great tool for MPers searching for a doctor.  THANKS!!!  Claire

P.S.  Keep up the great work! 

Last edited on Mon Sep 10th, 2007 06:27 by eClaire

Lee
Member


Joined: Sun Feb 13th, 2005
Location: Currituck, North Carolina USA
Posts: 688
Status:  Offline
Thank YOU Amy!!  I am in need of another new doc and this is just the ammunition I need!!  You GO GIRL!!  Lee & Hubby

Russ
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Mar 24th, 2006
Location: Hartford, Connecticut USA
Posts: 812
Status:  Offline
Amy, these interviews you're doing are great!  Thanks for sharing them with us.

I found the in-vivo animal experiments Dr. Markova talked about especially interesting...

"We inject the first group of animals with normal pathogenic bacteria and the other group with L-form strains...L-forms stay longer on the surface of macrophages without being engulfed. Even when they are engulfed, L-forms are not properly digested and they continue to persist inside the macrophage. In short, the whole process of destroying bacteria is distorted.  It is important to understand that these phenomena happen in vivo, or inside animals that are alive."

If I remember correctly, that's exactly what the MP science has told us is happening in humans with TH1 disease (macrophages not being able to destroy the L-forms).  I know that animal VDRs are not the same as the human VDR, but can we assume that since the animals in the experiement were not able to kill the L-forms that they must have had compromised immune systems either due to having TH1 disease or being fed vitamin D and/or steroids?  Basically I'm wondering whether a healthy immune system can kill L-forms or if the bacteria have evolved to be able to evade phagocytosis even in healthy immune systems and can only be killed with the help of benicar and antibiotics.

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Russ asks Basically I'm wondering whether a healthy immune system can kill L-forms
This is a good question, Russ. Answer is, we don't know yet. The pathogens must affect the immune system in some way, as cytokines and chemokines are released during all stages of the Th1 infection, including 'healthy aging'. But exactly what happens, and the sequence of events, is unclear. At some point some of the bacteria start to shut down the VDR. But is this fortituous? Which species does this? Maybe a harmless species involved purely in the aging process?

These are all imponderables right now. But excellent questions. One could construct a hypothesis where relatively harmless bacteria living in the intraphagocytic biofilms have for centuries (millenia) gradually shut down the body's hormonal system as it ages. It wasn't until Vitamin D supplementation became commonplace, perhaps, that the hormonal control systems get shut down at a younger age. Perhaps the proliferation of L-forms resulting from the overuse of penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics during the 1940s caused more L-forms to take advantage of weakened human bodies. Who knows?

We live in interesting times :)
 

eClaire
inactive member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
Trevor & Russ, Very interesting.  I've heard some folk describe CFS as "premature aging" (but not necessarily having to do with looks), which may apply to all Th1 illness.  Here's hoping the MP gives all of us back some of those years we've lost!  Claire

Russ
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Mar 24th, 2006
Location: Hartford, Connecticut USA
Posts: 812
Status:  Offline
Dr Trevor Marshall wrote: We live in interesting times :) 

Interesting times indeed, although sometimes I wish I was born about fifty years from now when medicine has come to it's senses and instead of lacing my baby formula with steroids they actually recognize and treat any neo-natal infections I have. :):):)

Thanks for the insightful response.

DianeC
Member


Joined: Fri Aug 19th, 2005
Location: New York, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
Hi Amy:D!

Congratulations to you and Paul on your website!!  The interviews are very interesting and informative and will go a long way toward spreading the word of L-forms and how they are the cause of chronic illness.  The layout of the site is very attractive and the interviews are wonderful!! 

Best wishes to you both.........this is a winner!!:D:)

DianeC 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
I'm glad that many of you enjoyed the Markova interview. She cetainly knows her stuff when it comes to L=form so I not surprised that she understands how the MP fits into the picture.

I just put up an interview with Alan Cantwell.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/09/11/cantwell/

Kudos to Paul for creating the image gallery at the end of the piece. Cantwell stressed to me over the phone that in order for people to fully appreciate his pictures of L-form bacteria it helps if the images are blown up to a large size that spreads across the computer screen. So Paul designed a gallery that allows the images to be enlarged. I must say I'm impressed myself!

Foundation Staff
.


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location:  
Posts: 17204
Status:  Offline
Very impressive, Amy and Paul. Thank you!

Rico
Support Team
 

Joined: Tue May 30th, 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1530
Status:  Offline
Very interesting interview, Amy. Thanks!

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Amy, you are doing great work !

You might be interested in the following paper, the full text is online:

- http://tinyurl.com/3xnosg

- http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/104/8/2927

I would start with reading the discussion, you will understand what I am trying to say. It seems to provide a missing link.

A question that arises when one reads this paper is how can normally culterable bacteria be unable to be cultured, even when proven to be on the site? L-forms?

Another question might be how much the (as yet) golden standard of culturing (in the pretri dish?) is missing because it just doesn't work properly? In other words: How many bacteria are actually in our tissues (and in this case: on our skin), once we start using PCR-analysis instead of the clearly outdated culturing?

Sincerely, Frans

NorCalJim
inactive member


Joined: Thu Aug 24th, 2006
Location: Sacramento, California USA
Posts: 142
Status:  Offline
Thanks Ames, I've really enjoyed the interviews you've done on your site...

NorCalJim

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
I was thinking and came to the following. These guys couldn't culture several bacteria that are normally cultivable, but found them with the PCR.

Now, wouldn't it be nice to let those samples be examined by Alan Cantwell, or one of the others mentioned on Amy's site, with electron microscopy or acid fast staining to see if they can find these elusive bacteria?

Of course this would have to be done blind. They get samples without knowing what is supposed to be there, do their thing, hand over their findings that are then cross referenced with the PCR results to see if their methods close the gap between 'normal culturing' and PCR naalysis?

Could that be done? Trevor, could the university you are an honorary professor of play a role in such an endeavour? As I understand it, the Gates foundation has funded a PCR lab?

This could finally and definitely build a bridge between L-form bacteria, the specialists that know they exist and the rest of the medical world... It would be great to finally see these pioneers validated

Sincerely, Frans

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Frans,
Such a demonstration would achieve nothing. I was chatting with Alan last night. He is aware that the L-form pleomorphs he saw in dead tissue are not the same as pleomorphs in a live human with a functioning immune system. This is the big problem.

I have a plan, and am executing on it, and we should have some definitive results within a year. But I would rather not 'show my hand' publicly just yet, Frans :):)
 

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Hehe, I should have known that you are 'at least' one step ahead of us all :D

On the other hand, in my mind this paper still makes a compelling case that bacteria áre pleomorphic and not monomorphic. If not in form, then at least in behaviour, since they can sometimes be cultured and sometimes they cannot. That shows that they behave differently at different times, under different circumstances and most probably also in dead and live tissue.

So, now I have to think hard about how you are trying to tackle things  :D

About not showing your hand publicly, you still have my email address, right?  :D:D  Just kidding, I'll wait and think hard about how one should go about this with live tissue

Sincerely, Frans

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Oh wow, I just noticed that this paper has been edited by Jeffrey Gordon. Yes the same...

Last edited on Sat Sep 15th, 2007 08:18 by Frans

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
Well done Amy & Paul!
The interview covered so much ground and yet was so clear to understand.
And the photo gallery is GREAT!
Thank you both!

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Thanks, Joyful. We're grateful Dr. Cantwell let us reproduce his images. I think it's a real tribute to this man's work to see, together, just a few of the scores of great images of bacteria he has captured through his miscroscope over the years.

Paul

Carole
Support Team


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 739
Status:  Offline
Congratulations, Amy and Paul, on your exceptional work!  I just became aware of your site this evening and am very impressed!  Thank you both so much for your time and effort toward such an excellent project! . . . Carole  :D

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thanks, Carole.

Frans, thank for the article. I printed it out and will read it soon. It surely goes to show that conventional lab tests are missing a large part of the picture.

My article about vitamin D is now up on Bacteriality:
http://bacteriality.com/2007/09/15/vitamind/

Yes, it’s long. But this is a big issue and there is much to discuss. In order to make the article more accessible I broke it up into fourteen different sections. The sections are listed after the introduction. You can click on the title of any section and you will be linked directly to the relevant area of the text.

This piece would not have been possible without the help of Joyce Waterhouse and Paul, who spent extended periods of time alerting me to research and editing my work. A word of thanks to my dear mother (Barbara on this site) for editing the piece as well.

A lot of my understanding of these issues comes directly from Dr. Marshall. Hopefully, this paper will hopefully whet your appetite for Trevor’s paper.

Hope you enjoy reading it. As always feedback is appreciated.

Amy

p.s. I hope this article will silence that annoying family member who insists vitamin D is good for you. By that, I mean you can print the article out, and drop it on their head, thereby rendering them unconscious. (The article is long. Get it?)

Foundation Staff
.


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location:  
Posts: 17204
Status:  Offline
That is a must-read, comprehensive compilation of vitamin D information. Thanks Amy, Joyce and Paul. :)

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline
Amy,
You know, I think your article really should have the eyes of many authors that I've written over a 2 year time. You definitely got the scoop, but I'm requesting that they take a look with something to the effect:

"This is a story that is bound to shake the foundations of the medical industry as it reveals the truth of the molecular mechanism that enables the human immune system...You may want to find your place in history and make some strategic plans as you review the evidence presented here."

And then of course, I am giving them a link to your site, specific to the D article. They should be looking around at the rest of the story too if they have done any research on the Web (wink).

Some of these press people have already seen an annotated bibliography and links into this site, but rejected the building blocks or other lead at that time. I'm refering to the specific time frame of my first dialogs individually with each note so they know my level of persistence.

Maybe they will look at some of the support evidence in PubMed. Somewhere, sometime soon, someone must eventually hit their forehead as they say "I could have had a... Pulitzer!" 

Keep up the good work Amy et al. Hmmm. Pulitzer. There's a thought a young medical writer might ponder.

Best to you all--Janet

MrsKeeper
inactive member
 

Joined: Mon May 16th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 214
Status:  Offline
Wonderfully done Amy! Thank you for putting succinct information in one place that's easy to direct people to. Now if there was only a way to inject this information into heads that are too stubborn to go to the site (or accept printouts) and read... :)

Your great effort and dedication is much appreciated. Thank you!

SherryH
inactive member


Joined: Sat Jul 1st, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 265
Status:  Offline
Wow, Amy!

  Just finished reading the vit D article on bacteriality.  So very impressed.  Yes, it's long, but every one of the points needed to be addressed.  I appreciate so much the eloquence you have and the style of writing that makes it easy for even me to understand!  I really feel that you are on the cusp of a very important body of work that, with persistence of getting this material into the hands of the reluctant majority, the hands of change just may begin to move. 

Thank you so much for your dedicated efforts here.  And to you, Paul and Joyce as well!!  Very well done!

Sherry

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thanks everyone for your nice comments!

Frans, I did write a piece that brings up the study you mentioned talks about reserachers using molecular methods to look at bacteria in the skin. Check it out:

http://bacteriality.com/2007/09/27/bacteriazoo/

Also, there is a new interview up on the site, with MP patient Sue Andorn who has a great success story.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/09/22/interview3/

A few days ago I contacted David Bradley, who writes for the science blog "ScienceBase". He took quite a bit of interest in the MP and ended up writing a piece about the treatment on his site. I tried to work with him to make sure he understood the science correctly and I think he did a pretty good job. Here's the link to his blog:

http://www.sciencebase.com/science-blog/quick-fix-for-chronic-disease.html

I particularly like this quote:

"Humans have always been seeking a panacea for our ills, an explanation for their cause. If there is a direct link between L-form bacteria and vitamin D and its metabolites, and the activity of our immune system, then could we be on the verge of finding what we seek?"

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Fri Sep 28th, 2007 10:25 by Ames

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Congrats to you, Amy! You are doing lots of good.

By the way, here is the first part of David Bradley's piece:
http://www.sciencebase.com/science-blog/quick-fix-for-chronic-disease.html

(There is a back button on the linked page Amy provided you but some of you might not notice it.)

Paul

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Excellent work, Amy (and Paul).
Let's see if the new server will hold up under the strain of all the new visitors:):)
 

Foundation Staff
.


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location:  
Posts: 17204
Status:  Offline
This is a milestone article written by a respected science writer, who is finally asking the right questions.

One reader's response to the article states, "It is fascinating. Dr. Marshall, right or wrong, is no crank."

Thanks, Amy! :D

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Ames wrote: Frans, I did write a piece that brings up the study you mentioned talks about reserachers using molecular methods to look at bacteria in the skin. Check it out:

http://bacteriality.com/2007/09/27/bacteriazoo/


Ames, that looks really good. I remember when reading a dutch abstract about the paper, that all alarmbells started ringing in my head.

I also read the piece by David Bradley, great work again ! Let's see what this will bring. He is keeping an open mind, which means a lot !

Keep up the good work guys !

Sincerely, Frans

Meredith Hill
Health Professional
 

Joined: Sun Nov 28th, 2004
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 29
Status:  Offline
Dear Staff,

It has been awhile since I have been on line.  I have recently been asked about doctors in Pa. who do the Marshall Protocol.  I had asked this months ago and printed off a list but I wonder if there has been an update.

Thank you.

Meredith Hill

Toni D
inactive member


Joined: Mon Aug 1st, 2005
Location: Altamonte Springs, Florida USA
Posts: 813
Status:  Offline
Meredith,

Here is a link to the new procedure for acquiring the name of MP doctors in your area:  http://www.marshallprotocol.com/forum11/9355.html

Hope all is well with you.  Feel good and be blessed.

 

ps--I think you've posted in the wrong forum; however, one of the moderators will have to redirect your post later.

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi guys,

Just wanted to check in. Theres a new piece up on Bacteriality about diet and disease.

"Diet and Disease: Eating for Health"

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/02/diet/

I also just put up an interview with Reenie (MP patient with CFS and fibro). Her story is particularly inspiring to me because many of my symptoms are similar to hers. She is doing very well.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/06/interview4/

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi guys,

I just put up a new piece on Bacteriality. It covers exactly how the MP antibiotics work, how Benicar works, and also discusses why low-dose, pulsed antibiotics must be used in order to kill L-form bacteria effectively.

I think it's important to stress to doctors that Trevor selected the MP antibiotics based on years of research and precise knowledge of their effects at the molecular level.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/11/antibiotics/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Fri Oct 12th, 2007 07:33 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

I just put up an interview with board moderator Belinda Fenter on Bacteriality

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/15/interview5/

I found it interesting to learn about the early days of the MP.....

Best,

Amy

Robertrr
inactive member


Joined: Wed Jul 13th, 2005
Location: Austin, Texas USA
Posts: 385
Status:  Offline
Hi Amy,

I just read the new interviews and articles.  Wow, what a great job and web site!  Thanks so much for putting that together for all of us to use as a reference site and as a site to refer others to. 

Keep up the good work!

Robert

Toni D
inactive member


Joined: Mon Aug 1st, 2005
Location: Altamonte Springs, Florida USA
Posts: 813
Status:  Offline
Great articles, fluent, easy to read.  Terrific job, Amy:D

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
Another excellent piece, you are really helping to get the message out!

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Robert, Toni, Joyful...thank you for such nice comments. I'm so glad you enjoy the articles!

Just wanted to let you know that I just put a new piece up on the site called "Babies and Bacteria: How pathogens may affect an infant during the first weeks of life"

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/17/infants/

I feel the research discussed in this article really sheds light on how a chronic disease develops - essentially many of the bacteria that we encounter during the first weeks of life can persist in our bodies and change the way our immune systems handles bacteria during the rest of our lives. I had several illnesses as a very young child and I'm sure those infections were the start of the CFS I developed later in life.

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

There's a new article up on Bacteriality;

"Duke University researchers connect vitamin D to brain lesions"

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/24/brain_lesions/

"....elderly men and women who consumed higher levels of calcium and, in particular, vitamin D are significantly more likely to have greater volumes of brain lesions, indicating regions of damage that can increase risk of cognitive impairment, dementia, depression and death."

Not very surprising to those of us on the MP, right?

Best,

Amy

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
Right!

I printed this right up and mailed it to a family member who is so very worried about getting dementia because of their parents experiences late in life.

Hopefully they will begin to look at things differently.

Mary
inactive member
 

Joined: Sat Aug 21st, 2004
Location: Breckenridge, Colorado USA
Posts: 131
Status:  Offline
Amy,

Thanks for your great articles..and for sharing them at this site! Very informative, simple to read and to understand.

mary

Martin78
inactive member


Joined: Sat Jul 14th, 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 220
Status:  Offline
Dear Amy

I learned that you have a twin sister, me myslf have a twin brother suffering from bipolar dissorder and some day I atleast hope he will be given the possibility of doing his D-tests. 

The Noregian Sarc. Organisation claims sarcoidosis to be more prevelent amongst twins, but they cannot back this up by research. I wonder, have you ever commed across such papers?

BR

Martin

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Martin,

Yes I do have a twin sister. That's cool that you have a twin brother but I'm very sorry he's suffering from bipolar disorder. My boyfriend's brother has bipolar disorder so I'm learning more about how hard it is to manage the illness. I also hope that his brother will also eventually do the MP.

I am actually in the process of writing an article about how Th1 disease spreads in families. What's important to understand is that is not similar genes that caused both you and your twin to fall ill with Th1 disease, but rather the fact that you were both likely both exposed to a great deal of L-form bacteria.

I don't know of any studies that have looked at the incidence of sarcoidosis in twins, althought I am confident that if research was done on the subject it would be found that twins are definitely more likely to both fall ill with sarc seeing as they often pass around many of the same pathogens.

The following studies do point out that spouses and family members have a greater chance of developing sarc if other members of the family are infected with bacteria that cause the disease...

"A six-year study of the Th1 disease sarcoidosis, conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Maryland found that among the 215 study participants who had been diagnosed with sarcoidosis, there were five husband-and-wife couples that both had the disease. Yet sarcoidosis is such a rare disease that based on statistics there should have been none. They also noted that the risk for sarcoidosis increased nearly five-fold in parents and siblings with the disease.

There have been other case reports of familial clustering of sarcoidosis. A case-controlled study of residents of the Isle of Man found that 40 percent of people with sarcoidosis had been in contact with a person known to have the disease, compared with 1 to 2 percent of the control subjects. One study reported three cases of sarcoidosis among 57 firefighters who apprenticed together."

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Fri Oct 26th, 2007 12:28 by Ames

eClaire
inactive member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
Hey Amy,

Thanks for the post about Vit D and brain lesions.  I had heard about that and yet the October AARP has a comment by some sort of expert telling seniors to take calcium and Vit D.  I am not up to it, but I'd certainly appreciate someone putting together at least a succient letter to the editor of AARP about that with the link to the research you site.  (And also the research that shows that Vit D has not positive affect on bone gain.)

Perhaps they'd take a full length article if you wrote one.  (Giving them a letter to the editor as a back up perhaps.)

Thanks for all that you are doing, Claire

Martin78
inactive member


Joined: Sat Jul 14th, 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 220
Status:  Offline
Hi Amy

Thank you for your answer, looking forward to your next article.

I will investigate this claim further since they so clearly state this and let you know.

BR

Martin

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hello!

Martin - A glimpse at the people reporting on this study site is a clear example of how Th1 disease runs in families - in terms of bacteria being passed among family members. There are many couples and siblings on the MP.

EClaire,

Thanks for the heads up on the AARP article. There seems to be an article hyping "vitamin" D's "benefits" everywhere I look. It's the same 'ol claims, which are backed up with no actual science - at least in the terms of the fact that not one of them provides a model of what vitamin D actually DOES in the body in order to provide all these supposed benefits. In contrast, Trevor has mapped out myriad pathways and receptors affected by the secosteroid/hormone by using molecular modeling. Hmmm....I wonder who is right? AARP would be a good place to make a statement. Maybe I'll toy with writing a letter. I just wonder if they'd published it. We'll see....

There is also a new interview up on Bacteriality. It's an interview with Robyn Russel. Her son Matt started the MP with a host of severe symptoms and is now is very close to complete recovery. I smiled the entire time I wrote the piece because his story is so inspiring and such a clear example of the ability of the MP to dramatically change lives.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/28/interview6/

Best,

Amy

Jeff
inactive member


Joined: Mon Jun 4th, 2007
Location: Delaware USA
Posts: 31
Status:  Offline
My boyfriend's brother has bipolar disorder so I'm learning more about how hard it is to manage the illness. I also hope that his brother will also eventually do the MP.
Amy, do you mean to suggest that you feel confident that his bipolar disorder is a result of Lyme or are there other Th1 disease L-Forms that often or even typically manifest symptoms of bipolar disorder?  Do you know of any good articles/research supporting this?

Thanks for the great work you're doing.

Jeff

GeorgeinRollaMO
inactive member


Joined: Mon Aug 9th, 2004
Location: Rolla, Missouri USA
Posts: 538
Status:  Offline
Jeff,

There is only ONE Th1 disease!!!

All of the names that I suppose that you want to hear are sets of symptoms that the medical community have given names to in their ignorance of the cause... Th1 inflammation.

Pay attention to your reading!!!  :X  :D

Wishing all wellness!!!  :)

Dark Vader...aka, George

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
It looks like the Autoimmune Disease folk are also starting to realize that there is but one type of disease, and that it runs in families. Take a look at this advert for the AARDA on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZKIcLx7gFA

(somebody needs to let them know what we have been doing)
 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Jeff,

That's right - all Th1 diseases have the same pathogenesis - they all result from infection by different forms of persistent bacteria. It is the species of bacteria that differ between people with different symptoms. The species of bacteria and other pathogens that a person accumulates over a lifetime (their infectious history) eventually determines what symptoms they develop.

On a separate note, I wanted to let you guys know that I have updated my vitamin D article based on a new paper written by Joyce Waterhouse PhD. I added a short discussion about the relationship of 25-D to Parathyroid Hormone based on her work. I feel it's important, because many doctors justify telling patients to supplement with vitamin D because they incorrectly think that it will lower PTH (elevated PTH has been linked to bone loss.)

Here is a link to Joyce's Article:

"Vitamin D, the Vitamin D Receptor and Chronic Disease -
Brain Lesions, Vascular Calcification and Osteoporosis:
Two Views of Vitamin D Supplementation and Parathyroid Hormone"
http://SynergyHN.com/lesions

It's definitely worth a read and an excellent document to show to doctors who are hesitant to accept the fact that vitamin D in not helpful in chronic disease.....

GeorgeinRollaMO
inactive member


Joined: Mon Aug 9th, 2004
Location: Rolla, Missouri USA
Posts: 538
Status:  Offline
Hi, Amy,

Once again, your new article is very impressive!!!!  :)

Thanks a bunch for writing them.

I tried the link to Joyce's new article and it will not work.  I tried it multiple times.

Wishing all wellness!!!

Dark Vader...aka, George

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thanks George...

Right,

I just told Joyce about the link myself, and she said:

"Unforunately, AOL goes through spells, where for a few seconds or minutes or longer, a link won't work to one of my articles on my web site. It hasn't happened in quite a while, but seems to be happening with my new article right now (the last two days it has been fine). Usually, you can still get to them by google, though in this case it is so new, it doesn't seem to be turning up on a search.

I suggest trying again in a few seconds if it doesn't work and if it still doesn't work try an hour or two later. Unfortunately, they no longer give any support for their free web site service that I have used for the last 10 years"

Maybe Paul can help her fix that situation later tonight.......

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
I have asked someone to put a pdf of it online as a backup and I'll provide the link when I get it.  I think the original link will probably work later (it worked fine during the two days before). 

But I think the pdf backup will be good to have in case it happens again.

Here is the new pdf link:  http://winmlm.neostrada.pl/mp/jw/BrainLesions.pdf

Joyce

Last edited on Tue Oct 30th, 2007 16:42 by jcwat101

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
I just wanted to mention that I made about 5 minor corrections/clarifications (probably things only I would notice) in that article and that the original link now works and hopefully will continue to.

The pdf version will probably be corrected later today.

Joyce Waterhouse

 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Congrats again Joyce..great article!

I'm writing because there are TWO new articles up on Bacteriality.

One is an interview with Dr. Grey Blaney - MP Physician:

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/31/blaney/

And the other article is called "Bacteria vs. genes: the spread of chronic disease in families."

http://bacteriality.com/2007/10/31/family/

It's the article about familial aggregation and successive mutation that I mentioned earlier.

Thanks for readin'!

Amy

Rico
Support Team
 

Joined: Tue May 30th, 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1530
Status:  Offline
Wow! You're amazing, Amy! I look forward to your articles almost as much as Dr Marshall's ;)  Thanks!

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
On Amy's behalf, thanks, Rico. These two were actually some of my favorite articles (thus far!).

Some of you have complained about the small text size on bacteriality. That's something we hope to address shortly. In the meantime, if you want to manually change the text size of your browser window, try following these instructions:
http://www.metnet.edu/textsize.html

FYI, this change is probably easiest in the Firefox/Safari browser.

Paul

EDIT: Oops, I'm logged in as Amy.

Last edited on Thu Nov 1st, 2007 07:36 by Ames

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
You can change the size of the displayed text in Windows by holding down the Control key and rolling the roller on your mouse.
 

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Ames,

I just read the interview with dr Blaney and it is really interesting. It would however be interesting to add a comment at the top of the article about how many patients dr Blaney is actually treating at this point. I remember from during the LA conference that that number was about 160 or more. It will blow people away. Or at least, it did that to me when I heard it...

By the way, thanks for making my time at home (because of the flu) a little better with all this stuff to read :D  Don't know how to keep up when I start working again  ;)

Sincerely, Frans

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Frans- that a good point. I would love to know how many patients he has on the MP and I should have thought to ask that! But Dr. Blaney is super, super, busy so I have no idea if I will be able to get in touch with him and ask the question (I will try).

There is a new patient interview up with MP patient Shirley J who is known here as SAJ.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/04/interview7/

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi guys,

Remember David Bradley? He wrote an article about the MP on his blog Sciencebase about a month ago. Now his blog is up for the award "best science blog" and I think it would be great if he wins because he has a link to Bacteriality on his site and also may write about the MP in the future because we keep in touch and he's interested in the subject.

If you want to vote go here:

http://2007.weblogawards.org/polls/best-science-blog-1.php

Vote for Sciencebase.

Best,

Amy

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Amy,
I registered my vote for ScienceBase

I found it interesting that in today's blog David Bradley says he suffers from Asthma, and that he is "still on the standard dose of twice-daily Beclomethasone."

I used exactly the same Beclomethasone to control my most recent lung immunopathology. It is quite a stong steroid, very effective in the sinuses and lungs, and sold over-the-counter in the UK. I found one dose was enough to knock the immunopathology down for about 8 hours. We may have an influential Th1 sufferer here...
 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Trevor,

Very interesting. I had not read that myself. In the coming days I'll shoot him an email on the subject!

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Amy,
Let's not contact him again. David knows about the MP, and would come here if he needs to. We don't want to be seen to be "pushy." :)

It is so frustrating that there are so many paradigm barriers that we have broken through all at once, and yet other folk have to deal with understanding them one at a time...:(
 

arhayw
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Jul 23rd, 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 191
Status:  Offline
I didn't know there was such a thing as a best science blog award. It's too late now, but how about keeping a bookmark here for next year and campaign for a Bacteriality nomination!

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Aw thanks arhayw, that's very nice of you!

Just announcing that two new articles are up:

"Of mice and men: Are the scientific studies you read accurate?"

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/07/mice/

And also an interview with Carole Morgan, who is Carole the board moderator on this site.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/08/interview8/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Wed Nov 7th, 2007 20:50 by Ames

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
I just wanted to say that I have improved the references (adding links to the ones with free full text), and adding one reference (#22) and two or three other minor changes to my article.  Last week before the AAEM conference, I didn't have time to correct the references, which I discovered had several errors.

So, anyway, if you are going to give a copy to a doctor etc..., you might want to print out a new copy of the article:

Vitamin D, the Vitamin D Receptor and Chronic Disease --
Brain Lesions, Vascular Calcification and Osteoporosis:
Two Views of Vitamin D Supplementation and Parathyroid Hormone: http://synergyhn.com/lesions/ 

I will try to have the pdf version corrected within the next 24 hours.  It will be at:  http://winmlm.neostrada.pl/mp/jw/BrainLesions.pdf

Joyce Waterhouse

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

There is also a new interview up on Bacteriality...with Julia Greer (Julia on this site). The interview was conducted in written format. I sent Julia the questions and she responded with witty and insightful comments - I'm impressed. This is one of my favorite interviews and I didn't even write it!

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/10/interview9/

Enjoy!

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Oh, yet another interview to annouce...one with Paul Albert. Somehow I knew his story before even asking the questions...

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/10/interview10/

Don't forget to check out Julia's interview too (link in the post above this one)

Last edited on Sat Nov 10th, 2007 18:27 by Ames

Rico
Support Team
 

Joined: Tue May 30th, 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1530
Status:  Offline
Loved the end to your latest interview, Amy :)

Rest is good too, of course...some of Paul's issues resonate with both me and my wife. Thanks.

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Rico - glad you enjoyed Paul's interview!

I put up a new piece today:

"Eye inflammation, vision, and bacteria"

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/13/eyes/

You'll notice that my Mom is one of the MP patients who is happy with the resolution of her eye symptoms thanks to the MP. I'm very glad about that....

Amy

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Amy is a busy bee. Here's her latest interview, this one is with Mirek who recovered from sarcoidosis:
http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/17/interview11/

Sorry if I'm ruining the suspense but he gets better! (Surprise, surprise.)

Paul

Last edited on Sat Nov 17th, 2007 20:30 by paulalbert

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Just announcing another piece:

"Aging and the resurrection of the immune system"

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/18/aging/

While writing this article I became truly convinced that I will indeed live a long and very healthy life.

By the way, happy early Thanksgiving to all. I have much to be thankful for with my improving health toping the list. I will be leaving tomorrow for a short T-giving vacation.

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

Hope everyone had a good Thanksgiving.

I just put up a new interview on Bacteriality - with Leesa Shanahan

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/19/interview12/

She has three young kids and is active with them once again.

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

I just put up an interview with Sherry Cook (scooker48 on this site) up on Bacteriality.

http://bacteriality.com/2007/11/19/interview13/

The success stories are adding up!

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

As most of you hopefully know ARF needs to raise $5000 by the end of December to match a donation of the same amount that was given by a very generous family.

Carol suggested, and I agree, that perhaps in certain cases people might want to tell friends and family to donate to ARF in lieu of getting a Christmas present - basically have them donate to ARF the sum of money they would have put towards your gift.

Of course this doesn't mean that everyone should give up Christmas presents but in particular if you have family members that buy you gifts you never really end up using then the above strategy might be a good idea!

I wrote a template letter that people could use to send to friends and family.  It's availiable here:

http://friendsofarf.org/forum3/8.html

Of course it may have to be adapted a little from person to person but I think it's a good general template for anyone on the MP.

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Sat Dec 1st, 2007 20:00 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

I just put a new article up on Bacteriality.  It's called "Why the Marshall Protocol makes sense"

http://bacteriality.com/

in the course of interviewing people who have succeeded on the MP, I am frequently told that when they found the MP and Dr. Marshall's research it "just made sense!'

In this article I describe the top ten reasons why the MP makes sense to me.  I thought it might be a good way to show dubious family members and new MPers why we are certain that we will get our health back.

Amy

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Bacteriality.com just got a redesign. The font size is a bit bigger. The columns are wider.

Still to do:
1. make the @$%^#! RSS feeds work

If you see anything else that I forgot or should think about doing, please let me know!

Thanks to Janet for helping me with the header.

Paul

Last edited on Mon Dec 10th, 2007 14:44 by paulalbert

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

Just a quick post to let you know that Paul has written an article for Bacteriality.

'What can medical research learn from the open source software movement?"
http://bacteriality.com/2007/12/11/opensource/

Remember how Andy Grove criticized the slow pace of medical research? Well, in many ways this piece provides answers to some of his concerns. But it delves into other topics as well. I certainly learned a lot myself by reading the article!

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!  Paul and I are back from vacation in Mexico City.  I held up very well...yeah!  Now it's back to writing and continuing to learn more about more science related to the MP that never fails to fascinate me.

Today I put up a new interview.  It's with P. Bear R.N. - one of the extremely helpful moderators on this board.  His story is an inspiring one and he has conquered numerous conditions thanks to the MP.  PB himself wrote out the answers to the questions, I only edited them...

Here it is:

http://bacteriality.com/2007/12/28/interview14/

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

Just announcing that a new article is up on Bacteriality which discusses the latest research on L-form bacteria carried out by a team of researchers in Spain. It turns out that when they replicate, L-form bacteria might form a temporary cell wall after all.....

http://bacteriality.com/2008/01/06/cellwall/

The finding were published in BioEssays, the same journal in which Dr. Marshall's article on Vitamin D will appear next month.

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi all,

I'm posting for a reason other than an article on Bacteriality. At the moment I am also working on an article for another venue about cognitive impairment in people with CFS. I desperately need examples of patients with CFS who found that once they started to become ill, it was harder to understand things, or process instructions, or remembers things...or anything along those lines. I know I suffered from all of the above, but don't want to use myself as an example.

If you have CFS and could give me a few examples of how you think your cognitive function declined as you got sick I'd be extremely grateful. In the article I'm not going to portray you as dumb - I am going to emphasize that the cognitive issues are ONLY part of your disease. Furthermore, I don't even have to use your real name.

If you can help me out, please email me at amy.proal@gmail.com - even if it's only a few comments.

Thanks so much!

Amy

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Ames, you might want to look into the several histamine and serotonin receptors that appear in Wang et al's paper in supplemental table 4. Several are probably transcribed by the VDR, possibly creating a host of these problems.

The same goes for dopamine receptors. VDR does not transcribe histamine 3 receptor, but 1, 2 and 4. If these three aren't there the H3 receptor might be overreacting due to too much histamine floating around and the H3 receptor downregulates dopamine levels as I understand it.

If I am not mistaken, hisatamine, serotonin and dopamine are neurotransmitters, so if the VDR doesn't transcribe essential receptors for these neurotransmitters...

Sincerely, Frans

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Frans,

Thanks for the tips. You know your stuff! Actually though, in the presentation I am not going to try to explain the mechanisms behind the cognitive dysfunction in people with CFS, just provide case histories and examples that illustrate that the illness truly does have a cognitive component.

I would like to thank all the people who with CFS who wrote me about their cognitive histories. The information is invaluable and has allowed me to move forward on the project. I'll tell you more about it as I finalize my abstract,

On a separate note, I am now looking for feedback on another issue. I am looking for any women who found they had PMS before starting the MP and now their PMS is getting better or has resolved. I spoke to a researcher yesterday who is really interested in this data and if I can give him some info I think he will take a serious look at the MP.

So once again, if your PMS has improved please email me at amy.proal@gmail.com

Thanks so much!

Amy

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Frans,
I can integrate that stuff into my own presentation, which is focused on the Molecular Biology.. Thanks for the tips :):)
 

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Ames, Trevor, you are both more than welcome.

Trevor, you might want to add:

- histamine N-methyltransferase (wang, table 4)

which is purported to be one of the two enzymes that disable histamine and has been tied to colonic adenoma, PMID  17562173

(the other enzyme is diamine oxidase, btw, did not find that one in wang's)

I am not certain how all these things work, I have read a lot on wikepedia about it, but for the real intracacies you'll have to dig in yourself I am afraid, or maybe someone on the prof. forum knows more?

Maybe another perspective could be to search wang's list with: syndrome

I have worked through a lot of the descriptions of the symdromes mentioned in wang's and something keeps popping up:  mental retardedness...  but to be fair, these syndromes had a lot more in common. I will try to make a list.

Have fun,

Sincerely, Frans

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
This is Amy, although my avatar shows Paul.  I'm working on his laptop today as mine broke down last night, tear..

Hi,

Most of you probably know Fred from West Virginia as he posts often on this site and is a loyal advocate for the MP.  I interviewed Freddie about his progress thus far on the MP and the piece is now up on Bacteriality:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/01/18/interview15/

Freddie's case is a great example of how effectively the MP can work for patients with heart conditions.  His interview will hopefully whet you appetites for a piece about bacteria and cardiovascular disease that I plan to put up in a few days.

Best,

Amy

PS I am still looking for anybody who's found that their symptoms of PMS have improved since starting the MP

Last edited on Tue Jan 22nd, 2008 10:13 by paulalbert

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hello!

My piece about cardiovascular disease is finally up:

Healing from cardiovascular disease: bacteria,fat, cholesterol, and more.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/01/26/cad/

I wanted to write an article about heart disease because it affects a huge part of the population and those people who are using the MP to treat all kinds of cardiovascular issues as seeing great improvement. I hope to see more people with heart disease start the MP as it is clearly caused by L-form bacteria and can be reversed.

Best,

Amy

Mary
inactive member
 

Joined: Sat Aug 21st, 2004
Location: Breckenridge, Colorado USA
Posts: 131
Status:  Offline
Thanks, Amy! A brother of mine is 3 weeks into recovery from a right coronary blockage...hence stent placed. He will find this article very informative and thought provoking. He is a bit familiar with the Marshall Protocol, as I sent him to the MP site when his son was diagnosed with Lyme disease.

Thanks for your hard work!

Mary

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Mary,

Thanks for writing.  I'm so glad the article may be able to help your brother understand how the MP can benefit patients with heart disease!

I also have one other concern.  I have been contacted by someone who told me that when they try to access Bacteriality using the browser Firefox the connections are extremely slow.  Has anyone else noticed this or any other Firefox related problems? 

Thanks,

Amy

Rico
Support Team
 

Joined: Tue May 30th, 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1530
Status:  Offline
Amy, I use Firefox 2.0.0.11 and have seen no performance problems.

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
As always, excellent work Amy! :cool:

I don't have any performance trouble with Firefox + Cable high-speed internet. :)

I don't know if it is Firefox or that in combination with using [ctrl]+ to increase the font size, but some of the photo titles are partly covered by the article's body text. :?

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Frans wrote: I was thinking and came to the following. These guys couldn't culture several bacteria that are normally cultivable, but found them with the PCR.

Now, wouldn't it be nice to let those samples be examined by Alan Cantwell, or one of the others mentioned on Amy's site, with electron microscopy or acid fast staining to see if they can find these elusive bacteria?

Of course this would have to be done blind. They get samples without knowing what is supposed to be there, do their thing, hand over their findings that are then cross referenced with the PCR results to see if their methods close the gap between 'normal culturing' and PCR naalysis?

Could that be done? Trevor, could the university you are an honorary professor of play a role in such an endeavour? As I understand it, the Gates foundation has funded a PCR lab?

This could finally and definitely build a bridge between L-form bacteria, the specialists that know they exist and the rest of the medical world... It would be great to finally see these pioneers validated

Sincerely, Frans


Hi,

There is something else on my mind concerning this. A lot of studies are being done on cancerous cell-lines from all sorts of cancer. Now if we want to prove cancer is bacterial, wouldn't it be a good idea to take those cancer cells, grind them up and use PCR to see what is in there?

Just a thought,

Frans

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
When you 'grind up' phagocytes the lysosomes will destroy any intra-cytoplasmic bacteria.
 

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Hmm, so grinding doesn't work :)  I see I must study again on how PCR analysis of cells actually works :?

Frans

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Frans,
I know how to do it. We already have a 'deal' with the Human Genome project to do the sequencing of single cells. I just need a team of post-docs and a lab to do all the hard work :X
 

Frans
Member*


Joined: Sun Feb 20th, 2005
Location: Near Rotterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Perhaps we could wake up these guys to this idea?

- PMID: 16688821

But then again, I guess the main thing is budget... and this is not exactly a 'mainstream' idea where they will line up with bags full of money...  pff, this could really really stir up things...  Relman perhaps?

This all reminds me of HeLa cell contamination. I am re-reading Alan Cantwell's books who explained how that happened.

Sincerely, Frans

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Dave Relman's group has the capability. Given the money I am sure they could get results in just a few months, we could take several years to piece all the technologies together. I spoke with Dave at Metagenomics 2007, and he now knows about the microbiota. To date he has expressed no interest in it, or our work. Stanford is driven by money, I guess...
 

migsies
inactive member


Joined: Sat Mar 26th, 2005
Location: Gainesville, Florida USA
Posts: 101
Status:  Offline
Have you talked to any evolutionary biologists/microbiologists not affiliated with medical establishments about potential collaboration? My hunch is that there would be a lot less politics and lot more interest in the basic biology of L-forms, such as molecular biodiversity and life history, coming from this group of researchers (Woese tradition). Furthermore, nowadays they are all equipped with good molecular facilities. Maybe someone could be tempted to conduct a pilot study using in house post-docs and/or advanced graduate students and internal funding, which could then be used as a stepping stone towards obtaining the level of funding required to take those sorts of projects to the next level (NIH/NSF). I know, it would take time, but that is how these things are usually done, as the major funding sources are extremely conservative and only fund projects for which the results are already known! (you have probably heard Venter talk/complain about this). My concern is that medical researchers will not see L-forms as a research priority until there are solid, preliminary MOLECULAR studies demonstrating presence and genetic affiliations for CWD's, hence potential medical implications, and I can only see these initial studies coming from biologists interested in organismal diversity and basic biology :(

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Unfortunately, PCR is not quite good enough for the sequencing we need. Murdoch has the latest PCR machines, but we need the capabilities of the Human Genome folks at DOE. I spoke with them, and with many other groups at Metagenomics 2007...
 

B R H
inactive member
 

Joined: Mon Oct 16th, 2006
Location: Reno, Nevada USA
Posts: 272
Status:  Offline
Speaking of Stanford... has anybody else seen this?  Maybe I'm just easily amused, but I just couldn't keep from laughing out loud!  Glad I wasn't in the audience!  :)

http://med.stanford.edu/medcast/2008/vitamind.html

JCB
member


Joined: Thu Jul 29th, 2004
Location: Connecticut USA
Posts: 39
Status:  Offline
The Stanford doc mentions this med called Asentar - a 50-100X dose of Vit D used for advanced cancer therapy. At least they seem to allow that the trials are not going so well. 

Asentar for prostate cancer, a potential blockbuster

Men's Health News

Published: Wednesday, 24-Jan-2007

A tablet designed to emulate the healing power of the sun could be available for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer as early as 2009.
But it remains to be seen whether the drug will be the revolution in prostate cancer care that its makers claim.

The drug, Asentar (DN-101), is based on vitamin D and is given to patients in the advanced stages of prostate cancer along with chemotherapy drugs. Drug makers came up with the idea because vitamin D from sunlight improves the prognosis of certain cancers. But taking natural levels of the vitamin has no effect. Novacea, the company that makes Asentar, produced a novel formulation that reproduces the healing effect without the dangerous side-effects of a vitamin D overdose. If the on-going phase III trial goes to plan, the new drug should be available in 2009, reports Chemistry & Industry, the magazine of the SCI.

'If the results of the phase III trial are as good as those of the phase II trial, that would be significant,' says Nick James, professor of oncology at the University of Birmingham. In the phase II trials, Asentar significantly improved survival rates, 9 months over patients taking chemotherapy drugs (taxotere) alone. 'On average, patients in the advanced stage of the disease survive about 18 months, so an extension of 9 months would be very significant in my view,' says James.

Asentar provides levels of vitamin D 50-100 times higher than normal. Patients would be expected to take one tablet once a week with their weekly regime of taxotere for three weeks out of every four.

Business analysts say Asentar is a potential blockbuster, because prostate cancer rates are expected to soar in the next few years. But James is not so sure. 'A confounding factor is that if you go looking for more cases of cancer, you will find them. But this does not give you an accurate estimate of how many people will go on to develop advanced disease. In fact death rates are going down, which means that the market for this drug is probably pretty static.'

James also points out that it is far from certain that the Phase III trials will repeat the success of early trials. 'The phase II trial used a less than optimal taxotere regime so the survival rate may have been artificially inflated,' he says. He points out, however, that it may be that the Asentar will eventually prove applicable in the earlier stages of the disease.

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Prostate cancer kills one man every hour in the UK.

migsies
inactive member


Joined: Sat Mar 26th, 2005
Location: Gainesville, Florida USA
Posts: 101
Status:  Offline
Just an observation concerning the Stanford presentation...

1) Throughout the talk he touts the therapeutic benefits of 1,25D (calcitriol) yet the slide headings are "Vitamin D:...". This is a bit sloppy and misleading to the lay person, who might confuse vitamin D (25D) supplementation with 1,25D (or analog) administration. This sort of innatention to detail would be bad form in a biochemistry department and should be considered bad form in a medical department, perhaps even more so, given the health implications. I know, this seems a bit petty, but how will the huge misconceptions about "vitamin D" portrayed in the media ever be rectified when the "experts" don't use the correct terminology, with consistency.

And some legitimate questions (mostly rhetorical?)...

2) Are the genetic mutations he associates with "vitamin D metabolic dysfunction" commonly seen among folk with the multitude of conditions that he cites or is his assessment based on mouse or other models?

3) Is there an absolute relationship between these mutations and levels of dysfunction or merely a statistical correlation, meaning, a substancial number of folk with some subset of these mutations have no disease? In which case, is it possible that these mutations merely constitute predisposing factors, perhaps by creating just enough immune suppression to favor L-form colonization and further suppression?

Of course, the role of infection in precipitating and accelerating innate immune dysfunction, via VDR suppression, and the implications for disease are missing from the discussion. But this is no surprise as the "Marshall pathogenesis" is cutting edge science.

Maybe Dr. Marshall will chime in at some point with some pearls of wisdom. Then again, he may be tired of feeling like he is beating a dead horse.;)

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Then again, he may be tired of feeling like he is beating a dead horse

Yup. True.
An eminent 80yo (approx) UK physician wrote a letter in answer to my BioEssay, arguing cogently that 25-D was a better marker than 1,25-D. Not once in the letter did the words "gene" or "VDR" appear, and she was stuck in the concepts of a first-order metabolism, totally ignoring the complexities in my Figure 1. These folk have a lot of un-learning to do, as well as needing training in precision of thought.

I declined to answer the letter, as this physician is a well known advocate of supplementation in the UK, and she has spent her life in the service of mankind. What could I say? I didn't want to be cruel, and, in any case, you can't teach an old dog new tricks :X
 
Oh - as for mutations - where do they come from? Caused by the pathogens, of course... Some may just be due to DNA 'noise' arising when genes are being sequenced, when genes are pasted together, even though they don't come from the target organism (Homo sapiens). Not real 'mutations', in that latter case...
 
 

Last edited on Sun Feb 10th, 2008 09:34 by Prof Trevor Marshall

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

I'll just jump into the middle of this discussion to let you know that I just put up an interview with evolutionary biologist Paul Ewald on Bacteriality:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/02/11/ewald/

We discuss how if you approach chronic diseases from an evolutionary viewpoint, they simply must be caused by pathogens.  If chronic diseases were genetic in origin they would have been eliminated from the population long ago.  Right on Dr. Ewald!

Best,

Amy

migsies
inactive member


Joined: Sat Mar 26th, 2005
Location: Gainesville, Florida USA
Posts: 101
Status:  Offline
Thanks Dr. Marshall and Amy. FWIW, I agree, most mutations are probably a byproduct of the host-pathogen arms race, however, I also suspect that every so often some of these mutations, if they occur in the germline, make it to the next generation, where they become the subject of evolutionary processes. On an optimistic note, this is probably a very rare event and manifests very early on in life, compared to the ravages of pathogen induced ageing (Th1), which affects all of us, albeit in unique ways, and can now be tackled with the MP.

Anyway, I was curious about the claims in the Stamford presentation that those particular mutations were resonsible for the observed effects on vitamin D metabolism because my understanding is that genetic loci are frequently polymorphic without obvious effects on genetic "fitness" (succeptibility to disease). I suspect there are many instances where the quest to explain away disease leads us to misinterpret neutral, inoquous mutations, as causal, when it is the effect of host-pathogen interactions on gene regulation and the heritability of these pathogens that is at the root of the problem. Perhaps that is the case here.:)

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Interesting observations Migsies...

Just posting quickly to let you know there is now an interview with MP patient Melinda Stiles on Bacteriality.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/02/17/interview16/

Melinda was exposed to myriad pathogens over the course of her life and has done an excellent job of killing them with the MP.  Another compelling recovery story.....

Best,

Amy

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
:) Another awesome interview Amy!

Thanks for keeping the inspiration coming! :)

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thank YOU Joyful for being such an avid reader of my pieces! 

I put up a new piece today.  It's called "Top 14 misconceptions about the MP: addressed and explained"

http://bacteriality.com/2008/02/23/misconceptions/

I receive a lot of emails from people looking into the MP who always have similar concerns about the treatment.  I've also posted in numerous discussion forms where people are confused about some of the major tenets of the MP.  I find myself addressing the same questions again and again - is Benicar safe?  What if my blood pressure drops?  Why can't I take supplements? 

Or concerns like, But doctor Marshall isn't a medical doctor, so how can I take him seriously? Or, when will a double-blind placebo controlled study be done on the MP? Or, "I heard the MP made somebody feel worse! (as if that's not something to be expected)." Or, "The MP must not be working because my kidney blood tests are out of range!", etc.

There are answers to all these concerns and usually people's worries are unwarranted or their views are based on incomplete information.  Those issues are what this piece attempts to address.

Obviously I got a lot of information for this piece off this study site, so as I say in the introduction, I'd like to thank Belinda and Meg for compiling a great deal of the information that I used in the first place.

Best,

Amy

Guss Wilkinson
inactive member


Joined: Tue Sep 7th, 2004
Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
Posts: 153
Status:  Offline
Hi Ames (and Paul)

Very good...very useful.

Your website is rapidly becoming the site of choice when I direct people who want to know more about the MP and the diseases they suffer from.

Well done

Cheers

Guss

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thanks very much Gus - but I'd like to make clear that my website can't substitute for this site.  I've tried to take a different angle on the science, approching it from a journalistic perspective, which is something the moderators simply can't do on a study site.  But there is a ton of valuable info on this site not mentioned on Bacteriality and I always insist that anyone interested in the MP read this site as well as my blog.

Today I'm writing to let you know there is a new interview up on Bacteriality.  I interviewed Jane Taylor - a woman who started the MP in the early days and not surpringly is doing very well.  I was also very happy to learn that Jane has before/after pictures of some of her symptoms as well as a graph of her ACE level.  Also note how many of her blood tests have come back into range thanks to the MP.  Very encouraging!

Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/02/interview17/

PS Jane wrote the interview, I helped her edit it......

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi! As usual I'm annoucing a new article.  As you may have read in another thread I will be  giving a poster presentation at the upcoming Days of Molecular Medicine Conference in Karolinska Sweden.  The following article describes what I will be presenting at the conference.

"Cognitive dysfunction in women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: examining the role of the endometrium, the nuclear receptors, and antimicrobial peptides"

Here's the article:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/09/cognitive-dysfunction/

I'm really excited to go to the conference and present this information in person!

Amy

eClaire
inactive member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
Amy,

If I could comprehend your article:shock:, I'm sure I'd be saying, "It was great!"

Looking forward to reading it in a couple of years when I get my brain back!;)

Claire

Caitiegirl
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Oct 26th, 2007
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status:  Offline
Congratulations Amy on an excellent paper. Good Luck with it in Karolinska!

My daughter and I were just talking about how useless CBT* is. She has had OCD symptoms off and on since she was 10. Medicines have not helped and neither did any attempt at behavioral therapy. But oh Clindamyocin! Does it ever hit the OCD symptoms. We can see so much of ourselves in your case histories. I was a microbiologist but now I can't remember my zip code or my name on a bad day. I recently wrote the wrong name on my name tag at a dinner. I refuse to believe this is about the normal aging process, especially when I see my 17 year old struggling with the same issues at an earlier age. I hope you and the team can successfully draw attention to the real disease pathology at work so all of us mothers can stop joking about having to "donate" our brain cells with each pregnancy.
Regards,
Mindy

* [Moderator's Note: CBT =  Cognitive Behavior Therapy.]

laura1814
Member*


Joined: Sun May 13th, 2007
Location: Southeast Texas, USA
Posts: 471
Status:  Offline
Wow, what an amazing paper. I think I understood perhaps a third of it, no reflection on your writing skills but rather my own level of brain fog.

But it seems that I am somewhat fortunate in the level of brain fog I have suffered. While it has been bad, and I have covered up a lot of it over the years, it never approached the level of the women you highlight in this article. Indeed, I was actually able to take and pass (barely) the Texas Bar Exam while I was sick in 2000. My cognitive dysfunction is palpable as immunopathology as I progress on the MP.

As an aside, would it be possible for someone to change the title of this thread to reflect that it is about many of your articles, not just one?

Good luck at Karolinska!

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Clare, Caitiegirl, and Laura,

I'm glad to hear that you seem to have gotten the "gist" of the paper, if not all the exact mechanisms I discussed.  This is definitely the most complicated piece I have put up on Bacteriality- usually the pieces are easier to understand.  I made an exception and put this last piece up even though it was somewhat complicated because I want my readers to know what I will be presenting at Karolinska.  Describing the issues in conversational format also helped me get my thoughts together so that hopefully I can better adressess the questions and challenges that will pop up at the conference itself. 

I too found CBT to be a total waste of money.  I remember being on a huge waiting list to see a prestigious CBT doctor and then feeling exactly the same after many appointments. 

I used to think that perhaps I could "think my way out" of symptoms, but the MP has quelled that idea.  Now that I realize the complexity of the dysregulation that occurs in chronic inflammatory disease, I understand how naive it is to think that we can change our biology by changing our thinking. 

Amy

Last edited on Sat Mar 15th, 2008 09:20 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hello again!  This time I'm writing to tell let you know that I just put up a new patient interview on the site.  This one is unique because it is the first time I have asked someone to report on progress at the end of phase 1. 

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/15/interview18/

I spoke with Doreen V, mother of Brendon, an 18-year-old who is using the MP to treat mild autism, other behavioral disorders, and CFS.  Although the interview focuses on Brendon's experience with phase 1, his entire family, including Doreen are also on the MP. 

They are recoving as a family and I think this interview proves that it can be done - an entire family can use the MP to get their health back and all move towards better health at the same time.

During phase 1 Brendon experienced periods of social activity that indicate his autism indeed seems to be responding to the MP.  Exciting!

Amy


k
Member*
 

Joined: Thu Aug 9th, 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 1274
Status:  Offline
I just wanted to say that about 10 years ago I had some CBT therapy for anxiety and also depression.  It was a HUGE help to me.  Liberating and empowering.  So there are some people who benefit.

I cannot see however, how it would make one iota of difference to CFS/ME which I now have.  I was totally shocked that to discover that it is an advocated treatment for CFS/ME.  I can see how it may be beneficial in helping you to adjust to life with a chronic and debilitating illness.  But I absolutely cannot see how it could possibly ever make any difference to the underlying condition.  Madness.

k

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
I put a new piece up on Bacteriality today.  I talk about two articles I read recently on vitamin D on two different science blogs.  One of the blog entries was written by Dr. Len Lichenfeld, head of the American Cancer Society, who has a very reasonable view about vitamin D.  It's a breath of fresh air to here him discuss the fact that more studies must be done on vitamin D before people decide to supplement with more of the substance, and also that the current view on viatmin D is squewed because some proponents of vitamin D are acting more like zealots then scientists. 

I also discuss a post by Steven Strauss on the CBC blog where he points out many of finanacial conflicts of interest that influence the vitamin D debate.   Here you go:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/22/vitamind2/

K,

Thanks for sharing your experience with CBT.  I guess, as you say, it can have a positive effect for some people.  However, in my article I was focusing on what you also mentioned - that the only way to actually target the underlying cause of the diseases today is the MP. 

Last edited on Sun Mar 23rd, 2008 08:24 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hello!

I put a new interview up on the site today.  It's with Ken L.  He doesn't post on the board, but the MP has done wonders in allowing him to recover from Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome.  As you will see in the interview, he also suffered from many symptoms associated with MS.  Although he was never officially diagnosed with the disease, in my opinion he probably could have been.  Just goes to show how greatly the Th1 diseaes overlap.....

Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/03/31/interview19/

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Good morning!

I put a new piece up on Bacteriality last night. 

I'm fascinated by the phenomenon of horizontal gene transfer, as I don't think it's possible for any of us to truly envision what our bacterial loads are like without taking into account the reality that bacteria and other pathogens are trading DNA all the time.

So I called up two of the top researchers in the field of horzontal gene transfer - Dr. Peter Gogarten at the University of Connecticut, and Dr. James Lake at UCLA.  They were friendly and eager to speak with me. 

So my latest article on Bacteriality is a write-up of what we discussed.  Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/06/genetransfer/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Mon Apr 7th, 2008 11:17 by Ames

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
Great interviews, on horizontal gene transfer, Amy.

I think everyone should read it.

Joyce Waterhouse

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thank you very much Joyce!

I just put up another interview on Bacteriality today.  While doing research for an article on biofilm bacteria (that I still plan to write) I stumbled across the story of Dr. Randall Wolcott - a physician in Texas who is fighting an essentially one man battle to prove to the mainstream medical community that diabetic wounds result largely from infection with biofilm bacteria.  He has also developed techniques that allow him to slowly kill the biofilms on his patients' wounds - saving his patients from the horrors of amputation.

Of course, the treatments Dr. Wolcott is using to treat biofilms are external therapies and do not work to kill biofilms within the body.  So his treatments will not target the biofilm bacteria that we have implicated (along with L-form bacteria) in causing the inflammatory diseases treated by the MP.  Also, while Dr. Wolcott is able to save his patients from amputation, unless his patients were to do the Marshall Protocol, they still have diabetes and may suffer from future wounds.

Yet, there are many parallels between his work and the MP.  First, he's trying to emphasize the importance of bacteria in an area in which they are being ignored.  He's also facing a medical community that is slow to accept his work because they are fixated on Koch's postulates and outdated culturing techniques.

I think his story is inspiring and reveals yet another person working relentlessly to show that bacteria, rather than genes or environmental factors, should be the focus of current research, and that medicine can only continue to advance if we start to treat the myraid bacteria at the heart of every inflammatory disease.

Here's the interview:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/13/wolcott/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Sun Apr 13th, 2008 22:12 by

Martha
Health Professional
 

Joined: Sun Aug 22nd, 2004
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 247
Status:  Offline
Really interesting stuff Amy! I had heard that a xylitol nasal wash was a really effective cure for chronic sinusitis. My sister suffers from type I diabetes and on 2 pumps so I will keep this info for her for future reference for diabetic wound healing. She would never consider MP until she sees me getting better.

Thank you for your great interviews, Martha

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
'Diabetic foot' made a big impact on me when I first saw it back in the 1978 timeframe during my early clinical research in Western Australia. Especially the comment from a new Intern from Pakistan who said that where he had been trained, it was called "leper's foot."

That thought caught my attention, and you will find I discussed that recollection in 2001/2002 as being one of the pieces of the jigsaw which eventually convinced me that 'autoimmune' disease just had to be caused by infection...
 

kelly well
Health Professional


Joined: Thu Feb 21st, 2008
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 120
Status:  Offline
Amy, I posted a comment at the end of your article. As a previous RN in a Newborn Intensive Care you were so right in many of your observations.

Not only are the babies exposed to such virulent "bugs" during the perinatal period  but the nurses become ill as well.  It amazes me that any of us come out alive from the exposure of such environments.  Alive....,but not unscathed.   Thanks for your hard work, kelly well

Last edited on Thu Apr 24th, 2008 04:53 by kelly well

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thanks for posting Kelly. I notice that my friends who are nurses are already dealing with a plethora of Th1 symptoms.

Well, I'm back in New York City after a successful journey to Sweden. As you probably know, I joined Dr. Marshall and Meg at the Days of Molecular Medicine Conference at the Karolinska Institute where I gave my own poster presentation. As I wrote in the DMM thread, my poster and Dr. Marshall's work in general was well received and I had a great time mingling with the other scientists at the conference.

The following piece on Bacteriality describes my experience at Karolinska in greater detail. After the piece there are links to two videos. One is the video that Dr. Marshall already put up under the Karolinska thread. The other is a short out-takes video that Paul created with some of the extra footage.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/25/dmm/

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Fri Apr 25th, 2008 17:37 by Ames

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
Amy,

So glad to read all about how well the MP went over at the conference.  Thanks for a great article and thanks to Paul for the video -- almost felt like I was there with you all.

Joyce

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
Yes! Thanks to Dr. Marshall, Meg, Amy (and Paul) for all the incredible hard work... and with videos to prove it!

Also, while videos whet my appetite, your article Amy really got me excited about the exposure the MP enjoyed at DMM!

Cocoa
inactive member
 

Joined: Thu Nov 16th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 288
Status:  Offline
Hi Amy,

Thanks for the great article on Dr. Marshall's, Meg's and your experiences at Karolinska and thank you all for your fantastic work.

I have a question about something in the article located at http://bacteriality.com/2008/04/25/dmm/#comment-3472. You wrote that:

... Dr. Marshall had two small video players velcroed to his poster that ran videos of L-form bacteria inside the blood of a patient with CFS. The blood, which is absolutely overtaken by long biofilm tubules with bacteria inside, was a rather large wake-up call to those researchers who incorrectly consider the blood to be sterile.

I am interested to learn more about this research. Who conducted this research and do you have any more information about this on your site or can refer me to further information about this?

Thank you and regards, Cocoa:)

Last edited on Fri Apr 25th, 2008 23:50 by Cocoa

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
The techniique was devised by Lida Mattman. The videos I use (most frequently) were taken by Dr Andrew Wright of the UK using the Bradford microscope at his local university. One of our members, James Sanders, put together a microscope from pieces he bought on Ebay, and produced video you will find discussed on this site. He wrote up a set of slide-prep instructions which were handed out at our LAX conference. They are at URL
http://autoimmunityresearch.org/James_slide_prep.pdf

The Foundation has a microscope as well, and I am working on ways of making it easier for us to sample the pathogens DNA for genomic analysis.
 

jsandman001
inactive member


Joined: Wed Sep 15th, 2004
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
Posts: 159
Status:  Offline
Hello Cocoa,

Im the James that Dr. Marshall mentions above. By the way great job Dr. Marshall, Meg, Amy and Paul.....can we get you guys to put a conference together here in the US :) Just a thought I know I would go!

Anyway back to you Cocoa if you would like me to answer any questions for you I will but dont get to excited yet. I have probably more than 100gigabyte of videos that I made with 3 different microscopes. Stained brightfield, Darkfield,Phase contrast and various other lighting techniques. I have showed these videos to more than a 1000 people most of them were doctors and researchers from many institutions and they were all very excited at first but I have yet to see anyone do anything with what I have found under a microscope.

I learned from Dr. Lida Mattman and Dr. Wright at the Chicago conference Dr. Marshall had. The process is very simple. Dr. Marshall linked you to the slide prep sheet I made up. The thing is you need very deep pockets to go beyond what I , Dr. Wright , Dr. Mattman have done. The next step which I started playing with in my opinion would be antigen specific immunofluorescence to identify the players considering Dr. Mattman has found more than 20 different bacteria that we are playing with. (my reference is a lyme conference speech she did some time back) .......I have gone as far as using fluorescence to show what is in the blood is bacteria which I thought was pretty exciting. The biofilm actually flouresces under the right spectrum of led lighting using prisms on both sides of a slide and strong narrow spectrum led lighting. I would caution anyone with a Th-1 disease.....Leave direct viewing of high intensity microscope lighting to others without a TH-1 disease. Unless you are using a video camera.

The next step would be isolating what we have found and ultimately getting the DNA........which would require big wallets but would lead to the proof that no one could deny about Th-1 illnesses. Especially once the powers that be saw how more alike our illnesses are than not. The only think I think that seperates all of us is what horizontal DNA transfer has taken place and what mutants we have in our lovely bacterial soup but I will defer to Dr. Marshall and Amy's articles on that subject.

For us for now the cure is easier and cheaper than finding the source :) Thanks to Dr. Marshall we have the cure.

Any questions just PM me.

Thanks,

James Sanders

Aunt Diana
inactive member


Joined: Thu Sep 29th, 2005
Location: Boquette, Panama
Posts: 1991
Status:  Offline
What an exciting article! I have goosebumps after reading it....thanks so much to all of you for your hard work and dedication.

It feels like something is starting to happen! It sounds like Trevor Marshall was totally ready for any event or opportunity that may have occurred. Fantastic!!

mndymplol
inactive guest
 

Joined: Sat Oct 6th, 2007
Location: Near Charlotte, North Carolina USA
Posts: 5
Status:  Offline
Amy,

I was surprised that the Drug Companies were so interested. I guess I assumed that their emphasis would be on maintaining the status quo rather than getting ahead of the curve. I have a friend in the upper eschelons of Phizer. He is a VP now but was one of the researchers who developed Zith. Should I be approaching him in some way about the MP?

Mindy

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
James, IMO we have to head towards single cell sampling and DNA shotgun sequencing. The antibody approach is not very useful because we don't know many of the species involved, and in any case the antibodies tend to be very non-specific, thus labelling many species besides their main target.
 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Mindy,

I don't know. It was one man from AstraZeneca that wanted to hear my whole talk and kept asking questions. I can't say why he was so interested, or if other people associated with drug companies would react with the same interest regarding the MP.

Maybe he was tired or hearing the same discussions on genetics and was interested in a fresh perspective. Then again, I do think that he wanted to know what we were doing because if his company decides to invest in lets say, more immunosuppresive drugs, he may tell his associates, "no, there may be a curative treatment option out there, we shouldn't pursue this project." So it's important that he and other people in charge of making drugs know about the MP. That's because if they are planning to put new palliatives out there for chronic disease (at the cost of billions of dollars) and patients don't end up using them because of the MP, they could get seriously screwed.

So I would contact the man you know at Pfizer. A "head's up" may help him out.

Best,

Amy

Last edited on Sat Apr 26th, 2008 09:25 by Ames

jsandman001
inactive member


Joined: Wed Sep 15th, 2004
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
Posts: 159
Status:  Offline
Dr. marshall,

You are absolutely right although that is going to be a pretty monumental acheivement. I was only stating immunofluorescence as a cheaper way to lend more to what we know......they do have very specific fluorescence but the only way it would be useful at all is to show that yeah the group tests positive for this or that but like I said and we know that we are dealing with many more than 20 for sure types of bacteria then all the mutations.

So when are you going to get the scientists to DNA sequence this stuff :) Im just playing I know what a task it will be.

Anyway my two cents,

James

migsies
inactive member


Joined: Sat Mar 26th, 2005
Location: Gainesville, Florida USA
Posts: 101
Status:  Offline
Thank you Dr.Marshall, Meg, Amy and Paul for bringing such sorely needed attention to the role of pathogens (and subsequent disruption of innate immunity and apoptosis) in mental illness at the 2008 Karolinska conference. Hopefully those with the huge resources required to get on with the much needed DNA work will now be inspired to pick up the ball and maybe collaborate with Dr. Marshall in elucidating the key players (pathogens) involved in chronic illness.

Amy, thanks for the article in bacteriality. It provides the kind of inspiration and hope we all need and lets us know that some 'big shots' in the scientific community could soon be moving in the right direction by exploring the Marshall theory. It also provided some intersting insights into Meg's alternate persona and her love of Irish pubs...something many of us can relate to, at least from before we became ill.

Incidentally, speaking of pathogens and innate immunity, there was an interesting news release recently about Salmonella and how it subverts innate immunity. I can't vouch for the mechanism cited, but at least the news release serves to draw more attention to the critical role of innate immunity and pathogens in disease, which after all is one of the central pillars of the MP theory.:)

Cocoa
inactive member
 

Joined: Thu Nov 16th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 288
Status:  Offline
Dr. Marshall and James,

Thanks for the information about viewing the bacteria. It seems almost inconceivable that such an accessbile technique - ie viewing bacteria in live blood via a microscope - has not resulted in further investigation by other researchers. I do remember reading somewhere - perhaps on Amy's site - that a mainstream researcher(s) believed that such bacteria were only present in live blood because the blood sample had become infected after collection!!!

Regards, Cocoa:)

P.S. "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect". - Mark Twain

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thanks Migsies, for you kind words about Bacteriality.  James - it's interesting to learn more about your techniques.

I just put up a short piece on Bacteriality about Dr. Azzuzi's talk at DMM on prions. I hope it simplifies the basics of his speech a little for those who might have had trouble with his accent!  Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/05/prions/

Amy

PS I've also been working to take the speech I gave about the MP in Sweden and make it into a video.  Actually Paul's working hard on the technical part right now.  It should be up soon.....

Last edited on Mon May 5th, 2008 20:40 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

I just put up my video about the MP.

Here's the description:

In the following video, I explain the science that forms the backbone of the Marshall Protocol in simple terms. I discuss the bacteria implicated in causing chronic inflammatory disease, and explain how these pathogens affect the immune system. I also describe the basics of the treatment itself, providing information that any patient who plans to start the Marshall Protocol, or any doctor planning to put a patient on the MP, should understand. My narration is accompanied by slides with pictures and images of the pathogens and molecules I discuss. The video is 89 minutes.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/07/mpintro/

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
I have temporarily taken down the video because the audio for a few slides was messed up and needs to be corrected.  It should be up later tonight.....

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline
Eeek! I just sent the link to about 500 people.... OK. Maybe only 50, but the day is young ;)

Why not put the link back up even with the rough cut until you have a replacement so people can see it? I'd hate to have sent them there only to see it down, and then they give up and never come back. At least the rough cut will allow them access to content in a timely fashion.

Thanks!--Janet

NorCalJim
inactive member


Joined: Thu Aug 24th, 2006
Location: Sacramento, California USA
Posts: 142
Status:  Offline
I caught the entire first draft video and noticed a couple sections seemed to be repeated and a couple slides seemd to be reversed. Other than that though it was absolutely awesome!!! Any plans to burn this to DVD?

NorCalJim

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline

Maybe you don't think it is ready for the Sundance film festival


. . . ;) (yet) ;) . . .


but I think your presentation was wonderful.


Saw the full first version and even with a few minor issues, the content is good thinking, excellent content in a reasonable amount of time. 

Please put the rough cut up until you replace it with your polished expectations.

Thanks!--Janet

Martin78
inactive member


Joined: Sat Jul 14th, 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 220
Status:  Offline
Hi Ames

I managed to see it before you took it down and yes, at about 15, 43 and 50something minutes there are some audio cuts that repeat themselves.

The presentation is good. If I were to give an advice on how to broaden the usage of the clip, I would divide it into shorter chapters.

Like: (this is just examples of themes, I dont remeber the storyline well enough to make proper suggestions for actual chapters)

1: What is the background (pathelogical, history, other scientists works microbs)

2; The science

3: Vitamin D

4: The actual protocol/Clinical "how to do"

If all these "chapters" where about 15-20 minutes long, It could maybee  be easier for patients to bring their lap top to their doctor and show them bit by bit whats its all about.

Before I started the MP I brought my laptop to my doctor and showed her Dr. Blaneys "Histology" speach from the DVD, and compared the findings he had experienced from his clinical practise with th1 patients and my own symptoms/findings, witch took about 20 minutes, and I think my doc appriciated it.

Because I could show her that I also had prolapsed disc, acid reflux, toenail candida, swalloing issues, skin rashes, irritability attacks, positive for mono etc ect.. all the thypical findings that Dr. Blaney mentions, I believe it was easier for my Doc to conclude that the MP was appropriate treatment.

Off course these findings came in addition to my hypercalcimia and 1,25 values off the roof. But many patients might not be so "lucky" to have so clear hypervitaminonis as I did have and might need more tools in their box to be given the treatment. Furthermore the population study used on the study site can be questioned by clinicians, They can show populations studies (with equally high "n",  with a much higher mean value of both 025 and 1,25 than the one used here.  This again would lead to much lower sigma numbers when used as baseline, buts thats another story.

Now, I am lucky, because I can have 1 hour (60min) consultations, but not everyone can, so breaking the "movie" down, little by little, would maybe be a good idea for this use.

For the rest of us (who has more time due to our illness and gladly spends 89 minutes infront a computer) the "full night movie version" works just fine.

Just my thoughts. Keep it up! You are doing a great job.

Kind Regards

Martin

 

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
So sorry for the denials of service people! I've published that page again even with the crappy version.

We have been scrambling to put out a new version, and it should be ready by 7pm EST, Lord willing.

Meanwhile, I'm uploading the original quicktime movie to a sharing site in case any of you want to see a better quality presentation. I'll be publishing a link to that in this space.

If you have any problems, please email me-- palbert1@gmail.com

Paul

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
I will shamelessly take advantage of this high-traffic page :) to make sure everybody has seen the Guidance for Emergency Room Personnel that Meg has put online today. Print a copy of the PDF and keep it in the glove box of your car...

http://www.marshallprotocol.com/forum18/12026.html
 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
The edited version of the video is now up again!  Please let me know if you see any other mistakes.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/07/mpintro/

For those who want to download a high resolution of the video, click on the "Vimeo" link in the videoplayer.  There is a download button on the bottom right of the webpage.  The file is currently at about 150 megabites.  Please note that the latest version of this video will always be embedded on the Bacteriality website, as it's likely the video content may be changed slightly in the future if new discoveries are made or new papers released.

By the way, be sure to read the post above this one where Dr. Marshall has posted the link for the new Guidelines for Emergency Room Personnel.

Best,

Amy

PS  Martin, sorry, I was writing so quickly I forget to address your suggestions.  While I think it would be helpful to some to break the video into sections I did try to make it flow as one piece.  I tried to interconnect some of what I say at the start and gradually weave a picture of how the MP parts fit together over the video. 

I could still break it up into four videos, although the vitamin D part wouldn't be complete as I spread it throught the video at times.

Since Paul and I will be in Chicago for the next two weeks on vacation, hopefully for now people could remember the time in the video where a certain section they want their physician or a friend to see starts and fast-forward to that point. 

In the meantime, if other people would like the video broken down into sections please let me know, here or by email so I can see what the demand is like or if people prefer it whole.

Thanks!

Amy

Last edited on Thu May 8th, 2008 18:40 by Ames

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
There is a program called AVIdemux (open source) which will take the MOV file you can download from Vimeo's website and cut it up with start and stop marks where you want them, copying that segment out into an MP4 container for either Windoze, Mac or Linux (or even sending back to Vimeo). Surely there is a 'volunteer' here who could do that, and reduce the load on Amy and Paul?

http://avidemux.sourceforge.net/
 

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Thanks for the offer, Trevor.

I tell you, I am a bit worried about version control, and it is all I can do to keep track of the versions I've produced alone. Further, we're not particularly sure that we'd like the video broken up. If you watch it all the way through, you may agree that it doesn't quite lend itself to chapters. Besides, on most machines it does load pretty fast.

Do you all agree?

Paul

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Paul,
A number of our members are still on dial-up connections, and the whole 100+ meg is downloaded each time they start to look at the video. Frankly, I don't know whether there is an easy answer, and I agree that version control is an issue.

Hopefully anybody thinking about cutting and pasting will hold off until the final version is online :)

..Trevor..

Martin78
inactive member


Joined: Sat Jul 14th, 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 220
Status:  Offline
I dont have the editing competence to do this  sorry :? and I dont know the script well enough to decide if it is able to cut in to smaller chapters..

I was just suggesting that a version consisting of 3-4 "chapters" would make it easier for those not on the protocol to feed their doctors "bit by bit", taking into consideration that a standard consulation is like 30 minutes or so...

But then again a "too good edited" approach: "Convince your doc to do the MP on 1-2-3 - kind of thing" might not be the best strategy either, and might even raise more sceptisism. Doctors like to "find out things on their own", "bring the solution to the table/get the credits".. they hate beeing told what to do.

When I showed Dr. Blaneys presentation to my doctor I noted exactly when the interesting stuff on the dvd started, and I just forwarded to that point, and it worked fine...besides my doc was already familiar with the MP so I didnt have to work out a strategy to get help.

Anyhow, when the final version is ready I think it would be a good idea to also post the slideshow as a permanent thread at the curemyth1.org site :)

Enjoy your holiday! And again: I am really impressed by the workload you two are laying down on this, you seem like an endless source of new ideas and quality contributions! You must be really happy having this team aboard Trevor.

BR

Martin

 

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
We do want this to work for everyone. Is anyone still having trouble loading and viewing this video? If so, what's your connection speed (modem, cable, DSL, T1, etc.) and how does this compare to your experience on YouTube?

Paul

NorCalJim
inactive member


Joined: Thu Aug 24th, 2006
Location: Sacramento, California USA
Posts: 142
Status:  Offline
Thanks for the info on how to download the entire file. I was able to download it in about 14 minutes (DSL) then encode it with MyDVD and burn it onto a DVD to watch on a standard player...

NorCalJim

Aunt Diana
inactive member


Joined: Thu Sep 29th, 2005
Location: Boquette, Panama
Posts: 1991
Status:  Offline
Hi Paul,
I've been "out of it" for a week or so, with a pretty strong neuro herx, but just caught this thread and remember having a hard time when I tried to view the film. I have a cable connection. As I recall the picture wouid stop and start and the sound was not going along with the picture....with my brain fog I couldn't deal with it.
I was able to view the UTube film but even that, at times was a bit "iffy". If you think I should try again...where do I go and what do I do.....duh....my brain is on idle.

ShrnHml
...


Joined: Fri Jul 16th, 2004
Location: St. Louis, Missouri USA
Posts: 814
Status:  Offline
Here's my 2 cents worth: make it into a DVD and sell it for a profit to the Foundation. I would much rathr lie on my sofa and watch it than sit for 90 minutes in a chair in front of my computer.  Kudos to everyone involved.    .......Sharon

arhayw
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Jul 23rd, 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 191
Status:  Offline
We have a cable connection and the video quality was fine--better than YouTube. Download time was fast too.

Aunt Diana
inactive member


Joined: Thu Sep 29th, 2005
Location: Boquette, Panama
Posts: 1991
Status:  Offline
I agree with Sharon.....I would pay for a DVD gladly.

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
The people have spoken! Well, sort of. It seems a couple people want DVDs. Maybe that will happen. For now, I won't comment on that.

For those of you like Diana, who have trouble loading the video, may recommend this strategy:

1. press play on the video.
2. press pause.
3. do something else for a while.
4. press play.
5. it should play pretty nicely, because that first play triggered the loading in the background

Paul

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Open request-- does someone want to burn a small stack of DVDs and send them out to people who request them? We could get you reimbursed by charging a nominal fee via PayPal.

Paul

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
I can burn the DVDs quite easily, but Liz is already spending a stack of time sending out DVDs, the addressing and mailing is quite time-consuming, which is why I haven't volunteered :(

I would see that a DVD with both the Karolinska interviews and Amy's summary would be the way to go.
 
 

Aunt Diana
inactive member


Joined: Thu Sep 29th, 2005
Location: Boquette, Panama
Posts: 1991
Status:  Offline
I will volunteer if someone will show me how to do it. I would love to do it.

arhayw
inactive member
 

Joined: Fri Jul 23rd, 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 191
Status:  Offline
My mom and I are also happy to help out, though we are technologically backward and have had problems burning DVDs in the past. Addressing and mailing is well within reach--no coaching required! :)

Renee

NorCalJim
inactive member


Joined: Thu Aug 24th, 2006
Location: Sacramento, California USA
Posts: 142
Status:  Offline
As I said in an earlier post I've already managed to put Amy's summary on a DVD, so have some rudimentory skills and basic software if needed to put something together and duplicate it for the other volunteers to send out....

NorCalJim

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Thanks for the interest, all.

1. Do you think it makes sense to charge a nominal fee for the cost of the DVD as well as postage? If so, how much?
2. For those of you succeeding in burning DVDs, can you find a way to put on the Karolinska interviews too?

I was also contacted by Gene saying he could lend a hand.

Whenever we decide, I'll share a full-res version of the video. It may be 300-400 MB.

Paul

NorCalJim
inactive member


Joined: Thu Aug 24th, 2006
Location: Sacramento, California USA
Posts: 142
Status:  Offline
Paul,

Putting several clips on a DVD with a basic menu to choose between them would be no problem. I believe standard DVD resolution is 720x480 but the Vimeo clip looked pretty good on my TV at home, pretty close to standard broadcast quality...

Jim

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Sounds good, Jim.

Any thoughts on how much it would cost to produce and send such a DVD?

We should have a final version of the movie in a week or two.

Paul

NorCalJim
inactive member


Joined: Thu Aug 24th, 2006
Location: Sacramento, California USA
Posts: 142
Status:  Offline
Paul,

I'd be happy to donate my time for the setup of the menus and a master image so that's free. I can price the rest but I'd give a ballpark figure of maybe $3-$4 each delivered. This would be for computer burned DVD-R disks with hand written or no labels in a proper shipping sleeve which I think would be fine for a grassroots effort at getting this info out to those that could benefit.

Note that computer burned disks aren't quite as compatible as mass produced ones but will work on most (95%) of settop players and pretty much any computer with a DVD drive.

Jim

slunn
inactive member
 

Joined: Mon Feb 25th, 2008
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 45
Status:  Offline
I happy to help burn and distribute dvd's in (or from) the UK if it's any help.
Stu

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

First off, thanks SO much to everyone who has voluteered to burn or distribute DVDs of my MP video.  Paul and I just got back from vacation yesterday, so we will be contacting you soon and setting up an official plan for distribution.  We just need a day or two to make sure the video is in good condition (no errors!) before officially making it a DVD.

I also want to let you know that I just put up a new patient interview on Bacteriality.  I spoke with Peter de Jager who is doing very well after suffering from severe CFS and chemical sensitivities (IBS and depression too).

Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/23/interview20/

Best,

Amy

Vicki SA
Member


Joined: Thu Sep 15th, 2005
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 415
Status:  Offline
Thanks Amy for the article on Peter and his improvements with CFS, MCS.

In the article though, it says that he has been on MP for 5 years. It is actually less than 3 years.

http://www.marshallprotocol.com/forum19/4063.html

I started taking 40mg Benicar 8 hourly (0630, 1430 and 2230 hrs) on August 27, 2005.

Cheerio Vicki

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Vickie,

Thanks so much for the correction.  I wrote the introductory blurb during vacation when I didn't have the rest of the interview with me and though I remembered accurately how long he'd been on the MP.  Actually though, I was thinking of another person that I interviewed a few days after him.

Thanks again!

Amy

Knochen
inactive member
 

Joined: Wed Feb 22nd, 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 369
Status:  Offline
I was still getting a lot of a boost even with the 5 year figure!  If he's that improved at 3 years, there is hope for me yet.  It's been a rough couple of months coming up on my 2 year anniversary. I do often wonder when the good times will arrive.  Hoping for soon.

Great article, Amy, and so much sounds so familiar.  Except for employer being so sympathetic.  I get no sympathy and sometimes outright disdain for my illness from my management at work. It's a good thing Benicar is good for blood pressure. ;)

Keep those articles coming.

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Knochen,

I was still feeling pretty shabby around 2 yrs.  Now, three years into the MP it's definitely easier.  Of course it can definitely still get even easier!  Sorry to hear about your work environment.  It sounds like one of those places where you look forward to the day when you can tell your co-workers "I told you so!"

Anyway, I have finally written an article about biofilm bacteria and just put it up on Bacteriality.  I am truly intrigued by bioilms and in a sense, research on biofilms has just started to warm up.  So I expect we will hear much more about biofilms in the years to come, particularly when the mainstream begins to understand that most of the bacteria causing chronic disease are likely in a biofilm-like state.

Here's the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/26/biofilm/

Amy

Cass A
inactive guest
 

Joined: Wed Jun 13th, 2007
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 9
Status:  Offline
Dear Amy,

I just finished reading your article on biofilms!

OUTSTANDING!!

Best,

Cass A

Joyful
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jun 8th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 14541
Status:  Offline
I agree.

OUTSTANDING WORK AMY!!!

:):):)

kelly well
Health Professional


Joined: Thu Feb 21st, 2008
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 120
Status:  Offline
Amy, If it isn't too late to comment on the charge of the video CDs.  I'd charge $10-$15.  Since going on MP we have saved so much in entertainment expenses and going out to eat. Add that to the fact of not having to do near the medical diagnostic tests and we can afford that money for your video.

I use to be on the staff of a well respected Christian non profit organization. We never did anything that did not make money, our large church charges nominal fees for everything it does except for newcomers, but would never keep someone from participating (they would descreetly pay their way).

For thoses who can't afford the CD start a "partnership" thing for those buying the CD (ie buy yours for 10 - 15 Dollars and "partner" someone who needs the help for another 10-15 dollars).

Yes in the beginning the MP costs a fair amount with NOIR"S benicar etc., but I've avoided ER visists, expensive Diagnostic exams etc. and I've truly gained a WEALTH of help and information from the site. This organization deserves so much $$$$ for all it is doing. Let's start with CD's and go from there.

 Sincerely, Kelly well

 

carol
Support Team


Joined: Mon Jul 12th, 2004
Location: Jackson Hole, Wyoming USA
Posts: 934
Status:  Offline
Kelly:

That's an excellent point regarding the cost effectiveness of the MP in the long run.

Don't overlook how easy it is to donate to ARF.  Just click "PayPal Donate" on the top of this page :).

Carol 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Thank you so much Cass and Joyful, glad you liked the biofilm piece.

Kelly, thanks for offering a valuable suggestion about the price for a DVD.  I believe they are being burned at the current moment.  I'm in a bit of a rush now, but once they have been officially created I will sit down and decide on a price.  Your feedback will be very helpful.

Carol, you're right - everyone take note of the donate button!

I'm writing to let you know I just put another interview up on Bacteriality.  I interviewed Roy P who is known as Bookdad on this site.  He's been making it through the MP and been taking care of 7 kids in the process.  Not bad!

Here the link:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/06/03/interview21/

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

Just letting you guys know I put up a new piece today about probiotics.

While the hypothesis put forth is controversial and not yet proven to be true, it's caught my attention.  Palliation is no longer necessarily equated with wellness, so IMO it's worth taking a new look at how the probiotics may affect the innate immune response in the gut.

Here you go:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/06/11/probiotics/

Best,

Amy

Knochen
inactive member
 

Joined: Wed Feb 22nd, 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 369
Status:  Offline
Amy,

Good article. 

It looks like somebody posted it on Digg.com to get you some exposure, but sadly, the comments by the unwashed masses only serve to point up their lack of reading and critical thinking skills.  It's pretty sad to look at.

It makes me realize what an uphill battle the MP will have. It seems that unless you have something at stake, like your own health, you can just go on drinking the kool-aide of mainstream medicine and Madison Avenue.  So for those who cannot or will not make the leap, I will waste no more pity. As Charles Dickens so aptly put it:
``Many can't go there; and many would rather die.''
``If they would rather die,'' said Scrooge, ``they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. . . "

(OK, so it's a little out of context):cool:

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Those who have their own health at stake are most in denial. That is what is sad.

Here is a person dying from Pancreatic cancer talking about "achieving your childhood dreams" and praising his doctors as the best in the world. Isn't it strange how the human mind often cannot bear to contemplate the stark truth, and prefers a candy coating.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ji5_MqicxSo
 
 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Knochen, Trevor,

As stated by one of the main characters in American Beauty, "never underestimate the power of denial."

Get this.  My probiotics article somehow appeared on Digg thanks to a marketing specialist from BLISS probiotics.  I mention the company in the piece as one that seems to be going a little overboard in their probiotic production.  The marketing guy apparently assumed that my article about probiotics must have been lauditory.  Clearly he didn't read it.  Anway, he thanked me for spreading work about the company.

No wonder the comments after the piece as so pathetic.  Few people even understand that it's possible to look at probiotics from a different angle.

Amy

Aunt Diana
inactive member


Joined: Thu Sep 29th, 2005
Location: Boquette, Panama
Posts: 1991
Status:  Offline
Ames,
Not only are you brilliant....you have the patience of a saint!!

sunflower
inactive member


Joined: Sun Jul 24th, 2005
Location: Yuba City, California USA
Posts: 393
Status:  Offline
hi ames,

i was on the fence about continuing to take probiotics....not any more;). your wonderful article so clearly elucidated the case against them, that i'm going to stop wasting my money.  thanks again for all your hard work and dedication in spreading dr. marshall's research to the masses :cool:...you are too much!    sun

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Hi All,

Getting bookmarked by one of the social bookmarking services made me think, hey, why aren't I doing that? To that end, I've included a bit of code on bacteriality ("ShareThis") that allows you to add it to any of the social bookmarking sites out there. In a nutshell, social bookmarking allows you to share your bookmarks online with other users. The type of people that belong to a given service varies, so sometimes it makes sense to bookmark to multiple services.

About social bookmarking: some people think it's a waste of time, but I'm not sure it is. I realize that traffic (here's a public view of Bacteriality's) should never be its own end, but if we can better reach out to certain key groups such as researchers and would-be funders, I think it would be time well-spent.

I was thinking that I might start promoting via social bookmarking services all of Amy's future articles and certain ones from the archives-- i.e. "Intro to the MP", "Getting it right", etc. (More upon request.)

I'm hesitant to ask anyone to spend any time but if this is your baileywick, maybe you would want to help out. Two ways you might want to lend a hand.

1. Bookmark pages in Bacteriality using your social bookmarking service of choice. This requires setting up an account (links below...).

2. I've very tentatively targeted a list of services that I suspect have the kind of demographic we're after. Here's that list:
Citeulike (these first two are more scholarly)
Connotea
Technorati
Delicious
Digg
Stumbleupon
Reddit

What do you think about this list? Any additions or subtractions you might make?

thanks,
Paul

p.s. A little bit of humor to end this long post. This quote comes from a blog that linked to Amy's article on obesity:

This article is interesting...although long and boring and way over my head!

NickBowler
inactive member


Joined: Wed Dec 20th, 2006
Location: Stirling, United Kingdom
Posts: 189
Status:  Offline
Has anyone checked this site out before?

http://www.cfs-allicin.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3&Itemid=9


Martha
Health Professional
 

Joined: Sun Aug 22nd, 2004
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 247
Status:  Offline
Intersting Amy!! I've noticed probiotics in the pill form do not to help palliate any of my symptoms. I have noticed however that yogurt and fermented milk products do. Maybe the relief I feel when I eat yogurt or kefir has more to do with the calcium and not so much to do with the probiotics.....

On the whole probiotic topic, I read an article from the "Therabreath" site talking of studies they had done in Europe with children and sore throats/bad breath. They found that a very small percentage of children never had sore throats or bad breath. When they cultured these children's mouths, they found that they naturally had a high percentage of the bacteria called streptococcus salivarium. They now make not only breath products with this bacteria but also a lozenge for sore throats.

Thanks for all your great work:D

Martha 

Last edited on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 20:43 by Martha

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Nick,

I can't get your link to work!...and I'm sure it's about something interesting.

Martha - thanks for sharing.  It would be interesting to hear more direct reports about how effectively products made from streptococcus salivarium have been found to work. 

Also, I just put a new interview up on Bacteriality.

I interviewed Chris Eastlund, a long-time MPer who has now essentially recovered from diabetes, sarcoidosis, and irritable bowel syndrome thanks to the MP.  

http://bacteriality.com/2008/06/19/interview22/

Best,

Amy


NickBowler
inactive member


Joined: Wed Dec 20th, 2006
Location: Stirling, United Kingdom
Posts: 189
Status:  Offline
Amy,

Yes they didn't seem to post properly. Here they are again, if you can move them then please go ahead !

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lectins
 
http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl?action=browse;oldid=Lectin;id=Lectins

Nick 

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

Just wanted to let you know that I just put up a new interview on Bacteriality.  I spoke with Bonnie B who has recovered from Lupus and Sjoren's Syndrome thanks to the MP.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/07/02/interview23/

I also had a great time at the "Understanding Aging" Conference.  Once again, I was delighted to see that nearly everyone at the Conference was very interested by Dr. Marshall's work.  I look forward to writing more about the Conference soon on Bacteriality.  In the meantime I am still in California visiting family.

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

I'm gathering my thoughts on the Aging Conference into an article, but I'll be putting up a few other articles while the video footage from the Conference is being completed.  Today I  just put up a short piece about the hormone oxytocin and its relationship to our moods and phobias:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/07/05/oxytocin/

Best,

Amy

PS  Also, Paul revamped the "search" feature for the site using a Google custom search engine, so it's much easier to find relevant articles.  Thanks Paul!


Last edited on Sun Jul 6th, 2008 09:15 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi!

I finally got around to putting up a piece where I reflect on the Aging Conference.  Here it is:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/07/09/aging08/

Best,

Amy

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
Great article, Amy.  I had a lot of the same thoughts as you did during those talks and you did a great job of explaining what was presented and putting it into a context that makes a lot of sense to us MPers.

I would also add that I was interested in Zheng Cui's talk and one or two others, which showed the previously over-looked importance of the innate immune system.  Cui had a lot of video showing the power of the innate immune system against cancer and I spent quite a while chatting to him about the MP while in line for lunch one day.

Joyce Waterhouse

Last edited on Sat Jul 12th, 2008 19:17 by jcwat101

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
True Joyce,

The fact that Dr. Cui's talk focused on the importance of the innate immune system was encouraging.  It's cool you got to talk to him...I didn't get a chance...

I'm also writing to let you know there's a new interview up on Bacteriality.  I spoke with Gene Johnson.  His story is an interesting one because while he started the MP for sarcoidosis, he ended up using it to treat his bladder cancer as well.  I think his story is a must read for anyone with cancer, in no small part because (as Gene realized) some of the drugs used to treat cancer actually have negative effects on the immune system.  So in my opinion, it's important to avoid one drug in particular and instead work to strengthen the innate immune response towards possible cancer-causing bacteria with the MP.

Gene's sarcoidosis symptoms have diminished substantially and he has been cancer free for over a year.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/07/18/interview24/

Best,

Amy

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

Just letting you guys know that I put up a new article on Bacteriality.  It's about the Human Microbiome Project.  Scientists associated with the project are using new molecular tools to sequence bacterial genomes.  Hopefully their data will allow us to better characterize the microbiota we know cause chronic inflammatory disease.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/07/27/microbiome/#more-222

Best,

Amy

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Hi,

This is Amy accidentally logged in under Paul's account.

Many of you might have heard today that comedian Bernie Mac died.  His publicists will tell you he died of pnuemonia but he's had sarcoidosis since his 20s.  His death is a prime example of how deadly sarcoidosis can be and how the medical often community fails to acknowledge this reality.

I wrote a Newsflash about the incident:

http://bacteriality.com/2008/08/09/berniemac/

Amy

Last edited on Sat Aug 9th, 2008 13:13 by paulalbert

Freddie Ash
...


Joined: Fri Apr 8th, 2005
Location: LeSage, West Virginia USA
Posts: 1019
Status:  Offline
HI AMY

This is Fred in WV.  Thanks for the great atricle.  What you said in the article about Sarcoidosis killing more that reported is what I got after my doctor about  back in the mid 1980s.  I had a friend with sarc that died while he was in the hospital with pnuemonia and kidney problems. I told the doctor that they most likely put that my friend died of kidney failure or pnuemonia and never said anything about the sarc.  I said that no wonder they said that only 200 died a year from Sarcoidosis.  My doctor said I was right and it was the doctors fault that things like that happens.

Remember, we are all in this together and I am pulling for us.

Your friend in Sarcoidosis

Freddie

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline
The Sarcoidosis 2003 ACCESS study showed absolutely nobody in the huge cohort with a sarcoidosis dx went into any kind of remission. Hard to believe Bernie's sarc drs from Chicago were not aware of that detail.

What does seem to happen, to avoid identifying death specific to Sarc or not is not clear, is a shell game naming-convention that defers to subcategory or a generic catch-all category at the time of death. Pneumonia, COPD, kidney and/or heart failure seem to be quite popular.

No matter what it is called, his death is still tragic. Death is death, regardless of who you are. Even more sad too, knowing that any Sarc-related death at this time might have been averted with the MP.

Maybe his family will want to ask his doctors some pointed questions in a couple of years, when it is easier to focus on who knew what and when.

Bane
Research Team


Joined: Sat Jan 26th, 2008
Location: Norway
Posts: 974
Status:  Offline
In this Norwegian note its actually bein put weight on the fact that he had sarc, and lookin at his fingertips it seems he had digital clubbing aswell.

http://www.kjendis.no/2008/08/09/543102.html

on digital clubbing

http://www.turner-white.com/pdf/hp_sep03_club.pdf

Another One

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
I've gone ahead and "Dugg" Amy's article about Bernie Mac's tragic death and if you have the ability, I ask you to do the same. The more people who Digg an article, the more likely it is that it will show up in a list of recommendations for webpages that a great number of people will read.

How does one Digg an article? Simple (sort of).

1. Register at digg.com
2. Go to Amy's article.
http://bacteriality.com/2008/08/09/berniemac/
3. At the top, click on "share this."
4. Select Digg.
5. Click on the button on the left, which says "Digg it."

If you have any trouble, please let me know.

Thanks!

Paul

Last edited on Sun Aug 10th, 2008 20:30 by paulalbert

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
After you get taken to the Digg site, you still have to click on another "Digg It" (the one underneath the number of diggs)
 

Lee
Member


Joined: Sun Feb 13th, 2005
Location: Currituck, North Carolina USA
Posts: 688
Status:  Offline
Thanks to everyone for all of this info!!   May Bernie rest in peace.   Amy and Paul we will be diggin' it ....:)  BTW ....Jeff ....I Love You Too!!  Lee

Timber
member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 7th, 2005
Location:  
Posts: 65
Status:  Offline
Yes Amy, a very well written article. We who have Sarcoidosis know it was the pnemunia that's blamed, but an otherwise healthy 50 year old male would not usually succumb to this, if not for the weakened condition of his lungs from Sarcoidosis. May he and his family find peace. I too wish the media would cover this more accurately and not down play the Sarcoidosis impact here.

Perhaps someone should contact People and all the other magazines that will no doubt be writing this up for their next publication?

Best to all - Timber

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
An announcement of sorts. Remember Amy's "Overview of the MP" video? It's an 85-minute presentation on the MP, and it reviews, among other topics, the science supporting the MP. The presentation can be found here:
http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/07/mpintro/

It's still on the web. For me, that remains the best way to view this presentation.

But, some of you have said it would be more convenient to watch this on television. It took a while but we finally have a DVD you can play in a typical DVD player.

Gene (edj2001) has very graciously volunteered to burn and send DVDs to people who want them. The cost, including shipping and handling, is $4.

For the sake of convenience, the easiest way to do this is to send $4 per DVD via PayPal. For those who are unclear about PayPal, it's fairly easy to use. Once your account is set up, all you have to do is say "send $4 to a particular email address."

I'll let Gene decide if he wants to put up his email address here. In the meantime, you can PM him and he'll tell you what it is.

Paul

edj2001
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 17th, 2005
Location:  Allen, Texas USA
Posts: 362
Status:  Offline
Thanks Paul,

I have added my email address to my profile.

Gene

edj2001
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 17th, 2005
Location:  Allen, Texas USA
Posts: 362
Status:  Offline
I have just completed the first batch of DVD orders and they will go out in tomorrows (8/15) USPS so be on the look out for them.  Thanks for your comments of encouragement. 

Also, since I am just getting started, please alert me to any problems you have with postage, handling damage, DVD scuffing, play back quality, etc. 
 
Personal checks are OK if PayPal is not an option.
 
Gene

My address:

Gene Johnson
446 Trinity Dr.
Allen, TX 75002

Phone: 469 675 1316

Last edited on Thu Aug 14th, 2008 13:27 by edj2001

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Gene - thanks so much for your help with the DVDs!  By the way Gene, what protein do you code for...he he..

About a week ago I attended a three day training session at the J. Craig Venter Institute where I took a class is bacteria sequencing and annotation techniques.  Although the workshop was challenging I learned a lot and got know some very interesting and intelligent people.  I finally got around to writing about my experience on Bacteriality.

http://bacteriality.com/2008/08/17/jcvi/

Best,

Amy 

edj2001
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 17th, 2005
Location:  Allen, Texas USA
Posts: 362
Status:  Offline
Hi Amy.
I think I code for the Rocky Road ice-cream suppressor gene, there is definitely a deficiency here  :P:P

I am looking forward to reading your article!

If you haven’t seen it yet, be sure to take a look at Dr. Blaney’s latest post referencing the proposed hypothesis of endometriosis being caused by Shigella infection and the method used to determine this.  This technique will show bacterial DNA in human cells and continue to confirm the MP as Dr. Marshall notes in his UCLA aging presentation.  Might be a good topic for an article. 

http://www.marshallprotocol.com/forum11/2520-2.html

1: Med Hypotheses. 2008;70(2):239-43. Epub 2007 Sep 20. Links
Role of Shigella infection in endometriosis: a novel hypothesis.

Gene

edj2001
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 17th, 2005
Location:  Allen, Texas USA
Posts: 362
Status:  Offline
BUMP
My email and address are on my profile.  If papal is not an option, personal check is OK.
Gene

Paul said:

"An announcement of sorts. Remember Amy's "Overview of the MP" video? It's an 85-minute presentation on the MP, and it reviews, among other topics, the science supporting the MP. The presentation can be found here:
http://bacteriality.com/2008/05/07/mpintro/

It's still on the web. For me, that remains the best way to view this presentation.

But, some of you have said it would be more convenient to watch this on television. It took a while but we finally have a DVD you can play in a typical DVD player.

Gene (edj2001) has very graciously volunteered to burn and send DVDs to people who want them. The cost, including shipping and handling, is $4.

For the sake of convenience, the easiest way to do this is to send $4 per DVD via PayPal. For those who are unclear about PayPal, it's fairly easy to use. Once your account is set up, all you have to do is say "send $4 to a particular email address."

I'll let Gene decide if he wants to put up his email address here. In the meantime, you can PM him and he'll tell you what it is.

Paul"

Last edited on Mon Sep 8th, 2008 18:23 by edj2001

edj2001
Member


Joined: Mon Oct 17th, 2005
Location:  Allen, Texas USA
Posts: 362
Status:  Offline
BUMP

Bella
Health Professional


Joined: Sat Aug 27th, 2005
Location: Ask Me, USA
Posts: 2080
Status:  Offline
Gene and Amy,

Thank you so much for this DVD! It is great:dude:..I now will have something easy to understand  that is all in one place to share with my family.

Jeannine

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi All,

I'm pleased to share that my post on the 2008 Congress on Autoimmunity is here:
http://bacteriality.com/2008/09/22/coa/

Included in that post is the video from my talk. I am to understand that the other talks should be up shortly.

Amy

Last edited on Mon Sep 22nd, 2008 13:38 by Ames

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi,

Paul and I wrote an article about our experience at the recent IOM workshop on vitamin D and calcium. The point of the workshop was to help a committee decide if the amount of vitamin D recommended to the average American should be raised.

Here is the article:
http://bacteriality.com/2009/08/10/iom/

Best,
Amy

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Yesterday, I moved to Bacteriality to a different server. I don't know if the rest of you have had problems but I would often get notices that the site was down. So frustrating!!!

Anyway, if you notice any kind of functionality issues, please let me know.

Paul

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
According to the prestigious electronic resource, Faculty of 1000, Amy's paper is a "must read." How about that!

Here is what Dr. Steven Witkin's review says:

The clear message of this article is that molecular genetic studies of diseases must include analysis of resident bacterial genomes and not focus solely on the human genome. The observations presented in this review are thought-provoking and offer new ways of thinking about the origin of diseases and possible novel treatments.

The essence of this eye-opening article is that 90% of the cells in the human body are bacterial, that bacterial genomes are expressed in humans and that they have profound positive or negative influences on health.

Compelling evidence is presented that humans are "superorganisms" whose molecular functions result from the sum of interactions between the human genome and a multitude of microbial genomes. The advantages of bacterial colonization and its profound influence on the diversity of the human metagenome are emphasized. The human genome is composed of about 30,000 genes, while the endogenous microbial flora contribute millions of genes. In addition, transcription of the human genome is altered by the presence or absence of bacterial products. Differences in bacterial colonization account for individual variations in gene expression. Lastly, the potential pivotal role of endogenous microbial genomes on the induction and persistence of autoimmune disease is emphasized.


Note that very few papers are selected to be discussed in F1000.

You have to register to see the full text (as of today, there's not much else but there may be comments over the next few days and months):
http://f1000medicine.com/article/id/1164263

Paul

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline
Excellent work. Thank you.

A very nice professional arena, too, as a simple review of Global faculty experts navigation menu covers many chronic diseases/diseases of aging.

You deserve every kudo, Amy. Thanks for passing the word on Paul.

Side note: When I read Witkin's review, I thought it was too bad that the metagenomic conference folks are narrowing their focus to soil and seawater, but that isn't a total bust. Methinks they will find *some* of us along their way whether they want to or not. Or, of course, some of what they find will continue to turn up on someone's next joint replacement.

Just how did those hydrothermal vent bacteria get --there--?


Keep up the good work. Always good to read of your success.

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Amy's "Autoimmunity Review" on the metagenome has been honored with recommendation as a "Must Read" by the "Faculty of 1000" :) :)

Click here for a link to the citation

And yes, like most medical articles these days, a subscription is needed to view the detailed text :X :X

Obviously, also congratulations to Paul and myself :) as well as ChrisB, Joyce, Greg, Tom,  and everybody who helps us frame and disseminate our scientific message.

..Trevor..
 

Martin78
inactive member


Joined: Sat Jul 14th, 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 220
Status:  Offline
Great news!

eClaire
inactive member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
Thank you all for working so tirelessly to get the word out. Claire

Ames
Research Team


Joined: Tue Mar 8th, 2005
Location: New York, New York USA
Posts: 790
Status:  Offline
Hi Y'all,

It took enough time, but I have a new post up on Bacteriality. It shows photos of people in Chengdu and Hong Kong blocking sun with wanton disregard for their health. :)
http://bacteriality.com/2009/10/01/sun-blocking/

We could have taken more but we were rather short on time. Most of them were taken by Paul from a cab.

Each photo is clickable.

Best,
Amy

jrfoutin
Research Team


Joined: Mon Aug 8th, 2005
Location: Utah USA
Posts: 4980
Status:  Offline
Blocking the sun is fun with the umbrellas.

Even with all the sun blocking, people in China still have chronic disease and diseases of aging or there wouldn't be a requirement for the study.

It will be interesting to see what the D's are for study participants (knowing women commonly block sun exposure), and of course, environmental changes that might be required (if not common Chinese supplements, then possibly other dietary sources? Maybe egg yolks, soy, fish oils? Who knows?)

Great pictures though, I'd fit right in with my umbrella (wink).--Janet

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Hi All,

A couple hours ago, I put up a video of a talk I gave at a conference, but there was a small error, so I took it down and put it up again. Thanks to Rob for pointing it out.

The topic was why some patients with chronic disease are disaffected and how online social networks have met some of their needs. I try to offer a balanced perspective – both the good and bad of online social networks.

You can view it here:
http://bacteriality.com/2009/10/19/networks/

Best,
Paul

jcwat101
health professional


Joined: Mon Jul 19th, 2004
Location: Pasadena, USA
Posts: 2044
Status:  Offline
Great talk!   I think you touched on a lot of things that many people don't know about (those who have not entered into the world of chronic illness).

And it was good that you were able to get in some stuff about the MP and the role of bacteria at the same time.

Joyce

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Thanks, Joyce.

If I had my way, I would spend almost all my time talking about the MP, but... the point wasn't to proselytize but to get medical librarians to think more deeply about online social networks. It was interesting that most in the audience agreed that web 2.0 was a "sea change" in medicine.

Paul

k
Member*
 

Joined: Thu Aug 9th, 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 1274
Status:  Offline
Thanks Paul.  On a really bad herx day, the "chain of logic" and "101 euphemisms" definitely gave me a pick up.

I was curious about the "Sources of Funding" slide.  Is this funding for you personally?, for Bacteriality.com?, for the Autoimmunity Foundation?

Thanks.

regards, k

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
I probably should have been a little less subtle there. If you look at the slide, I am claiming a number of rather implausible sources of funding including all the major pharmaceutical companies, Tyson chicken, John Deere, etc. Basically, it was a joke.

That slide was inspired by a certain researcher I saw at the IOM meeting in D.C. who started his talk on vitamin D by saying essentially, "I am funded by tanning bed manufacturers and providers, but never mind how that affects my ability to speak objectively about vitamin D. On to the next slide!"

In case you're interested, the Foundation is working hard to get grants necessary for travel. presentations, running the study, etc.

Best,
Paul

eClaire
inactive member


Joined: Sun Sep 24th, 2006
Location: Newtownards, N. Ireland, United Kingdom
Posts: 1658
Status:  Offline
I particularly liked your "does misery love company" portion (or does misery breed misery).  One of the things I like about the MP site is that there are plenty of upbeat people.  Sure some aren't and sometimes we need support for our misery, but there are plenty of people to befriend who have positive attitudes. 

I belonged to a social network site for folk with chronic illness and I found the constant negativity to be a major drag.  I'm looking for ways to not only feel not so alone but to be uplifted, and thank goodness there are others on the MP who feel the same.  So we tend to have a nice balance here.

Claire

k
Member*
 

Joined: Thu Aug 9th, 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 1274
Status:  Offline
Thanks Paul.  Sorry - I didn't get the joke.

Agree with Claire on 'misery loves company'.  There's definitely a good mix of people here.

regards, k

Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4126
Status:  Offline
Paul, what software am I missing to run this.  All I get in addition to your intro paragraph is a large mostly empty square with a little box in the upper left corner with a few tiny colored squares in the little box.  Cynthia

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
Dear Cynthia and anyone else who might be interested,

Sorry for all the problems with this video. I've had a heck of a time getting it to work. Now I think it works as expected - the audio and video is synced, the aspect ratio is better, etc.

As always please let me know, if it doesn't load as expected.
http://bacteriality.com/2009/10/19/networks/

Best,
Paul

Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4126
Status:  Offline
No, it is still not working for me, but I really think it is my problem.  What software is used to view this video?  Maybe it is because I an running Explorer 6.  Cynthia

paulalbert
Research Team


Joined: Thu Jul 15th, 2004
Location: New York USA
Posts: 1034
Status:  Offline
You shouldn't be using that browser. Why don't you try using something Google Chrome?
http://www.google.com/chrome

It's faster, more secure....

Paul

Cynthia S
Foundation Staff


Joined: Wed Dec 24th, 2008
Location: N., Arizona USA
Posts: 4126
Status:  Offline
I have a new computer in a box here, so will be off Explorer 6 very soon.  Will revisit your link as soon as we can get the new computer set up, which may not be so soon, come to think of all the obstacles.  Have to do something about added ventilation for the cabinet the computer housing will be slipping into.  Cynthia 

Prof Trevor Marshall
Foundation Staff


Joined: Fri Jul 9th, 2004
Location: Thousand Oaks, California USA
Posts: 16026
Status:  Offline
Cynthia,
Both Firefox and Chome install really easily, and they convert your bookmarks without any hassle :)
 



* We can help you understand chronic disease, but only your physician is licensed to give you medical care *

Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Entire site Copyright © 2004-2020 Autoimmunity Research Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Click here to view our PRIVACY POLICY
Page processed in 0.1328 seconds (25% database + 75% PHP). 20 queries executed.